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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Looking to get another male as my current almost 2 year old male is intact but not dominant or aggressive. He’s a very chill, non aggressive male GSD. On the smaller side 60ish lbs and never has been dog aggressive or aggressive period.
I’ve seen my dog try to mount 1 or 2 dogs before but it’s never turned into a fight or anything. He seems to hold his own if another male does it to him but it’s also never turned into anything.

I am currently looking at a 11-12 month old male in czech who has basic obedience and bite work done.Per the breeder he’s not dog aggressive and doesn’t assert his dominance on other males.

my questions: will I have an issue at home since my male isn’t dominant and is pretty submissive regardless of the 2nd male?
— should I fix my first male since I’m not working him or breeding him?
Also what’re some things I should do if I decide to proceed to help them meet and ease tensions. The new male is in Europe so I cannot have them meet first.

only reason I’m going with this male is because I really like the pedigree, the breeder and that he had some foundation built in.

Any insight would be great! Thanks!!!
***my initial post was regarding a 12 month old male GSD (new). What if I brought home a 12 week old GSD to my non dominant male? Same issues or easier?
 

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Honestly, there is always a risk. Even if you were to go with a female it may not work out. It’s all about mitigating the risk by stacking the odds in your favor then having a plan b.

Personally, I like more of an age difference between my dogs. At 2, your current male may or may not have come into himself.... an 11 month old definitely hasn’t. That said, they don’t have to be best friends, but they need to respect each other and you.

My most recent pairing was two males and I loved it! Tilden was a mellow and social guy, tho 6yrs and neutered. He was raised with a dominate female and had gotten along with every age, size, sex and temperament of dog, in my home, as I use to board dogs. I brought a very confident and pushy Keystone home at 7 months. We went on walks together from day 1, we’d return home and the boys stayed seperated by a baby gate and/or crate.... I’d train with Keystone daily prior to their walks. Introductions were slow and structured not allowing either boy to posture or focus too much on each other. Eventually, and I didn’t keep track of how long, they began comfortably coexisting with occasional but brief play sessions, and thats the relationship they kept for 6 more years. T liked to swim and Keys likes to hike so I regularly took them on outings separately. They had a single fight, with mild injuries, in the first few weeks but it was what it was and I didn’t overthink it or blow things out of proportion - I was committed to keeping both dogs by any means, even permanent separation if need be.

Keystone gets along with other dogs (just today a stray followed us home and they hung out for a couple hours), however, he’s somewhat of a brat and subtlety possessive of his things.... I highly doubt he would enjoy a new sibling now that Tilden has passed. Sometimes the way a dog is with others outside of the home can be quite different than who they are in the home after being an only child for some time. Just something to keep in the back of your mind.

So, hope for the best, prepare for the worst, and be honest about what you, your experience level, your environment and your finances can handle.
 

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Plan b.. not too sure since he comes from overseas.
I think what Tim is alluding to is - do you have the time, space, ability and desire to keep both dogs while still meeting all of their needs if it ends up that they have to be separated forever? (ie, crate and rotate)

Do you have the funds, resources and network should you need to hire a behaviorist or rehome one of the dogs.

Those are the things you have to be thinking about...
 

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Discussion Starter #6
I think what Tim is alluding to is - do you have the time, space, ability and desire to keep both dogs while still meeting all of their needs if it ends up that they have to be separated forever? (ie, crate and rotate)

Do you have the funds, resources and network should you need to hire a behaviorist or rehome one of the dogs.

Those are the things you have to be thinking about...
I have the resources and funds for sure. I wouldn’t re home unless they were un able to be together. If I can hire a behaviorist or trainer to do that specific task that’s fine.
My question is generally, I know it’s not possible to assume what will happen but based off prior and past experiences would a submissive and a normal GSD male get along is more what I aimed my question at. I know if both are aggressive or dominant it’s a 0 % chance usually so that’s why I’m asking.
 

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So my female was submissive to other dogs until I brought another female home. They couldn’t live together. She was 2, the new girl was 10 months.

I know you’re asking about males, but the point is, with ADOLESCENTS... you don’t know.

Gia went from a fun silly submissive party girl dog park dog, to giving female dogs their name like a flip of a switch... I rehomed Rex, Gia never switched back.

That’s all I have as far as experience to share.
 

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As others have said, up can increase your chance by doing slow, carefully managed introductions, preferably in a neutral location. At home I'd probably also keep them separated for a bit to allow your dog to get used to the new interloper.

And yes, plan B is up to you. But there is a chance that mellow or not any 2 dogs just won't get along at all.

They are live animals with their own individual thoughts and feelings. So it's really difficult to say how these 2 will get along.

Buying a dog from a breeder in Europe definitely makes having a plan B more important and at the same time logistically difficult.

I wouldn't rely too heavily on what a behaviorist can do if they don't like each other, but if that's your plan B, I suggest also formulating a plan C!
 

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There’s a couple things to consider. I’ll tell you that submissive adults usually become pretty dominant with younger dogs. It’s not something I would recommend you to do unless you are prepared to keep them separated permanently or rehome one.
 

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Long ago we had a submissive older male and got a juvenile male @ 1 year who was more dominant. After introductions which consisted of primarily off leash walks, lots of them, as long as we did not upset the apple cart by trying to force the younger dog to be submissive, but respected his dominance over the other male, there were very few issues.

You will probably have to look out for little things, like the submissive dog being in a room and the dominant dog laying in the hall in essence trapping the submissive male. You will need to ensure the safe exit of the submissive male.

Look for little things that tend to trigger fights, doorways, food, toys, over arousal, excitement, other dogs...brush up on dog body language. If walking, keep on moving, avoid stopping or moving slowly. It's probably doable with some effort.
 

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How about another angle what is it about a dog in Europe that interests you? Who is the breeder? What is the pedigree?
 

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You will probably have to look out for little things, like the submissive dog being in a room and the dominant dog laying in the hall in essence trapping the submissive male. You will need to ensure the safe exit of the submissive male.

Look for little things that tend to trigger fights, doorways, food, toys, over arousal, excitement, other dogs...brush up on dog body language. If walking, keep on moving, avoid stopping or moving slowly. It's probably doable with some effort.
Excellent points. Pay attention OP.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
How about another angle what is it about a dog in Europe that interests you? Who is the breeder? What is the pedigree?
It’s a czech importer/breeder.
I’m attracted to their lineage and pups but I don’t want an 8 week old puppy at home and he has 0 females available.
another breeder has a female available similar circumstances but she’s almost double the price (from Europe as well)
 

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I think fixing your current male will only be detrimental to his health especially as he ages. IMO, there also is a moral issue if you are doing it only so you might have fewer problems bringing in a younger male. If you are having your doubts now as to your capabilities, or your willingness to sacrifice as would be necessary if you have to crate and rotate, then maybe you should wait until your older male passes.

I have a some Czech yearlings here I imported. I am curious as to what kennel and pedigrees that has you so piqued. Could you PM them to me?
 

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The thing is you're thinking in generalities, but when you introduce a new dog it quickly becomes about specifics!

Neutering or not, who knows? But I personally wouldn't ever neuter a male dog before he's 2.

Both dogs from your description "sound" like dogs that "might" get along...but then again they might not!

So the easier answer here is find a breeder in the US that has Czech lines, lots to choose from!

And plan for contingencies should they happen! Because honestly, because dogs are all individuals, even a specific pair of male and a female dog may not work. Or it may work perfectly!

There are too many variables for anyone to say definitively. But if you want to get another dog, you should have at the very least plans A and B.

Don't get me wrong, I loved having multiple dogs too. But just be prepared! Best of luck, let us know what you decide, and by all means post pictures!!
 

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Discussion Starter #17
The thing is you're thinking in generalities, but when you introduce a new dog it quickly becomes about specifics!

Neutering or not, who knows? But I personally wouldn't ever neuter a male dog before he's 2.

Both dogs from your description "sound" like dogs that "might" get along...but then again they might not!

So the easier answer here is find a breeder in the US that has Czech lines, lots to choose from!

And plan for contingencies should they happen! Because honestly, because dogs are all individuals, even a specific pair of male and a female dog may not work. Or it may work perfectly!

There are too many variables for anyone to say definitively. But if you want to get another dog, you should have at the very least plans A and B.

Don't get me wrong, I loved having multiple dogs too. But just be prepared! Best of luck, let us know what you decide, and by all means post pictures!!
Could you PM me czech lineage breeders in US? Thanks !!
 

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Hmm...I can see what I've got. But honestly, there are quite a few. Shouldn't be too hard to track down...
 

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Are you looking for all Czech, or a mix with some Czech and some DDR, or some Czech and some WGWL?
 

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Will fixing my current male help or actually cause bigger issues?
Here is what I can say from personal experience. I have a 5 y/0 intact male who I would describe as somewhat similar to how you described your existing male. I originally intended to add another GSD, and in conversation with one breeder who is well regarded on this forum-- I was told if I were to add another male it would be risky and I should be prepared to neuter one or both at the slightest hint of trouble.

I wound up not adding a GSD after all but a lab. I got a male- not because I wanted one but because that was what was suitable for my purposes from the litter. My adult male GSD has played with neutered adult males most of his life. He can be full of it with another intact male, so I don't typically let him see them.

I had the intact male lab pup, intact adult GSD, male, and spayed senior GSD female. The adolescent lab got very flirty with the old female. She did not care but my adult male did. The whole juju in the house changed. The adult male was getting tense with the adolescent male. The younger male--lab, was 100% non confrontational with the GSD. Had the younger been another GSD I am almost certain there would have been fights. And I'm not certain their relationship would have recovered if that had happened

I agonized over whether to change management, neuter one or both males, etc, because I knew things were going south. In the end I neutered the lab at 16 mo, earlier than I had planned, and the problem immediately stopped with no further intervention from me. As soon as the lab was neutered all the tension from the big male just went away, as did the flirting behavior from the lab with the old female.

Had she not been a part of it I might have been able to see the lab thru to adulthood intact but I am not sure, there was a LOT of testosterone flying around. Things are so much calmer with the lab neutered and it was 100% the neuter because nothing else changed to speak of.

I want to add another female at some point but I plan to neuter the older male first in order to reduce conflict. I do NOT want an unsettled home where dogs fight, nor to do I want a crate and rotate life. I am in no hurry to get another dog now for a lot of reasons, not the least of which my boys are getting along really well right now and I don't want to rock the boat.
 
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