German Shepherds Forum banner

1 - 15 of 15 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
20 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Hi everyone, yesterday I bought my first GSD. He I'd almost 9 weeks we love him his temprement so far is excellent. Only problem we are having is his puppy biting but his little razor sharp teeth. I understand this is a complete norm in puppy phases I'm just curious does anyone have any tip/advice on how I can counteract this in any way. Thanks for any advice
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
784 Posts
Redirect with a toy, fluffy and good sized works well. Provide appropriate things to chew on and appropriate exercise as an outlet. Biting will pass with maturity. Some puppies are more bitey than others and some really enjoy it so if they think it is a game because you yell and "fight" back some will get more intense and really turn on. Always keep a toy on hand and make a note of when your puppy is most likely to bite and be prepared. Some will also get bitey when they are tired and need a nap so crating is your friend.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
20 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
Thanks for that I appreciate it. I have a crate I'm using at the minute. He just crys the whole time he's in it at the minute so just waiting for that to pass. I've had dogs before but never a GSD so just getting used to his ways. Thanks again
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
784 Posts
Thanks for that I appreciate it. I have a crate I'm using at the minute. He just crys the whole time he's in it at the minute so just waiting for that to pass. I've had dogs before but never a GSD so just getting used to his ways. Thanks again

My last pup was not happy about being crated, but with time he got use to it. Stuffed kongs can help distract them and also crating in a room you are in so they don't feel abandoned.



Sarah Stremming did a podcast about Happy Crating that has some good tips and is ONE method to helping dogs accept crating.
https://thecognitivecanine.com/blog/happy-crating/
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
15,884 Posts
OK look up "crate games" Implement the same. Your puppy, if this is done "right", will love going into the crate. Maybe there will be a need to work up to longer periods (as in more than 30 seconds) in the crate but.... I've had great success with the last one on crate games. (Other stuff not so much but crate games, yes!)


On biting - tug toys help a lot, too.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
267 Posts
Hi everyone, yesterday I bought my first GSD. He I'd almost 9 weeks we love him his temperament so far is excellent. Only problem we are having is his puppy biting but his little razor sharp teeth.
Welcome to the forum & Congrats on the new puppy!

I hope your puppy time is fun and that those razor sharp teeth don't do too much damage. The previous advise given, "to offer toys and chews to deter chewing on you", is good advice. I hope it works for you.

My rowdy puppy, Cassie, is 7 months old now. Thankfully, she has her big girl teeth and is almost done with teething (but not with chewing on me). She has been very rowdy and an extreme naughty nibbler. Those razor-sharp baby teeth can do some damage.

I've read where some people recommended tug-a-war with puppies. With, Cassie, I had to avoid tug-a-war for a few months. She had a natural tendency to want to play tug-a-war with clothing (pant legs, sleeves, edges of sweaters, etc.). I have several damaged articles of clothing.

I have a crate I'm using at the minute. He just crys the whole time he's in it at the minute so just waiting for that to pass.
There is a stuffed animal you can get that has a heart beat. Many people report it can be helpful to comfort a puppy in it's crate. You can find one at pet stores or online sources. I've seen them at Chewy.com or Amazon.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
116 Posts
bitting

Even with his toys, my puppy bit me once and I screamed (yelped)bloody murder and bit him back, that was the end of biting stage. Learned thatfrom trainers a long time ago.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
55 Posts
Train bite inhibition the same way you train your sits, downs and stays. Bit of kibble in your fist, move your closed fist around pup's head, mouth, neck etc. If he tries to bite, pull hand back. Reward with the kibble when he doesn't bite.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
20 Posts
Discussion Starter #9
Thanks for all that everyone. Im currently working at the biting. Having a really issue with the crating. He cries none stop when hes in it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
774 Posts
Thanks for all that everyone. Im currently working at the biting. Having a really issue with the crating. He cries none stop when hes in it.

You'll have to learn to tough it out when he's whining/crying......they all eventually get tired-quit whining and go to sleep other wise the crate will become useless....when you let him out because he's noisy all he learns is.....whine loud and long enough...I get released
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
221 Posts
Thanks for all that everyone. Im currently working at the biting. Having a really issue with the crating. He cries none stop when hes in it.
I'm sure you will get a lot of different responses on how to handle crying in the crate but here's what I was taught and has worked for me. This is sort of a combination of teaching a puppy to be quiet in their crate and to learn a Quiet command.

Step 1) Hopefully you already did this but the crate should be a sanctuary and a magical place where only positive things happen. Leave the door(s) open and lure your puppy into the crate with (tiny) treats. Let them wander out. When they leave the treats stop. Lure them back in with treats. After they are comfortable, slowly start closing the door, repeating as necessary. End with the door shut but don't walk away. Open the door and take the puppy outside and have a play session. Repeat this whole process a few times a day until they understand.

Step 1.5) This isn't a step really but a reminder. Never use the crate as means of correction. Never use the crate as a time out place. Never ever do the proverbial throw the puppy in the crate with a "YOU WILL STAY THERE AND THINK ABOUT WHAT YOU DID!" Puppies are not kids and will not understand any of that. They will just pick up you are angry from your body language and tone of voice and learn when you are angry they got locked up in the crate. I once dropped a casserole right out of the oven, sending hot food mixed with shards of hot pottery all over the kitchen floor. I panicked, assuming my dog at the time would already be running up to eat the mix and seriously hurt himself. I looked around to stop him. The loud noise scared him and he was in his crate looking at me with wide eyes. He was older and honestly never used his crate at that point--free rein of the house when I was gone. But he remembered it was his safe place and exploding casserole dishes were scary enough to make him run there again. It was an annoying clean up for me but I felt better knowing he had learned his crate was a haven from all things bad and scary.

Step 2) Have the crate nearby but not right next to you. Make sure the pup has been outside and doesn't need to do their business. If the puppy cries, ignore them. No "It's OK girl" or "Who's a good boy?" Ignoring is really really hard for the human. When the puppy stops crying--this could take a while--walk over to the crate, let the puppy out, go outside, play, treat, etc. You are teaching crying=get ignored, quiet=leaving the crate, attention, going outside, toys, treats, and fun. Really hard to do, really effective.

Step 3) To add the Quiet command, start adding this step. Put the crate inside a room with a door. Close the door most of the way. Sit outside the door with a handful of treats. Ignore the crying but pay attention. The moment the crying stops--again this may take a loooooong time--get up, go into the room, and give a treat while saying the command word. "Quiet. Goooood quiet." Give treats without letting the puppy out. If they stay quiet, repeat the command word and keep treating. If they start crying again, say nothing, go outside, close the door, sit down and wait again. My current dog picked this up really quickly. If they are starting to get it without much wait you can go inside with a Quiet, treat, and then combine Step 2--take them out of their crate, outside, play, etc.

Like I said my current dog learned Quiet and to generally be quiet in her crate very well using this method. If I get her to bark (using a command) and then say "Quiet" mid-bark she will actually swallow the bark and be quiet. I was told once if you want to control a behavior train both sides of it. She knows when to bark and be loud, she knows when to be quiet. It just becomes another fun thing we do together like sit, down, and tug.

I know that was long but you seem like you are in that what-did-I-do phase that hits most puppy owners at one point. Hope it helps.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
20 Posts
Discussion Starter #12
Excellent thanks for the advice. Hes going outside for the toilet 99% of the time now so I think that's nearly over. I have been trying a bit crate training today and il see how that goes tonight. Its only his third night here so I'm expecting him to still be unsettled. I've been reading about the land shark phase which supposedly lasts a good while so il trying to teach me 3 year old and 5 year old to tell him no and walk away when he nips. Which is easier said than done lol. Thanks again everyone
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
20 Posts
Discussion Starter #13
Quick update everyone. Last night went noticeably smoother after playing with him in the crate yesterday. He was quiet until about 4am so I got up and let him out for the toilet. I'm just wondering does anyone know if I should be letting him bite me and then letting him know when he bites too hard? Or just trying to completely knock biting on the head altogether. I've no problem with play fighting with him to teach him his own strength however my only concern is if I teach him play biting is ok be may scare the kids by nipping them. Any advice would be much appreciated thanks
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
123 Posts
Quick update everyone. Last night went noticeably smoother after playing with him in the crate yesterday. He was quiet until about 4am so I got up and let him out for the toilet. I'm just wondering does anyone know if I should be letting him bite me and then letting him know when he bites too hard? Or just trying to completely knock biting on the head altogether. I've no problem with play fighting with him to teach him his own strength however my only concern is if I teach him play biting is ok be may scare the kids by nipping them. Any advice would be much appreciated thanks
At this young of an age, I'd try and avoid letting him bite you for learning purposes because he may end up learning its an acceptable behavior. Then when he is older, it will be that much more difficult to correct. Try to divert the biting to a toy or a wet face cloth that is rolled up and frozen.



But on the other hand, letting him allow you to place your hands in or near his mouth will be beneficial when he is older, so that you can check his teeth, gums, etc and also remove an object he shouldn't be chewing on. My Marley wanted to chew everything she could get a hold of outside...twigs, mulch, bugs etc and I was constantly removing those objects. It's a fine line with these pups sometimes, but I was finally able to put my hand in her mouth while playing and she knew just how much force to apply with her teeth without breaking the skin. While some may not agree with this approach, I found it very useful in building trust between the 2 of us. ie: I wouldn't hurt her and she wouldn't hurt me
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
36 Posts
Try interacting with him and when he doesnt bite, reward with treats. When he does bite, say no and if he continues leave him alone for a while. He will learn that biting causes you to leave and he will get no rewards.
 
1 - 15 of 15 Posts
Top