German Shepherds Forum banner

1 - 6 of 6 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
2 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I have a 8 month old Female German Shepard puppy. I got her when she was 1 month old. Our beagle was there before her and is about 3yrs old. The GS has attacked the beagle about 3 times in different instance. 1 time she was out side and saw the beagle eating a piece of cereal that had fallen on the floor; she attacked him when she came in. Another time the beagle was barking at something and she attached him. This last time a piece of bread was given to each dog and the beagle was throw and thrashed around by the Shepard. My wife and daughter had to pull her off of the beagle in fear of the shepherd killing the beagle, the beagle was bleeding. 99% of the time the dogs get along and she tries to get him to play with her. Confused and worried about the Shepard's nature. Seems like she just snaps into an attack mode and attacks the beagle. She is very sweet to the whole family and we are all very attached to her. When the beagle is not around she looks for him and checks all of the rooms for him. I want to keep her, just don't want her to kill the beagle.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
24,301 Posts
I'll ask once so we don't have to say it in every subsequent post
-did you really get your German Shepherd at four weeks?

If so, then for all I will say that is too young, there is a lot that happens in those next four weeks that teach a dog how to be a dog. And hope we can leave it at that-and for anyone reading this thread who wonders why, definitely post or start a new thread for sure.


If not, when did you get her?

And then on to what do we do from here-because everything else is water under the bridge! What can we do (classes, re-teaching of certain dog behaviors and how, NILIF, crate and rotate, exercise, etc.) to help this become a safe and healthy situation for all involved?
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
27,460 Posts
Great news your pup was about 7 weeks old when you got it, that's a help.

There is no 'sudden' about these attacks. It's happened 3 times and it's an issue that must be addressed. As you've seen, these fights can be serious, even deadly.

Management is key for the time being. Always you are with the beagle so you can protect and not let the bully GSD keep the fear/stress going. Not fair to your older dog if you allow a bully to take advantage. As the 'boss' in the house, you have to step in BEFORE the fight starts. It's not up to your GSD to start a fight like the decision is theirs. It is YOUR house, you are in charge and there are behaviors you should expect and hold your dog to.

In the mean time I'd WAY up the exercise for the GSD. Outside the house. Swimming, running, hiking, ball chasing, socialization, hours of exercise and MENTAL stimulation outside the home. Give that GSD something else interesting in it's life besides finding an opportunity to pick on a smaller dog.

And dog obedience classes. These classes are NOT about the perfect sit or down (though that's an added benefit). And it doesn't matter that my dogs are perfect when alone in the house in the kitchen. Are they also just as fast and obedient when we are out and about in front of the Walmart? Or are my dogs (so perfect at home) suddenly unfocused and apparently deaf?

For my dogs to REALLY learn and REALLY listen they have to respect me as a leader and behave in spite of distractions. The best way I've learned to do this is have a professional teach me. Only about 25% of dog classes are about teaching the 'dog'. The other 75% is about teaching ME to teach my dog. When I do it right, my dogs learn (go figure) and when I don't they keep doing the same BAD BEHAVIORS they've been doing all along.

Dog aggression is serious and we must act pro-actively to prevent future problems. They don't get better otherwise. Only worse. But I've found when I DO make changes in the home and in MY behavior and training (dog classes) my dog's also change. And for the better.

Here's some stuff to read that may help while you are searching for those good classes:

http://www.flyingdogpress.com/aggressionbasics.html

http://www.cal.net/~pamgreen/family_feuds.html

http://www.wonderpuppy.net/canwehelp/1dbaggression.php

Showing your beagle that you are taking charge and going to step in to stop the bullying is important. So this leadership is important for BOTH dogs:

http://www.flyingdogpress.com/leadership.html

http://www.flyingdogpress.com/relationshipbased.html
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
46 Posts
I'm no pro at handling my dog yet, but we have another dog in the house and what we have done is let alex know that the other dog molly is the dominant dog. When molly gets on the bed alex has to get down, molly gets to get her food first that sort of thing. It works 99% of the time, but alex still gets mad at molly when molly goes near her stuff. Then i just take it away and she is fine. I have been doin this for a few weeks and it seems to have been working pretty good.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
964 Posts
This is my big fear. We have a five pound dog that right now runs the show. I am afraid one doay the shepherd is going to realize he doesn't have to take the abuse. I try to step in and not let the little dog be so pushy. It is kinda hard to figure when they are playing and when the little dog is pissed.

My shepherd is 9 mnths old so we are at about the same stage.

Wish I had answers for you.
 
1 - 6 of 6 Posts
Top