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Hello Everyone,


I want to know what is this case called, What are reasons behind it, How could it affect my dog and How to cure or fix it?

The dog age is 9 months, gender is male and weight is almost 30 kg.

Thank you.
 

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Hard to see anything in the picture - are you referring to weak pasterns? A picture of your dog standing, taken from the side, showing his feet and lower legs will help.
 

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Looks completely normal. Your dog has very good feet, pasterns are looking nice and strong. What exactly are you concerned about?
 

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Sometimes hard floors makes them slide. How old is your dog? If he is like one year old, his chest will fill out and straighten the legs. I would not worry about it unless he limps. We humans don't always stand elegantly either.
 

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if anything the dog's pasterns are too straight .

there should be some angulation so that the load bearing front has some flex which allows for impact absorption when landing on front (jumping) and for rapid changes of direction .

this front is terrier like .

I do see some swelling , no lets not call it swelling because that usually is soft tissue , lets look at this as a bowing out or a slight curvature of the forelimb just about the carpus (wrist) involving the area where the radius and ulna meet.

In the picture where he is sitting you can see a bumping out or thickening of the "wrist" on the inside of the leg , moreso on his left leg.

That merging of the radius and ulna with the carpus is where there would be a growth plate. The leg grows from the ends .

When there is some trauma -- either due to poor conformation for function, or excessive pounding exercise at too young an age -- soft growth plate gets bruised and closes too early .

The radius and ulna are still growing , but not at that end of the forelimb so the bone develops into this curve - the foot deviates outward.

Your dog has a minor deviation so not a great concern but take this into consideration when exercising him -- not an endurance type activity and no abrupt twists and turns . Not because he can't do them but you want to prevent damage , inflammation , and eventually arthritic changes .

Consider anti inflammatory foods as part of the diet .

Can you do a full side view of your dog?
 

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the conformation of the leg / pasterns is genetic --

the SLIGHT deviation from true and straight is not -- this is environmental / nutritional

a much much worse scenario is the downed- pastern , which is genetic
 
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