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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi all, I was wondering if anyone knew about the Parvo virus, or any other diseases that foxes might carry. We have a LOT of foxes that run around our garden at night and up and down our roads trying to get in the trash. My concern is that when I get my pup he may be exposed to something before he gets his second lot of shots (he will be 10 weeks when we get him). Should I be worried about taking him out to pee?:crazy:
 

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I once had a dog who got mange from a fox, the fox decided to sleep in his outside kennel in his doghouse, and well one morning when I let the dogs out, they sorta 'met'...had a tussle, a week later Jake came down with mange, and the closest we could figure out was from the fox.

I would be very careful and make sure your puppy definately does not eat any fox feces
 

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I have the same issues as you, I also am loaded with coyotes, they tramp right through the yard and drives my dog nuts!

What I did was (it's a pain in the rear) before the dog has all it's shots, I would walk your property and look for any animal feces (a lot of coyote poop) and clean it up the best you can, and I would put the dog on a leash for bathroom breaks until you feel comfortable.
 

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Foxes can carry rabies, so one more thing to be aware of.

Along with *****, Opossums, Chipmunks, Squirrels, Coyotes, Bobcats, Rabbits and whatever else is roaming around out there.

There was an incident a couple of years ago in a town called Honesdale PA (near me) that a little boy was waiting for the school bus and was attacked by a rabid Bobcat, he is ok and they found the cat and found out it was rabid.
 

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The two that come to mind as most likely would be distemper and rabies. The rabies issue is most easily avoidable by keeping your dog from direct contact with the foxes - which is advisable anyway as foxes are not going to be welcoming and the resulting fight can create serious injuries even without the issue of rabies.
Your dog could contract distemper while sniffing around an area where an infected animal has eliminated, sneezed, etc - basically spread a bodily fluid. That, to me, makes it more of a concern as it isn't as simple as keeping your dog from coming into contact with the animal itself and you never know who/what has left a body fluid in any given place.
At the end of the day, as long as you take reasonable precautions you will minimize this concern. Preventing direct contact between your dog and the wildlife in your area will go a long way to protect him not only from disease but the risk of injury from any resulting fights.
We have foxes, raccoons, skunks, opossums, rabbits, squirrels and tons of other wildlife that are often right up at our doorstep. I just make sure that I don't take the dog out off-leash during the dark hours as that is when an encounter is most likely so I am most able to prevent a tussle. There is no preventing the wildlife, but you can minimize all the risks.
 

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A 2 year old pup of mine lived on a property that had alot of foxes and raccoons - even though vaccinated as recommended, the dog ended up contracting distemper at about 18 months old....he was put down due to the progressive nature of the disease at 25 months....yes, it was DEFINITIVELY diagonsed (thousands and thousands of dollars worth of vet bills - including by a UP VHUP board certified neurologist!)

The theory was that he came accross the virus from fox or raccoon feces/urine perhaps on a track, or just playing ball in a field....

It was a horrible, heart wrenching experience for the owner - and for me too....was a super super puppy, tremendously loved....

So be very very very careful with your puppy!!!!!!!!!!! And DO NOT SKIP or let your vaccinations go overdue on youngsters!!!!

Lee
 

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Squirrels and rabbits too? Scary! TONS of squirrels and rabbits around here.
I'm not saying they all have it I'm saying they all can get it and pass it on.

I love country living but It appears there is more they can get into. I love going on hikes and taking the dog with me but I always catch her just being a dog lol, she's eating poop, eating sticks, weeds, bushes, sticking her head into holes that I have no idea what's in them ughhhhhh crazy dogs.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Thanks for all the replies guys. The distemper really gives me the heebijeebies! Rabies is not routinely given here in the Uk as it is not present, you have to request it and only normally if you are travelling out of the UK. Will make sure I pick up any poop lying around as well. My neighbours cats on all four sides love to use my immaculate garden beds for a toilet so I will have to clean up those as well. I think I may spray a low concentrate of bleach all around the yard too. I have a brand new knap sack sprayer, so it would not take me very long...or am I just being really paranoid here?
 

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Funny how this thread came up. I was on the phone with Debbi (DHarmas Mom) the other day and I happened to notice outside on the back hill a fox sitting there watching Chance romping around. I brought him in immediately and then watched the fox sit there for about a minute and then it turned and walked away.
I am assuming the fox was wondering why that dog was acting like it was insane rolling around in the snow.
 

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Squirrels and rabbits too? Scary! TONS of squirrels and rabbits around here.
Ultimately, rabies can be contracted from/carried by ANY mammal. There are hundreds of things that can happen to our pets (and us too) - the key is to take reasonable precaution, but not to live your entire life in fear of all the things that "might" happen -- if you do that you miss out on living. Keeping your dog from having direct contact with wildlife (keeping them leashed or having good solid control when off leash to prevent chase/capture of wildlife, not allowing them to interact with dead wildlife, not allowing them to consume wildlife droppings - granted you can see where an animal may have urinated or left other body fluids, etc) will give you a good start w/out creating a situation where you and your dog stay inside and never go anywhere.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
What about Lepto? I would think that would be a concern as well?
Fortunately Lepto is rather rare here in the UK, im not saying it does not occur, but it is far less of a worry than Parvo for instance.

I intend for my pup to be very social, he will be with me at work around lots of people in and out all day. Im the boss so I will controll how and whom he meets:D

Some sound advice given here for sure! I will just have to be vigilant but not neurotic!

I think mange would be rather a concern... the foxes here in London are generally in a SHOCKING condition, and we have a lot of them running rouge. I actually feel sorry for them in a way. Not to sorry for them though, there was a case not so long ago where a fox attacked a pair of twins while they where sleeping in there crib. One little baby ended up in ICU.
 
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