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And big ones, at that, this is for people who travel alot with their multiple big dogs. What do you have in mind if you ever are out in the middle of nowhere, and you get stranded? I am looking to get ideas, as I travel alot now with the girls, and I am wondering what I would do, should something bad, like loosing the engine or transmission happen in the Southwind. Back in the day when it was Maxie and me, we just called the towtruck, towtruck came, and away we went. I would need a huge towtruck for the motorhome, and I would have to worry about the dogs getting too hot or cold, and God forbid, what would I do, if I had to leave it on the side of the road overnight? I am considering a towbar, so I can pull the Aveo along, but in winter, I am usually pulling the Arctic Cat on its trailer. Its just one more thing, my over-active imagination worries about.
 

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I look at it like this you could be broke down late at night in the mountains snowing,cold,dark.no cell service & no GSD
 

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I haven't traveled with multiple large dogs but I did travel with a large dog and a smallish dog.
I also had the car break down once when my family was traveling with my Golden Retriever Ginger. It was not a good situation. It was the middle of the summer and we were driving out of Wisconsin on the highway towards home when the car broke down. I ended up sitting with Ginger on the side of the highway under a small tree (semi-shady) that happened to be nearby, because it was too hot in the car. A highway patrol car stopped and offered to give us a ride to the nearest garage but he would not let Ginger in his car! So we ended up having one person go get the tow truck while the other two people waited with the car and dog. When the tow truck finally came the driver was very nice and helped to boost Ginger into his huge cab. We were luckily able to find a motel near the garage that allowed dogs as the car would not be ready until the next day.

I think probably the best people to ask about it if you have a motor home would be show or Schutzhund people? I know at dog shows there are usually a lot of people who have RVs and multiple dogs.
 

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Crates, leashes and collars, water and bowls, tarps and maybe a list of dog friendly motels along your route would be the most that I think you can do. Cold is a lot less of a threat to our GSD's (provided they have basic dry shelter from the wind) than heat is. For that, the water and tarps work quite well. More hotels/motels accept dogs than you would think. We love traveling with our two, and would love it even more with an RV. We just have the suburban, which is close enough
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We travel with our three kids all the time. The three have varied throughout the years. At one point it was our 85 lb GSD, our 60 lb dog and 40 lb dog. Then it was our GSD, 40 lb dog and 20 lb dog. Size doesn't matter so much because a lot of tow truck drivers don't allow dogs in their cabs. Some do, but a lot don't. So I don't count on it.

About 1/2 the time, we travel in our SUV with a Yakima space case on top, about half the time, in our RV. We carry Triple-A coverage on both of these, so that we don't have to worry about getting a tow relatively quickly. Frankly, that's the last thing I want to worry about if we're stuck. (We don't tow a vehicle).

In addition to what's on John's list, I bring a tent and sleeping bags. And I always bring at least at least a week's worth of Zamboni's medicines (and anything else that might be hard to find in the middle of nowhere) on top of what we need for our trip. I figure that one of us could go into town (or call) for a rental vehicle. Anymore, a lot of rental car companies will come pick you up (it's not just Enterprise that does), so you wouldn't necessarily have to leave the dogs. That does depend where you are. If you're in the middle of the Yukon or Nowhere, Montana, you might have to leave them in your MH while you make arrangements to get out of there.

If the weather is very cold, then I bring 0 and less rated sleeping bags, a tent, and extra food. If the weather is hot, then I pack the tent, more water and cooler bags that will serve mostly as padding on the ground.

I don't ever count on being able to find a hotel that will take us in. In some regions, it's really hard to find dog friendly hotels, and even if you do, they may only accept small dogs, or only one dog. So I always pack a good 4-season tent. It might be chilly, but I've withstood some pretty bad weather in that tent with good sleeping bags (actually choosing to, recreationally), so I know that we'll be ok.

As a risk manager, I'm like you. I always expect the worst and try to plan for it. Dh and I have had some unfortunate things happen on the road both separately and together. But because we've done a bit of advanced planning, they turned out ok. (And made great stories afterward.
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Finally, you might want to look at Good Sam's Continued Service Plan which gives coverage for your MH, especially on-the-road incidents like this. Also, FMCA has a benefit where members all over N. America have offered to provide mechanical assistance (people who are mechanically qualified) and others have offered to let park overnight at their homes. I presume folks like this would allow you to pitch a tent in their yards for a day or two, if need be, while your coach is getting repaired or until you can make other arrangements. They're kind of handy, especially for someone who is travelling alone.

Slightly off topic, but FMCA offers a benefit of medical evacuation coverage if you get sick on the road, which includes transporting your pets back home. Good Sam does offer a towing option, like AAA, that you can upgrade to.

So you may want to look at those two groups. They provide some handy benefits even if you never have an emergency, and they're rather affordable.
 
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