German Shepherds Forum banner

1 - 14 of 14 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
3 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Hello! I am a first time breeder, I decided to breed my 1 1/2 yr old German shepherd and would like some advice. She is a first time mother as well which makes me nervous because I've only ever seen kittens born when I was a child. I have done quite a lot of research and readinging on the subject to better prepare myself for the responsibility that is to come but would like some more reassurance from real life people. I am worried Sadie (my female) won't know what to do when the time comes for her to whelp. Also I would like opinions on a bedding for her? Does she whelp on a blanket or in a box? How often should I bring her to the vet? Do I help her clean the pups when they come out? What about prenatal vitamins/supplements? Help!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,084 Posts
Has she been bred already? Did you research bloodlines? Have her hips and elbows been evaluated? The hips as elbows for the sire you have in mind? Do you have buyers already for the litter? If she has not been bred already (I hope not, she is still a puppy herself), at what age did you plan on breeding her?

There are resources on this board you should read before you make a decision to breed her. Please re-think this, there are too many GSDs in rescue and too many who will never be rescued, as a result of careless breeding.

Susan
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
Hi Susan, I thank you for your post. If I did breed her, I do have three puppies that have homes already (people in the family that love GSDs and Sadie). She would be a first time mom as I would be a first time breeder. I did do some digging and have found a potential male that has certification for his hips and a certification for his eyes.. Sadie does as well. I never really gave breeding a thought until everyone I come across while walking her or when I bring her to family outings ask if I am going to because they want one of her offsprings. I do understand that there a lot of dogs out there that need rescuing and I frequently donate resources as well as my time at these shelters. I am not looking to breed as a hobby or as a means of living, but as an amazing experience. I am still undecided whether I want to proceed or not, because I know their are risks not only to my girl but to the babies as well
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,904 Posts
Find a GSD club. Go there. Learn about the breed, the prior characteristics a dog should have that make them breed worthy. Find a mentor.

A dog should not be bred because people on the street say she is pretty dog.

Dogs that are bred should be the best representatives of the breed, temperament, drive and health above all else.

At 18 months, your girl can not yet have her hips and elbows certified. That can't be fine until 2. Unless you went through the SV or PennHIP. With the many orthopedic problems in the breed, you should want to ensure that you are not contributing knowingly to the problem.

Are you prepared to lose her in whelp? Are you prorated to pay for an emergency c-section? Are you prepared to take back any puppy that you bring into the world? If the owner can care for it anymore?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,428 Posts
Find a GSD club. Go there. Learn about the breed, the prior characteristics a dog should have that make them breed worthy. Find a mentor.

A dog should not be bred because people on the street say she is pretty dog.

Dogs that are bred should be the best representatives of the breed, temperament, drive and health above all else.

At 18 months, your girl can not yet have her hips and elbows certified. That can't be fine until 2. Unless you went through the SV or PennHIP. With the many orthopedic problems in the breed, you should want to ensure that you are not contributing knowingly to the problem.

Are you prepared to lose her in whelp? Are you prorated to pay for an emergency c-section? Are you prepared to take back any puppy that you bring into the world? If the owner can care for it anymore?
This this this. I feel you have a lot more research to do before you even consider breeding. And even with the three people who want a puppy, do you really feel they are ready for the responsibility of raising, training, and exercising a GSD pup? Are they ready for the mouthing, the barking, the high energy, the intelligence to get into trouble? Do you really feel they want a GSD or do you think they just want a nice free puppy from you?

I know you said something about wanting the experience. There's a very real chance that experience could be losing your dog during the whelping process. It's a risk every time a dog whelps.

Do you feel your dog is objectively a good representative of the breed? Are you working any performance titles with her? Have you done anything official that demonstrates sound nerve and temperament? Has any of this been done with the prospective sire?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
19,451 Posts
You can have this experience without putting your dog at risk. Join a GSD club, befriend some experienced breeders as mentors. You can assist with a delivery and help do early stim and socialize the puppies. Most breeders I know have people they know and trust who can be involved in raising a litter.

I also agree that people wanting a puppy should not be the only reason to breed. You can refer them to your dog's breeder or show them her pedigree if they are interested in those lines. Your dog should be evaluated for breedworthiness by those with experience, like entering a Schutzhund trial or a conformation show. If you can gain some mentors, they can help evaluate your dog. Maybe she is breeding quality but that should be determined first before using her for an experience.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3 Posts
Discussion Starter #7
Pax8- Sadie and the male (diesel) are both akc registered. Her father and her grandmother Have state titles (forgive me, I'm not sure what ones exactly unless I looked at the papers again). He is three years of age with the hip and eye certification and sadies parents both had the certifications as well (although she is too young herself to get the tests... I'm not 100% sure how that all works). They are both wonderfully tempered, they both have never risen a lip at anybody before, great with children and smarter than any dog I've ever come accross! Lol like I said, I'm not out to hurt the breed standard or anything, just looking for some advice. I do know risks are involved and that's why I am on the fence about breeding Sadie. I have raised calfs and kids (baby goats) before so I am prepared for the time and responsibility whelping puppies presents
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9,437 Posts
I wasn't going to reply to this because I thought you had already bred her.

If you research this forum, you will find so many threads on breeding dogs just because they are a good pet.

I urge you to look at them.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9,855 Posts
Also keep in mind that many who want a puppy out of your dog change their minds when that time comes closer and they realize what they are in for. That's why breeders ask deposits to sift these impulses out.
You can also refer them to Sadie's breeder if they like her so much. I love my Deja but for another GSD I would not breed her but go back to her breeder for a new pup as I know he knows what he is doing and not have the responsibility of a litter.
 

·
Administrator & Alpha Bitch of the Wild Bunch
Joined
·
13,571 Posts
I would not breed a 1.5 year old dog. While she is physically capable, she is not mentally mature nor is she a full adult herself, or old enough for her breeding credentials. I wouldn't breed until 2 years old at minimum, as that is the age at which hips and elbows can be certified through OFA. Personally though, I prefer to wait until a female is around 3 years old to start breeding as I have found that they are more mature and settled and better able to take on motherhood at 3 than they are at 2.

If you want to breed her, spend the next year or two, at minimum, and learn about the breed. Get her hips and elbows certified. That her parents were certified is not good enough. She must be tested herself once she turns 2 years old. Get involved in a training club and train with her so that you are able to learn more about what proper GSD temperament should be and also get to know her better and in ways other than what you can at home to get a better idea of whether or not she really does have a breeding suitable temperament, and try to get some sort of performance titles on her to prove that. Look at doing some temperament tests like the TT or TC where she can be evaluated by an independent, objective person.

I'm sure she is a very nice dog. But being a nice dog alone does not make a dog a breed worthy dog. Nor of course does it prepare you for the responsibility of being a breeder which goes far beyond just whelping and raising and caring for a healthy litter of puppies. It starts with knowing the genetics of both the sire and the dam and ensuring that they are free of health and temperament problems themselves and finding mates that are good matches for one another both in their phenotype and their pedigree. She should not be bred until she is older, health certified and hopefully trained and titled and/or temperament tested in some way and this gives you time to start doing the things that you need to do to breed responsibly. If you can't breed responsibly, then please don't breed at all.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
626 Posts
I can't tell you how many people comment on my girl. She is very pretty, I admit. I've had several friends ask me if I will breed her because they want a dog just like her. I refer them to her breeder. The breeder knows what she's doing, produces wonderful puppies and does all the testing and training needed. In the future, when I want another puppy I'll go right back to my breeder.

If you want the experience. Go to your shelter, offer to foster a pregnant homeless dog and help find homes for the puppies. I bet it's not as fun or easy as it seems.
 

·
"I like Daffy" Moderator
Joined
·
3,276 Posts
What lines of GSD is she?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
31,874 Posts
Response in blue:

Hello! I am a first time breeder, I decided to breed my 1 1/2 yr old German shepherd and would like some advice.

If you have not bred her already, you should wait until she is over two and can have her own x-rays done. Just because her sire and dam are fine, does not mean she is. And she will be more mature over 2 years old.

She is a first time mother as well which makes me nervous because I've only ever seen kittens born when I was a child.
I have never seen kittens born, but the concept is probably pretty similar. Lots of liquid, lots of goo, lots of waiting, at the edge of your seat, being nervous.

I have done quite a lot of research and readinging on the subject to better prepare myself for the responsibility that is to come but would like some more reassurance from real life people.
GSDs come out pretty long and thin (most of the time), so (most of the time), a young, healthy, strong bitch can manage the whelping without incident, most of the time. What you need to educate yourself on, is how to recognize when your bitch is straying into the some-of-the-time situations. Sometimes a bitch will stop the process with pups still in her, sometimes she will not start, sometimes a pup will get stuck. You need to be able to recognize when your bitch is in distress so you can get her the help you need, without jumping the gun and panicking.

I am worried Sadie (my female) won't know what to do when the time comes for her to whelp.
A bitch's instinct is strong. She will probably amaze you. But, yes you need to be careful. Some bitches will get carried away pulling on umbilical chords, until intestines come out. And some flat out eat their puppies. Others ignore the puppies. It is uncommon, and 18 months, while not ideal is probably not going to specifically give you problems. Keep a close eye on her until the umbilical cords fall off.

Also I would like opinions on a bedding for her?
I use newspapers and plenty of them.

Does she whelp on a blanket or in a box?
She will whelp on your couch or bed if given the opportunity. But having a whelping box ready and a little management can encourage her to choose a more appropriate spot.

How often should I bring her to the vet?
If she has already been bred, and she has not current problems, than there is no reason to take her to a vet. Letting your vet know you're expecting, and when she goes into labor will help him have the heads up if there are problems.

Do I help her clean the pups when they come out?
I always do.

What about prenatal vitamins/supplements?
I feed a good food and up the quantity, but do not give the dog calcium supplements, if you do, continue them throughout the lactating, once they are all weaned, you can back it off.

Help!
 
1 - 14 of 14 Posts
Top