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Anyone have experience with this procedure? I explained the new member forum how I got my dog, Skeeter, but to make it short, I rescued him from up in the hills when he was about 8 months old. I noticed shortly after that he would limp once in a while on his left rear leg. I took him in to have it checked and he has a broken hip. After a surgeon looked the x-rays he called and talked to me about the FHO. However it was gonna be $1700! So, the surgeon said that if the dog is doing ok, then I wouldn't have to worry about it right now. But, he said, in the future it will have to be dealt with. This was about 2 1/2 years ago. I'm thinking that I'm gonna go ahead and have it done. Skeeter does fine.He's very active. Loves to run and chase tennis balls. He's actually a **** fast runner! It seems like he is having some issues with it. I can just tell when something is bothering him. ANd lately he hesitates before jumping into my truck. Sometimes he won't jump and I have to lift him up. And my truck isn't very high. My wife noticed about a week ago that his right upper leg (thigh?) is much bigger than the other side. I'd never noticed this before. I always watch his hips and his feet and his hips when he is walking, etc.

So here is the x-ray from back then.

557501
 

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Oh, forgot the link,

 

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I don't think older dogs are good candidates for this surgery....usually it is done to youngsters

Lee
 

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Our rescue's vet has done this procedure quite a few times for dogs that we had in foster care. They all came through it beautifully. Recovery is a lot of work -- there is a point where you have to get them using the leg eventually, putting weight on it, and they never want to. There are daily exercises that have to be done...kind of like PT for a human. However, once the recovery was done, every one of the dogs that I know of was better off than before, as the pain goes away.

They'll never be athletes again after having this (as there's no joint socket afterward, just a false joint with scar tissue). However, they can live pretty normal, pain-free lives. An FHO is usually the "second best" surgical option with Total Hip Replacement (THR) usually being the "best" (but costing twice as much).

That cost seems very high to me, but I'm in a low-cost region for vetting. Is this a boarded surgeon or a regular vet?
 

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I don't think the price is that outrageous.....I know someone who had a total hip replacement on a strange hip where a break caused a huge mass of calcium on the joint....that was north of $15,000 before she was done....

The hip IS bad....but I'd get another opinion as to whether a FHO is feasible


Lee
 

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I'm not sure about the surgeon. Like I said the consult was over 2 years ago, so I don't really remember. What does boarded mean exactly?

Our rescue's vet has done this procedure quite a few times for dogs that we had in foster care. They all came through it beautifully. Recovery is a lot of work -- there is a point where you have to get them using the leg eventually, putting weight on it, and they never want to. There are daily exercises that have to be done...kind of like PT for a human. However, once the recovery was done, every one of the dogs that I know of was better off than before, as the pain goes away.

They'll never be athletes again after having this (as there's no joint socket afterward, just a false joint with scar tissue). However, they can live pretty normal, pain-free lives. An FHO is usually the "second best" surgical option with Total Hip Replacement (THR) usually being the "best" (but costing twice as much).

That cost seems very high to me, but I'm in a low-cost region for vetting. Is this a boarded surgeon or a regular vet?
 

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Boarded means a "board certified" surgeon specialist -- not a regular vet, but someone who has done years of extra residency and passed an extra exam. Most orthopedists are boarded surgeons. You may see something like "Diplomate, ACVS" (American College of Veterinary Surgeons) after "DVM" on their website or sign. They're far more expensive, but also much more specialized than most general practice vets with ortho surgery -- they're the experts on surgical fixes for orthopedic problems. Before you make any decisions, you definitely want to get a specialist's opinion on your options -- and I totally agree wit Lee on getting a second opinion.

OTOH, an FHO isn't a hard surgery, and many generalists can do them competently. It's a "salvage" operation so it's not nearly as specialized as a THR (which requires a surgeon-specialist to do).
 

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Jim.

That dog is in pain with a femor and head looking like that. DO something.

I'm guessing the dog is between 3 and 3.5 years of age, evidenced by your post. He's surely not old and would fit squarely into an acceptable age to have the FHO done.

I had the FHO done in 1999 on an 8 month old male that I had at the time. My vet quoted me about $1500 back then.

Long story short, it did not require an over night stay. When I brought him home, he immediately went through my home and down three deck steps outside to relieve himself in the woods. This was barely ten hours after the operation. You'll need to monitor that type stuff, but you'll be amazed at how well he'll recover.

Your dog will NOT need physical therapy. Nonsense. With your help and attention, he will build up the muscle strength all by himself and will be fine. Recognize, he'll never be a championship Frisbee catcher, but he'll rebound.

Lastly, the operation went so well that my vet only charged me $500 dollars, instead of the $1500 quoted. He said it took him about 45 minutes and the $1500 would have been way excessive.

Maybe I had the right vet; maybe I had the right dog; I don't know. It was surely the best thing that I ever did for my boy, Damian.

I put him down in early 2012 at about 12.5 years of age.

Best of luck to you and your pup.
 

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Jim.

That dog is in pain with a femor and head looking like that. DO something.

I'm guessing the dog is between 3 and 3.5 years of age, evidenced by your post. He's surely not old and would fit squarely into an acceptable age to have the FHO done.

I had the FHO done in 1999 on an 8 month old male that I had at the time. My vet quoted me about $1500 back then.

Long story short, it did not require an over night stay. When I brought him home, he immediately went through my home and down three deck steps outside to relieve himself in the woods. This was barely ten hours after the operation. You'll need to monitor that type stuff, but you'll be amazed at how well he'll recover.

Your dog will NOT need physical therapy. Nonsense. With your help and attention, he will build up the muscle strength all by himself and will be fine. Recognize, he'll never be a championship Frisbee catcher, but he'll rebound.

Lastly, the operation went so well that my vet only charged me $500 dollars, instead of the $1500 quoted. He said it took him about 45 minutes and the $1500 would have been way excessive.

Maybe I had the right vet; maybe I had the right dog; I don't know. It was surely the best thing that I ever did for my boy, Damian.

I put him down in early 2012 at about 12.5 years of age.

Best of luck to you and your pup.
Thanks for that encouragement. He doesn't seem in pain he really doesn't. Although he could be and hides it well. But,ya I'm expecting an influx of cash here soon so I'll be looking into gettin it done.
 
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