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My fiance and I have a GSD named Mysteek Piper Metz. She is true German bloodline and we are looking for another German Bloodline to breed her with. She just came into her first heat on Sat. 10/09/2010. we plan to breed her one time and that will be when she comes into her next heat. we offer pick of the litter for whoever we breed her with. She is about 70-80lbs and 15months old. Very smart very loyal and loving. anyone who isnt too far away because we dont want to have to travel too far for a male.
 

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Have you done any health testing, particularly for elbow/hip displaysia?
Any titles of any sort, such as SchH, agility, OB, etc.?

What makes you feel your bitch should be bred, aside from the fact you want one litter from her?
 

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We have made an apointment to have that double checked soon. In her contract when we baught her it states that she has a lifetime guarentee that she wont get hip displaysia but we are double checking anyway. we are going to get her completely ready for when the time comes. I dont want to breed her on her first heat. we just want to have everything ready for when the time comes. We also only plan to breed her once and then have her spayed. and please help me. I really dont know a whole lot about GSD's excypt for what I read up on before buying her. what do you mean by titles?
 

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Hip dysplasia cannot be "guaranteed". Many breeders offer some sort of guarantee but it's really more like a warranty (you get money back or a new dog). HD is a polygenic condition, it is not nearly as simple as not having it because both parents don't. It is only diagnosed or ruled out with x-rays, so your dog needs to be x-rayed by a radiologist who is familiar with how to position the dog and what they are looking at as far as HD and your dog's breed and age. You cannot get OFA certification until your dog is 24 months old.

Since the dog has not even been evaluated and has no titles (doesn't sound like you are working towards any?) I think it is very premature to be looking for potential stud dogs. How will you be able to find a stud that is a good pairing for your bitch when you don't know about her health or know her strengths and weaknesses as far as temperament and drive (since she has not been trained for titles)?

The types of studs you are going to attract with this sort of ad are probably not the type you want near your dog. Good stud dogs will not be breeding with physically and mentally immature bitches with no health certifications or titles. May sound harsh but that's reality here.

To be honest this sounds like a train wreck. You admittedly are not familiar with the breed or the titling process. What is your reasoning for becoming a breeder (yes, intentionally breeding a female means you are a breeder)? What are you hoping to produce with this litter?
 

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You can't 'guarantee' a dog won't get HD or ED, even if both parents are OFA excellent. There are plenty of dogs with OFA's parents that still get displaysia of some sort. However, by breeding two OFA'd dogs, the risk for it is reduced, but NOT eliminated.
 

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The best thing to do here is probably educate him/her about why they shouldn't be breeding that dog. She admitted she didn't know much about the breed, so the best thing we could probably do here is educate and inform if they ever come back and they're willing to listen.
 

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I'm so with GSDElsa- except mine is lasagna. To the OP I know you posted this with the best of intentions so read the breeding section on here before jumping into something you know nothing about. People breed for the breed and not just for one liter. If your female can't contribute to the breed anything that is already not there don't bother:)
 

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We also only plan to breed her once and then have her spayed.
Why breed her at all? Why not just spay her? You acknowledge that you know very little about breed - do you really think you should be breeding dogs you know nothing about?

I'm not asking these questions just to beat up on you, I'm interested in your answers.
 

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You could lose your female(and, or the pups) during the whelping if you don't know what you are doing...the next heat cycle-she won't even be two years old.
I agree with everyone else, please don't breed her, spay her after her heat cycle and don't let her out of your sight while she is in heat.
 

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I think you should really do some more research before you think of breeding.

I have no idea of her pedigree, but I've looked at your past posts, in one topic, you talk about wanting to make your dog "attack on command",,,when it sounds like she has some 'fear' issues. Another topic you talk about Iams and Science Diet being the 'best' dog food out there, many will disagree with that, you have no knowledge of what titles are.

Those things alone, tell me you need ALOT more educating when it comes to living with dogs. Find a breeder who will mentor you, be willing to learn from them, take your dog to obedience class, put some titles on her.

Is your dog in obedience classes? Is she OFA'd or do you plan on OFA'ing her? What are your plans for puppies if she is bred? Where will you find a responsible breeder to breed her to?

You know we all love our dogs, we all think they are the best thing since chocolate ice cream:),,we all think they are worthy of reproducing. However, when I read posts like these, I highly encourage the person, IF they want another dog, or one just like what they have, Go back to the breeder you got your girl from.

Just an FYI, all gsd's are descendents of "german bloodlines", and I'm not saying this to beat you up either, just some truth's.

Can you post her pedigree?? Just curious.
 

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I smell troll. But thats just me.

Otherwise I would really like to know the OP's response.
 

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She just came into her first heat on Sat. 10/09/2010. we plan to breed her one time and that will be when she comes into her next heat.

I find it hard to believe this is for real but just in case...if she just started her first heat yesterday she is probably around a year old. You want to breed her on her nextx heat which will be approximately 6 months from now. The dog won't even be two (old enough for OFA) so on top of what everyone else has stated, NO DON'T BREED THIS DOG.
 

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Not just you!
Seems to be hitting all the hot button topics. Protection training, breeding, fearful dog, dog food debate...
In short, many of the things a newbie might be interested in until they know more.

To the OP, do not be in such a hurry to breed or make this decision.

If your dog starts normal cycling, than she should come into heat at 21 months. That is good, not bad. Do not breed her on that heat. Wait three months more, 2 years, and take her to a vet known to do good x-rays.

Have them take x-rays and send them in to OFA for hips and elbows -- you want to know whether you are breeding or not. At this point she will be in the middle of her cycle and not loosened up due to her heat, etc.

Also check for Von Wilbrand's disease -- blood test, OFA thyroid and Cardiac, and while they are at it, have them CERF test her -- for the eyes.

In the mean time:

1. Join a GSD club, with real live people, hopefully some with working lines and some with show lines. Get to know them and their dogs.

2. Get into training, join a club, take her to classes, take her to shows, get her titled.

3. Research your girl's pedigree, get to know the various lines. Get to know what the dogs in her lines were like. Get to know about any accomplishments of any of these dogs.

4. Get books about the German Shepherd and read them, read books on genetics, training, nutrition, and breeding. Learn all the different things GSDs are prone to healthwise -- hip dysplasia is not the worst thing out there, but it is best known. Everyone asks about it. And what you need to do is be an expert and answer questions about all of these topics, if you want to breed dogs. Learn about what might go wrong during whelping too, the signs that everything is not right, when to go in and get an emergency c-section.

5. Find yourself a breeder -- does not have to be GSDs, but someone doing things right. Someone who shows and/or titles her dogs, someone who has plenty of experience, someone who is a member a breed specific club or training club, someone who does the appropriate health tests for her breed. Get to know this person and try to gain from her experience in whelping and raising litters. If at all possible, be present -- unlikely. Or, help to socialize the puppies after they are born.

Your girl is YOUNG, you have plenty of time to do this right. In my opinion you will still be a back yard breeder, because breeding once and then spaying, in my opinion, is not breeding toward an overall goal. If everyone bred their female just one time, we would be way overrun with with dogs in just a few years (though many people think we are there already). Reputable breeders breed to maintain the breed, they pick dogs that best match their bitches, they breed to hold back one or more and breed again, they health test, and they prove their dogs' temperament, they spend time and money on the endeavor and rarely realize any monetary gain, they put their lives into it not just their spare change and spare time.

The biggest thing is finding good homes for the puppies. Believe me, family and friends run for the hills once the puppies reach eight weeks old, people that said they wanted one, suddenly forget you exist. And while you can always get rid of them cheap through the newspaper, you will have to do a lot of time and energy to ensure that the pups are going to good, responsible homes.

Do not think that she will have two or three puppies and you will keep them all if necessary. She can have 12-14 puppies and you will up to your eyeballs in smelly newspapers and literally poop in no-time.

Good luck. The breed needs new blood, but only if they are committed to the breed and to the dogs they produce. There is a lot to learn and a lot to do, I have only chipped off the tip of the iceburg.
 

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Yes, maybe.
Its just the questions seem odd to me. Maybe I spend too much time on another forum where many of these questions are trolling.
 
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