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Discussion Starter #1
How many of you raw feeders utilise venison meat in thier dogs raw diet? I'm a hunter and have plenty on hand but right now I'm still feeding kibble but may change over to raw at some point. I have yet to read any posts on raw feeders feeding wild game meat like this yet. Just wanted some feedback on it.
 

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I would love to feed more venison, but as it is very lean, I don't think I'd feed it exclusively. Dogs do need some fat in their diet. And venison bones are usually dense, so I wouldn't use them as a raw meaty bone portion.
If I had unlimited supply, I'd feed venison several times a week, but use poultry bones for the rmb's.
I did feed a fresh venison heart and one of my dogs became ill, not sure it was the heart or something else, but from now on, I'll freeze any organ from wild game for a week or two before feeding.
 

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Me! The problem with wild game is it is not legal to sell so hard to come by. I beg part from everyone during hunting season...heart, liver, kidney! Don't throw those away. I do have a pretty good source but forgot to call last year. We got about 800# a couple years ago.
 

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I do when I can : ) But definitely not as a main source, because as mentioned the meat is very lean.

But also keep in mind, you should feed more than one meat source if you're feeding raw. (I prefer to feed no less than three different types of meat myself)

I just have Elk burger right now as far as wild game goes, but I got my tag so I'll be going for my own this year.
 

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So lucky!! I would LOVE to have access to venison but just to use in the rotation as you should several protein sources per week ( from all the advice I have gotten over the years anyway). It is awesome for them and my Elsa's fav was the heart. Use whatever you have access to as it is very good for them :)


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It's great, just make sure you freeze it for a month to kill any parasites that might be in the meat.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
I understand one of the reasons people feed raw was the fact that your basically resorting back to what they were designed to be fed on. But if thats the case, I'm not understanding why the mixture of different meats.

By the way thanks for all the input too.
 

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Variety is necessary for balance. I wouldn't want to feed one protein source, it could make the dogs digestive system sensitive. Better to offer many different proteins so the dogs system can deal on a regular basis. Unless there is a severe allergy issue, the more the better, IMO.
 

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I understand one of the reasons people feed raw was the fact that your basically resorting back to what they were designed to be fed on. But if thats the case, I'm not understanding why the mixture of different meats.
Because they are different types of protein the body builds itself of. The hardest for dog's liver to metabolize is pork, it is not recommended to feed meat, but bare pork bones are easier to chew than beef bones. Raw meaty bones are crucial for your dog digestion system and for cleaning his teeth. Protein of deer meat is not very different from beef as these two animals are related, it is not easy to digest as well, raw beef/deer meat you can feed every day but in small portions; liver, which is rich in vitamines is good to feed only once in two weeks - otherwise it could turn to so called "protein poisoning". Raw lamb is easier but also costly. The main food for a wolf are small rodents like mice, rabbits or hare and birds. It is normally eaten whole, together with fur and with feathers, like bone chewed mass fur or feathers clean dog guts from accumulating mucus. Raw hare and pheasant are the best. You should also provide him with sea fish, better raw, every second week, fish oil and phosphorous substances are important for healthy joints.
 

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We feed chicken (leg quarters), venison when we can get it (all parts including ribs, organs and muscle meat), whole mackerel, lamb when it's on sale (but it is rich and can loosen stools so we feed occasionally to add diversity), rabbit (the whole thing), duck, goat, beef and turkey. I don't have access to exotics like buffalo, elk, bison etc but we find that our rotation is sufficient. Organ meat twice a week and we rotate that too between liver, lungs and kidneys. We do not feed pork as it seems to be terribly difficult on their systems. We just look at what is on sale and stock up. I give an egg and a squirt of salmon oil several days a week. My two are healthy and their coats are gorgeous. Like I have posted before, Ruger seems a little lean, but he is in that awkward stage, so I think he will be okay. This may not work for everyone, but it works well for us and the dogs are healthy and that's all that matters to me :)


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Discussion Starter #11
Because they are different types of protein the body builds itself of. The hardest for dog's liver to metabolize is pork, it is not recommended to feed meat, but bare pork bones are easier to chew than beef bones. Raw meaty bones are crucial for your dog digestion system and for cleaning his teeth. Protein of deer meat is not very different from beef as these two animals are related, it is not easy to digest as well, raw beef/deer meat you can feed every day but in small portions; liver, which is rich in vitamines is good to feed only once in two weeks - otherwise it could turn to so called "protein poisoning". Raw lamb is easier but also costly. The main food for a wolf are small rodents like mice, rabbits or hare and birds. It is normally eaten whole, together with fur and with feathers, like bone chewed mass fur or feathers clean dog guts from accumulating mucus. Raw hare and pheasant are the best. You should also provide him with sea fish, better raw, every second week, fish oil and phosphorous substances are important for healthy joints.

So a diet heavy in venison is not a good idea due to the digestablility. Also it appears that thier diets would be varied in the wild also. OK it's starting to make sense now. You basically mimic a wild diet but with varied animals. OK, it's sinking in, I'm alittle dense when it comes to this as I've always fed kibble.

Last question. I feed twice a day totaling 4 1/2 cups. Plus now one raw egg on top of morning meal. So what schedules do you guys and gals feed raw? Twice a day once a day?

This all seems labor intensive. I'm sure it is the best way to feed, I can see why. Their systems are tuned to this type of food. This type of feeding may not be a good fit for me as I would be the one to do it and my schedule is unpredictable right now.
 

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Because they are different types of protein the body builds itself of. The hardest for dog's liver to metabolize is pork, it is not recommended to feed meat, but bare pork bones are easier to chew than beef bones. Raw meaty bones are crucial for your dog digestion system and for cleaning his teeth. Protein of deer meat is not very different from beef as these two animals are related, it is not easy to digest as well, raw beef/deer meat you can feed every day but in small portions; liver, which is rich in vitamines is good to feed only once in two weeks - otherwise it could turn to so called "protein poisoning". Raw lamb is easier but also costly. The main food for a wolf are small rodents like mice, rabbits or hare and birds. It is normally eaten whole, together with fur and with feathers, like bone chewed mass fur or feathers clean dog guts from accumulating mucus. Raw hare and pheasant are the best. You should also provide him with sea fish, better raw, every second week, fish oil and phosphorous substances are important for healthy joints.
Could you please provide documentation on this? I've talked to nutritionists about raw diets and have never heard any of this, in fact, I've been told the opposite.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
We feed chicken (leg quarters), venison when we can get it (all parts including ribs, organs and muscle meat), whole mackerel, lamb when it's on sale (but it is rich and can loosen stools so we feed occasionally to add diversity), rabbit (the whole thing), duck, goat, beef and turkey. I don't have access to exotics like buffalo, elk, bison etc but we find that our rotation is sufficient. Organ meat twice a week and we rotate that too between liver, lungs and kidneys. We do not feed pork as it seems to be terribly difficult on their systems. We just look at what is on sale and stock up. I give an egg and a squirt of salmon oil several days a week. My two are healthy and their coats are gorgeous. Like I have posted before, Ruger seems a little lean, but he is in that awkward stage, so I think he will be okay. This may not work for everyone, but it works well for us and the dogs are healthy and that's all that matters to me :)


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I turkey hunt also but limit is two birds a season equalling 4 a year (spring season and fall)........if I'm lucky. :cool: Venison would be almost unlimited as the reason I'm inquiring so heavy about it. I'm in an area where I can shoot up to how ever many permits I want to buy. At least it used to be that way. Three to four would last a year for sure. If in limited amounts two deer would suffice. I can raise poultry. Rabbits? I don't think my family would ever forgive me for that one...:D I wonder if squirrel would suffice in place of rabbit. I also can hunt duck and goose. Pheasant would be cheaper to buy for me than hunting it. I used to hunt all the above and still hunt some of the above.

How can you tell what they can totally consume and what they can only have parts of?
 

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I wouldn't feed wild game poultry legs. Those bones will be tough like a commercial turkey due to age and use. Frames and necks from the game poultry will be fine. Any meat from any of it is good. In fact, it would be better than anything you can buy because these animals are grazing so the O3's are higher in the meat!

Squirrel, duck, goose (save and feed the trachea from these birds! Especially the long one of the goose), venison, rabbits, pheasant, quail....those are all good.

Don't throw anything away, other than the guts and the skins. Hearts, livers, kidneys (wash these out!), kidneys, stomachs from the deer (for fresh grass fed tripe...just cut them open and shake out the contents). Some people feed the heads but I can't get past the ick factor!
 

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Discussion Starter #15
I wouldn't feed wild game poultry legs. Those bones will be tough like a commercial turkey due to age and use. Frames and necks from the game poultry will be fine. Any meat from any of it is good. In fact, it would be better than anything you can buy because these animals are grazing so the O3's are higher in the meat!

Squirrel, duck, goose (save and feed the trachea from these birds! Especially the long one of the goose), venison, rabbits, pheasant, quail....those are all good.

Don't throw anything away, other than the guts and the skins. Hearts, livers, kidneys (wash these out!), kidneys, stomachs from the deer (for fresh grass fed tripe...just cut them open and shake out the contents). Some people feed the heads but I can't get past the ick factor!

There is one thing you just brought to mind and it deals with deer. As a hunter, I have access to alot of info about whats going on with heards and the like. One thing that has not been talked about here and anyone recieving whole deer to slaughter should be aware of. It's a disease deer can carry called Cronic Watse Disorder or CWD for short. It mainly effects the nervous system of the deer. Parts that should be avoided for consumption are the brain and spine or any organ thats part of the nervous system in the deer.

I wanted to point this out as hunters have always been told and warned to not consume these parts. There is no proof it would transfer to dogs or people, but to be on the safe side, it's better to just scrap those parts then take a chance.

It should also be pointed out that not all heards or areas contain this disease. But I would be sure to contact the local fish and game if I recieved a deer to find out if it was taken in an infected or quarentined area. I still would not feed these parts anyways.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
I wouldn't feed wild game poultry legs. Those bones will be tough like a commercial turkey due to age and use. Frames and necks from the game poultry will be fine. Any meat from any of it is good. In fact, it would be better than anything you can buy because these animals are grazing so the O3's are higher in the meat!

Squirrel, duck, goose (save and feed the trachea from these birds! Especially the long one of the goose), venison, rabbits, pheasant, quail....those are all good.

Don't throw anything away, other than the guts and the skins. Hearts, livers, kidneys (wash these out!), kidneys, stomachs from the deer (for fresh grass fed tripe...just cut them open and shake out the contents). Some people feed the heads but I can't get past the ick factor!

Great info. Much appritiated
 

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just to comment on "low fat" in the diet. I had BW done on my Jax a few years ago to check all her levels since she's on raw. The only level off was her pancreatic level...by about 3000. My vet was panicked, going over everything in her diet until we hit on TWO hotdogs used for training the night before. Dogs do NOT need high fat in their diet and they are not designed for it per my vet. It's why they see so many flair ups of pancreatitis over holidays...people feeding fatty scraps. If you want to add fat, feed some poultry skins once in a while. Even the game out with commercial, but don't get hung up on low fat.
 

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There are different schools of thought on raw feeding. Some feed prey model, which is basically taking the animal, fur, feathers, feet and all, and allowing the dog to feed. Some do this not just with small prey but with partial lamb and goat carcass (probably other game also). We do not feed that way, although I am not sure I disagree with it. We just don't do it like that. When we started raw feeding I did a TON of research, read every book I could get my hands on and then used common sense.
1. Diversity?? How healthy would we be eating the same thing for every meal, every single day? That made total sense to me.

2. I research fat content in the different protein sources to determine how often to feed each one. It's impossible to make it absolutely perfect but then again, is kibble perfect?? I can't tell you off the top of my head what we tried but certain things stick in my memory: Liver is very rich and so I learned from poop patrol that I could not feed an entire meal of it. So, we give a little bit a couple of times per week and it works great. However, your crew may react differently. Also, lamb loosened stool, so I made sure to feed it bone in to help with the poo. Works fine. It's trial and error.

3. Don't over think it. This one was hard for me. You will do fine if you use 4 protein sources per week and throw in some organ meat a couple times per week. Watch their body shape and their poo. If they both look good, don't fret. *It will be normal to have looser stools while they adjust to the raw and be sure start out with one source and feed that initially as the only source to let their digestive system get used to the change. Then gradually add small amounts of another source. Do that for a while until you see good poo without issues and then add another....There may be other opinions on this but this is what we did and it worked great for us. Helped to be sure there weren't any allergies to a particular protein source as well. It took us about 4 months to work up to the regular rotation. So, basically a month for each protein source. Some might think that isn't necessary but it worked fine for us.

There are many respected members of this forum who feed raw and give great advice. Try not to stress. Once you have it down, it won't take any time at all. Sure it isn't as fast as throwing kibble in a bowl, but it isn't super labor intensive either. You'll get the hang of it in no time :)

We feed twice a day, some feed once. For my crew, feeding once caused loose stools to be more common than I was comfortable with. Feeding twice works well for them. Again, it depends on your specific dogs. Other than what I experienced and that being my reason for feeding twice a day, I do not know if there is a health or medical reason to feed one way or the other. I am sure others will chime in here :)

Good luck :)


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I turkey hunt also but limit is two birds a season equalling 4 a year (spring season and fall)........if I'm lucky. :cool: Venison would be almost unlimited as the reason I'm inquiring so heavy about it. I'm in an area where I can shoot up to how ever many permits I want to buy. At least it used to be that way. Three to four would last a year for sure. If in limited amounts two deer would suffice. I can raise poultry. Rabbits? I don't think my family would ever forgive me for that one...:D I wonder if squirrel would suffice in place of rabbit. I also can hunt duck and goose. Pheasant would be cheaper to buy for me than hunting it. I used to hunt all the above and still hunt some of the above.

How can you tell what they can totally consume and what they can only have parts of?
I basically feed what I have access to from meat markets. We live in Florida and do not hunt, although I wish we could. I basically researched how to feed raw with what I could get my hands on. There are some hunters on here who can probably talk more about do's and dont's when dealing with an entire carcass. FWIW, I don't recall anyone telling me to specifically avoid certain body parts. It never was an issue or me to focus on because I have limited resources. I'm sure others will comment to help you out here :)


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deer spine....I would not feed those. Look up that wasting disease they have. It's in their spinal cord. I believe it still in the midwest and west but not sure.
 
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