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http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/02/090217141540.htm

If You're Aggressive, Your Dog Will Be Too, Says Veterinary Study
ScienceDaily (Feb. 18, 2009) — In a new, year-long University of Pennsylvania survey of dog owners who use confrontational or aversive methods to train aggressive pets, veterinary researchers have found that most of these animals will continue to be aggressive unless training techniques are modified.

The study, published in the current issue of Applied Animal Behavior Science, also showed that using non-aversive or neutral training methods such as additional exercise or rewards elicited very few aggressive responses.

“Nationwide, the No. 1 reason why dog owners take their pet to a veterinary behaviorist is to manage aggressive behavior,” Meghan E. Herron, lead author of the study, said. “Our study demonstrated that many confrontational training methods, whether staring down dogs, striking them or intimidating them with physical manipulation does little to correct improper behavior and can elicit aggressive responses.”

more at http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/02/090217141540.htm
 

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Quote:Several confrontational methods such as “hit or kick dog for undesirable behavior” (43 percent), “growl at dog” (41 percent), “physically force the release of an item from a dog's mouth” (39 percent), “alpha roll”physically -- rolling the dog onto its back and holding it (31 percent), “stare at or stare down” (30 percent), “dominance down” —- physically forcing the dog down onto its side (29 percent) and “grab dog by jowls and shake” (26 percent) elicited an aggressive response from at least 25 percent of the dogs on which they were attempted.
Gee an aggressive dog reacted badly to this, what a shock. Not a way to treat pretty much any animal.
 

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Interesting article, thanks for posting it.

I'm about to pick up a Malinois this Saturday who has been abused by a previous owner. Poor thing will stiffen and show teeth if you put a training collar (choke chain) on him or reach down to adjust the collar. With an e-collar, he went to pieces without the collar even being on (in his current home).

I'm going to be picking up the pieces and see if I can get him to a point where training will be FUN, not frightening for him. I don't know what the last owner thought they were doing, but it was not training.
 

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Oh Chris you are an angel for taking this poor guy on and trying to help him.

It is not rocket science, punitive based training is not effective for aggression, it is really not effective for much of anything.

I'll go read the articles now- thnaks for posting them!
 

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I just sent the link to our club's newsletter editor for her use too. We have a few of those kinds of trainers in our 'wonderful' little club.
 

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Originally Posted By: HistorianInteresting article, thanks for posting it.

I'm about to pick up a Malinois this Saturday who has been abused by a previous owner. Poor thing will stiffen and show teeth if you put a training collar (choke chain) on him or reach down to adjust the collar. With an e-collar, he went to pieces without the collar even being on (in his current home).

I'm going to be picking up the pieces and see if I can get him to a point where training will be FUN, not frightening for him. I don't know what the last owner thought they were doing, but it was not training.
Chris,

This is what Basu was like. He was 4.5 when we got him and he would fall on the floor and show you his belly at the sight of a leash or the sound of any of the normal commands.


He did come around though with lots and lots of positive reinforcement and play time.

Good luck!
 
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