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The FDA issued the following pet food consumer alert today (July 12, 2018):

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration is alerting pet owners and veterinary professionals about reports of canine dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) in dogs eating certain pet foods containing peas, lentils, other legume seeds, or potatoes as main ingredients. These reports are unusual because DCM is occurring in breeds not typically genetically prone to the disease. The FDA’s Center for Veterinary Medicine and the Veterinary Laboratory Investigation and Response Network, a collaboration of government and veterinary diagnostic laboratories, are investigating this potential association.





http://truthaboutpetfood.com/fda-investigates-potential-connection-to-diet-and-heart-disease-in-dogs/
 

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There is a strong correlation between the grain free diets and a higher incidence of taurine deficiency causing DCM. Lots of info coming out of Tufts.

The grains were replaced by items with higher protein content so less meat in the food. Less meat = less taurine in the diet. Less taurine = sick or dead animals. :(

Grain-free. Is. A. Marketing. Ploy.
 

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@Momto2GSDs, I saw that article. It still sounds like there's nothing conclusive??

"Diets in cases reported to the FDA frequently list potatoes or multiple legumes such as peas, lentils, other “pulses” (seeds of legumes), and their protein, starch and fiber derivatives early in the ingredient list, indicating that they are main ingredients. Early reports from the veterinary cardiology community indicate that the dogs consistently ate these foods as their primary source of nutrition for time periods ranging from months to years. High levels of legumes or potatoes appear to be more common in diets labeled as “grain-free,” but it is not yet known how these ingredients are linked to cases of DCM. Changes in diet, especially for dogs with DCM, should be made in consultation with a licensed veterinarian."
 

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So what dogs need grains? What do you do if you're feeding raw? Or your dog is allergic to all grains?


If you’re feeding raw, your dog is getting taurine. Replacing that meat with peas, etc reduces the taurine.
 

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Great now I don't know what to feed Xena. I just brought a new bag of Diamond Naturals Lamb-GF adult Large Breed. But I have noticed that lately her poop is not as sold anymore.

I don't know what to feed her.
 

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While I do not totally disagree with you, didn't the "Pea/Legume" revolution begin for dogs who were sensitive to grains?
I'm not sure why I would know that??

The grain free fad took off after the wheat was contaminated and many, many dogs died.
 

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A broken heart: Risk of heart disease in boutique or grain-free diets and exotic ingredients ? Clinical Nutrition Service at Cummings School
Interesting article
I don’t think I will feed my dogs corn. I did go to Fromm grain dog food which has lots of grain so not feeling much better. I do supplement with fresh meat and there is tAurine in the food. I did notice max’s nose is less dry from switching to grain free to food with grain.
Great now I don't know what to feed Xena. I just brought a new bag of Diamond Naturals Lamb-GF adult Large Breed. But I have noticed that lately her poop is not as sold anymore.

I don't know what to feed her.

Just supplement with taurine. NOW has powdered taurine you can just put on their food. It's inexpensive. Keep it refrigerated.

Feeding a raw diet is no guarantee to have enough taurine either. It depends on what meat is in the diet.
 

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Processing with heat with water apparently dramatically reduces the natural taurine in meat and eggs, so that may also have something to do with the kibble problem (as the natural taurine sources are degraded by processing: first boiled in the rendering pot, and then steamed in the extrusion machine).
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12864905
 

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Yes, taurine is sensitive to both heat and exposure to air. It's why I don't grind the hearts for the cat food. They've been adding taurine to cat food for years so any dog food with ADDED taurine should not have issues.
 
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