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Heidi is a year and a half. I walk her, run her, and started agility with her. SHE DOES NOT GET TIRED. Help. No matter how long I walk her, how fast I run her, more obstacles I put her through she pants a little drinks some water and then is back to being hyper. Any ideas on what to do? Or why she is like this? I love this dog. I want to do everything I can for her to have her be healthy and happy. Could her lines have anything to do with her energy level? I mean obviously working vs show lines have an effect but what about German lines energy level vs other lines energy level? Is that even a thing lol.
Sorry this is longer than I meant it to be.
 

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Unless you are in extremely good physical condition "Olympic", you may never out run or walk your dog IMO. I utilize multiple dogs in exercise sessions to allow the dog vs. dog challenge and eventually they are all tired! Is this an option? Does she have ball drive? Tennis ball machine is another option! Cycling is also another option... Many many more options I'm sure.
 

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When Carly was about your dog's age, my breeder asked me "does this dog ever get tired, does she ever stop!??". Well, only if I tell her to, LOL.

It did help that we had more than one dog. The wrestling and chasing helped to tire her out some. She was never what I'd call hyper or frantic, just always wanted to be doing something. Shes not a lazy girl! Hopefully your dog will get to a place where you tell her "enough" and she'll settle somewhere. Carly does, but she's always ready to go...
 

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Unless you are in extremely good physical condition "Olympic", you may never out run or walk your dog IMO. I utilize multiple dogs in exercise sessions to allow the dog vs. dog challenge and eventually they are all tired! Is this an option? Does she have ball drive? Tennis ball machine is another option! Cycling is also another option... Many many more options I'm sure.

Applause applause applause!

This is exactly what I do with mine.
 

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Physically tiring a GSD out isn't going to be a good long term plan. You might get in a few good days like that in but if you do it consistently enough...

You dog will just build more endurance lol

Well bred GSDs are high energy dogs. Regardless of their lines. They were meant to herd sheep all day. Not just move the sheep but to be constantly circling the flock. I think the difference is that some have more laid back personalities and less drive. A well bred show line dog doesn't have less energy per se then a working line dog, it's just that the show line dog doesn't have as much of that deep seeded need to USE that energy towards something productive.

Yes they need exercise. A lot compared to other dogs. My guy does best with 2ish hours a day of off leash running and fetch. He's working line and pet line mixed.

Here's the thing, given the opportunity off leash he will run and move and be all crazy. For about 15 mins. That's letting off excess energy and excitement. After the 15 mins he is right by my side ready to get to -work- His job is to fetch the ball. He will happily do it All. Day. Long. 2 ish hours is our sweet spot where his need to work has been nearly met and we've skimmed off enough from his energy reserves that it won't be difficult for him to practice self control. The trick is finding the balance for each dog as an individual.

Mental exercise is just as important as physical. I employ a lot of puzzle toys and training games to make up for the rest of my guy's need to work.

Out right hyperness though - i see that as a training issue. Some dogs need to have an off button trained into them and need a lot more practice and training with impulse control than others.
 

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Physically tiring a GSD out isn't going to be a good long term plan. You might get in a few good days like that in but if you do it consistently enough...

You dog will just build more endurance lol

Well bred GSDs are high energy dogs. Regardless of their lines. They were meant to herd sheep all day. Not just move the sheep but to be constantly circling the flock. I think the difference is that some have more laid back personalities and less drive. A well bred show line dog doesn't have less energy per se then a working line dog, it's just that the show line dog doesn't have as much of that deep seeded need to USE that energy towards something productive.

Yes they need exercise. A lot compared to other dogs. My guy does best with 2ish hours a day of off leash running and fetch. He's working line and pet line mixed.

Here's the thing, given the opportunity off leash he will run and move and be all crazy. For about 15 mins. That's letting off excess energy and excitement. After the 15 mins he is right by my side ready to get to -work- His job is to fetch the ball. He will happily do it All. Day. Long. 2 ish hours is our sweet spot where his need to work has been nearly met and we've skimmed off enough from his energy reserves that it won't be difficult for him to practice self control. The trick is finding the balance for each dog as an individual.

Mental exercise is just as important as physical. I employ a lot of puzzle toys and training games to make up for the rest of my guy's need to work.

Out right hyperness though - i see that as a training issue. Some dogs need to have an off button trained into them and need a lot more practice and training with impulse control than others.
I on the other hand I feel it is a great long term plan.
For muscle breakdown and growth to occur you must force your dogs muscles to adapt by creating stress that is different than the previous threshold it's body has already adapted to. This is can be done by increasing the exercise of choice, continually changing the exercises so that you can damage more total muscle fibers and pushing your dogs muscles to fatigue while getting a “pump.” After the workout is completed, the most important part begins which is adequate rest and providing ample fuel to your dogs muscles so they can regenerate and grow.

But what do I know!:grin2:
 

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I think a lot of where you exercise your dog counts as well. Hiking in the woods allows them to use their minds and to express their natural drives.
My dogs are always wiped out after a day in the woods. Even a simple nosework class can be tiring.
 

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My dogs are always wiped out after a day in the woods. Even a simple nosework class can be tiring.
True, but in the woods you exercise more parts of their minds and their bodies simultaneously. I find it a better way to encompass more aspects than to isolate one.

Nothing against taking a class, or pursuing a venue, just saying for JQP, it is probably one of the best outlets for a well behaved dog.
 

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My dogs are always wiped out after a day in the woods. Even a simple nosework class can be tiring.
IN some areas mental stimulation is a bigger factor than physical stimulation, I personally have found for most women this is even more important. :surprise:
 

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True, but in the woods you exercise more parts of their minds and their bodies simultaneously. I find it a better way to encompass more aspects than to isolate one.

Nothing against taking a class, or pursuing a venue, just saying for JQP, it is probably one of the best outlets for a well behaved dog.
Since I live in the middle of the prairie, taking the dogs to run in the woods isn't a very common occurrence, unfortunately. So getting out to take a class is a good thing. I'm very envious of those of you that have woods, springs and beaches at your fingertips!
 

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Since I live in the middle of the prairie, taking the dogs to run in the woods isn't a very common occurrence, unfortunately. So getting out to take a class is a good thing. I'm very envious of those of you that have woods, springs and beaches at your fingertips!
I used to envy the many on here on farms. Within the last couple of days somebody was proud of their dog for being on a boat and going under a railroad trestle with a train crossing. It made me realize how much I actually have near me. Ten minute walk to the river. Four rivers to choose from, lakes. An over heard active railroad trestle a block away, an active railroad underpass another block away, strip malls, large parks, lots of dog parks, etc. I am very grateful to have all of this so close to me.

Now dog training classes, doesn't matter what venue except for Petco, be prepared to travel.
 

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I on the other hand I feel it is a great long term plan.
For muscle breakdown and growth to occur you must force your dogs muscles to adapt by creating stress that is different than the previous threshold it's body has already adapted to. This is can be done by increasing the exercise of choice, continually changing the exercises so that you can damage more total muscle fibers and pushing your dogs muscles to fatigue while getting a “pump.” After the workout is completed, the most important part begins which is adequate rest and providing ample fuel to your dogs muscles so they can regenerate and grow.

But what do I know!:grin2:
I guess it depends on your definition of "tiring them out". Are you talking about getting the dog to the point where it is content to be quiet or to the point it has to be quiet?

The first is a training and management issue.

The second is unrealistic for most people to achieve on a daily basis. There is always going to be a genetically predetermined peak fitness. For well bred german shepherds that is going to be a fairly high threshold. By the nature of the job they were bred for, as tending dogs gsds are going to have more type I muscle fibers. Difficult to reach their peak fitness potential for anyone who isn't using their gsd as an honest to God working animal.

That's why I made the distinction between desire to work and energy level. I would venture to say the vast majority of people who think they've tired their dog out - have not done so physically. They offered enough activity to siphon off some of the energy reserves and provided enough mental stimulation to satisfy their dogs need to work. Leaving their dog content to rest but not actually, physically tired out.

Then of course there are the heath implications along with attempting to physically tire them out on a consistent basis that leads to break downs and injuries. I've often found with conditioning less is more.
 

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I guess it depends on your definition of "tiring them out". Are you talking about getting the dog to the point where it is content to be quiet or to the point it has to be quiet?

The first is a training and management issue.

The second is unrealistic for most people to achieve on a daily basis. There is always going to be a genetically predetermined peak fitness. For well bred german shepherds that is going to be a fairly high threshold. By the nature of the job they were bred for, as tending dogs gsds are going to have more type I muscle fibers. Difficult to reach their peak fitness potential for anyone who isn't using their gsd as an honest to God working animal.

That's why I made the distinction between desire to work and energy level. I would venture to say the vast majority of people who think they've tired their dog out - have not done so physically. They offered enough activity to siphon off some of the energy reserves and provided enough mental stimulation to satisfy their dogs need to work. Leaving their dog content to rest but not actually, physically tired out.

Then of course there are the heath implications along with attempting to physically tire them out on a consistent basis that leads to break downs and injuries. I've often found with conditioning less is more.
I have answered the OP question in my opinion. I don't want to debate, as I said what do I know!

WoW @ I've often found with conditioning less is more @ WoW

Where's that button again?
 

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I have answered the OP question in my opinion. I don't want to debate, as I said what do I know!

WoW @ I've often found with conditioning less is more @ WoW

Where's that button again?
No need to get all defensive.

Yes. My personal experience with conditioning is less is more - once you have reached your desired level. I used to show horses. 20 minutes on a hot walker maintained condition while preserving health and preventing break downs.

Doing an hour wouldn't have gotten the animal into better shape, just fatigue it and make it more likely to be injured.
 

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I know I can never physically tire my dog out would injure myself trying. Long runs on the beach and swimming walking through trails training, classes, and bike rides through paths are what keep him content. I do enjoy it when he does seem a bit tired- a quick nap to reboot.Games of fetch with training tied in are other ways we have fun and get the endorphins flowing. If I had another dog that they can play together- other then our chi it would be another way to have some fun. Any consistent repetitive movements can be wear and tear on joints so footing is important. My horses mind would go numb on a hot walker hopefully not his joints.
 
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