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Discussion Starter #1
How would one go about having a dog evaluated as a SAR or detection prospect?
How would one go about placing said dog with a SAR handler or as a detection dog?
I am not involved in either of those, so don't really have personal contacts to reach out to.
 

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Did you want to get involved with these lines of work or do you think you have a dog that would do well so want it evaluated?
 

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Best bet is to find a local SAR team and contact them. A google search would probably wield some results in your area.
 

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In the case of the SAR dog teams here, they have their own evaluator. It costs a nominal fee, about $65 for us. It may vary, but I would first make contact with the dog teams in your area -- there could be more than one, could have specialized teams, etc-- and see first if you like the team, they will be able to guide you.

Others will probably chime in with more information.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Did you want to get involved with these lines of work or do you think you have a dog that would do well so want it evaluated?
For a dog I have that I feel would do really well, based on what I do know & see.
I just would prefer to have a more knowledgeable person evaluate her & get their thoughts also, before trying to place her as a SAR or detection prospect.

There isn't a SAR team close to me, so looking for other options.
 

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I don't know about detection work per se, but SAR work requires so many different factors from scenting capability to working the scent cone to ranging from the handler to agility to some obedience, to prey drive, hunt drive.... If you are really serious you would have to drive and find evaluators in the fields you are interested in. IMHO
 

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TXTF1 created a fairly decent prospect screening test. Should be able to find it on Disasterdog.org. Could at least give you an idea if what you think is what you have.
 

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I know that there are training books out there too that talk about dog selection. You could check some of those out.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Thanks, I've read up on how to evaluate for SAR, scent detection, etc.
I do know how to correctly read & evaluate a drives in a dog.

Just was hoping to find a human to connect with, LOL
 

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We use the test on disasterdog.org for dogs we are considering for our own team. It is a good test for air scent / cadaver dogs. Some of the trailing dogs, not so much.

Push the temperament testing as well. If the dog can't be around other dogs and all kinds of crazy stuff and experience new things without hesitation then go no further.
 

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As any other training session it will cost you money. SAR teams have trainers, one or the other is an expert in evaluating dogs for this work. It would be not just one or two sessions, your dog would be tested under different conditions (time of the day, presence of different distractions) as well as his olfactory capabilities and his temperament in general. So, do not look at it as a single momentum. Normally, those who were involved in SAR work try to buy a SAR puppy, so to have necessary qualities before hand. With that it could be not a bad idea to look what his parents were doing, then you may expect your chances.
 

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first hurdle -- get your dog's hips and elbows x ray evaluated.

does your dog search with intensity over a long period of time , without guidance or you trying to motivate ?
 

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first hurdle -- get your dog's hips and elbows x ray evaluated.

does your dog search with intensity over a long period of time , without guidance or you trying to motivate ?
There are dogs with bad hips in SAR work, they simply stop working when 5-6 years old, still capable of bringing good to the society . Long search and work without guidance come after building foundation, commitment and acquiring a solid indication alert,, being able to detect the whole range of odours, and that is after 1 year, year and half of training. You probably mean "the ability to work independently from the handler". Yes, you may break your leg on the way, fall into some pit, even be dead - but your dog should continue the search and bring other team members to the find. But, again, that is a trained behaviour. With SAR testing dogs fail when, say, they are tested for loud sounds, or night time distractions. Naturally dogs don't have a good sense of vision, may become scared, and that's why problematic. In temperament "flegma" and "choleric" could be better than some energetic "optimist".
 

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if a dog needs to be replaced at age 5 or 6 because of physical problems , that may mean a total of 2 or 3 years of actual working time . As much time training and being an in-sync team goes into the dog as the dog is able to give at work.

A good dog should provide 7 to 8 years of work.

Tenacity is inborn. A dog can't kack out after 20 minutes looking . Some dogs look initially impressive , superficial search , and then the steam is out of them. That can't be taught. Initiative and self motivation are not taught .
 

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Discussion Starter #15
I looked over this checklist, this is the one you are talking about, correct?
http://disasterdog.org/pdf/training/articles/Screening.pdf

I'll try to get an impartial person & set up those tests this week.

David,

She comes from bloodlines that have produced active SAR dogs pretty consistently.
She has never ending hunt drive & will go over, under, or through anything to find her ball.
She's good with other dogs/animals & around strangers.

I would be willing to pay for the evaluation, not looking for handouts :)
 

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There are dogs with bad hips in SAR work, they simply stop working when 5-6 years old, still capable of bringing good to the society . Long search and work without guidance come after building foundation, commitment and acquiring a solid indication alert,, being able to detect the whole range of odours, and that is after 1 year, year and half of training. You probably mean "the ability to work independently from the handler". Yes, you may break your leg on the way, fall into some pit, even be dead - but your dog should continue the search and bring other team members to the find. But, again, that is a trained behaviour. With SAR testing dogs fail when, say, they are tested for loud sounds, or night time distractions. Naturally dogs don't have a good sense of vision, may become scared, and that's why problematic. In temperament "flegma" and "choleric" could be better than some energetic "optimist".
Well, I would expect the bond between the handler and the dog to be good enough that if the handler got hurt the dog would be there for them and vice versa and not keep searching. You want enough confidence and independance for the dog to range away from the handler but there is a lot to that bond that I can't articulate.

Anyway. While you can build "nose time" in training and should!, You can't make a dog what it is not.
 

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David, I assume you are talking about the searchers not dying? Missing people sometimes die. Experienced searchers don't tend to get lost, but injury can still happen. The most dangerous part of search and rescue is the drive home after a search.......the adrenaline is going when you are going TO the search but coming back is a different story.
 
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