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I thought it was just a fairy tale that trainers told their trainees as to why their dogs are acting out. I was greatly mistaken. Recently Parker (14 months) has been hitting his second fear stage. I was confused as to why all of a sudden he acted out to people and dogs. After a month of training and lots of books to read i think he's actually going to the right path.

With a lot of reading on books such as BAT and Control Unleashed and researching about his second fear stage, i have come a very long way in letting him know that i am his leader and with my body language and direction showing him that some aspects that he finds scary are actually not bad. im there to protect him. establishing a SOLID foundation of obedience and training without distractions in my yard i have brought him from being reactive to people, to actually being petted by them (once he sits by me and the person asks if he/she can pet him; i look at him and say his cue "Pet" and he's happy for the person to pet him)

Just thought i would share this story for others who are having trouble with their companions. There is hope, but again...patience, 10-15 minutes of training everyday and controlling the environment can take your companion to newer heights.
 

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Very inspiring and helpful ideas on how to help one's dog. thanks!
 

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i don't believe in stages that occur with a dog. i think
stages are a lack of training, training incorrectly, lack
of consistency in training and socializing and blaming the dog.
i think the owner of the dog goes through stages.

is training 15 to 20 minutes a day enough?


I thought it was just a fairy tale that trainers told their trainees as to why their dogs are acting out. I was greatly mistaken. Recently Parker (14 months) has been hitting his second fear stage. I was confused as to why all of a sudden he acted out to people and dogs. After a month of training and lots of books to read i think he's actually going to the right path.

With a lot of reading on books such as BAT and Control Unleashed and researching about his second fear stage, i have come a very long way in letting him know that i am his leader and with my body language and direction showing him that some aspects that he finds scary are actually not bad. im there to protect him. establishing a SOLID foundation of obedience and training without distractions in my yard i have brought him from being reactive to people, to actually being petted by them (once he sits by me and the person asks if he/she can pet him; i look at him and say his cue "Pet" and he's happy for the person to pet him)

Just thought i would share this story for others who are having trouble with their companions. There is hope, but again...patience, 10-15 minutes of training everyday and controlling the environment can take your companion to newer heights.
 

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Dogs genetically are strong or not, socializing and training play into it, but the dog is what it is. I agree with you ParkersPopLou, the dog needs to know you have his back and that you are the one controlling his environment. Some dogs don't need that feeling, because they are confident enough to know what's what, other dogs need to be managed so they don't feel the need to 'control' situations.

I have dogs from each spectrum~handling, training, socializing according to the dogs thresholds are key in managing. I don't allow people to pet my dog if my dog isn't into it.
I'll read the people and the dog, and if the dog makes the first move, then it goes much better than if I command my dog to comply. Vetting is touchy, muzzle is a given for one of my dogs. Always a work in progress with dogs that have less than stellar nerves.
 

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Great job on finding something that works :). I've found LAT and BAT very helpful in helping Delgado learn that not all dogs are there for him to play with
 
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