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I wasn't sure if I should post this her or on the Health Board :blush:
You all mention that with me being in an apartment, if I choose a German Shepherd Dog, I would need to give it long walks. I'm thinking a hour in the morning, an hour mid day from a dog walker and then a good romp at the dog park and a 30 minute one before being in for the night. Would that be sufficient to keep energy and a good balanced level? Or should I do more or less. I'm just looking for what you would think an everyday average GSD would need. A general idea is all. And thanks in advance!
 

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It all depends on the dog. What you suggest would be too much exercise for my GSD mix, but not quite enough for my GSD. I think it's a very good place to start though. It sounds like enough exercise for most dogs, but possibly not enough for a working line dog (although I have never owned a WLGSD). You could probably skip the 30 minute walk and do some obedience and get the same effect.
 

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Like Good Karma said! I think you will just have to "read" your dog, if he or she is crazy in the house after exercise you may want to add some and if he or she is just totally wiped out you may want to back off a bit. You are doing everything right so far and I think you will be a great mom!
 

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That would be enough exercise for a low energy dog.

I just can't recommend getting a puppy for an apartment dweller as you don't have access to a fenced yard and they need off-leash time to just romp and time to hang outside without you to contemplate life. I've seen this over and over when people quickly get overwhelmed with their crazed puppy.

Having a puppy in an apartment can be done so long as you get a very low energy puppy and have access to a fenced area and are willing to get out and really exercise him. Getting an adult, lower energy dog would be a better idea.
 

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Agreed that it all depends on the dog. We raised 4 puppies in apartments or townhouses with no yards. We were lucky that both of the places we lived at had either fenced in dog parks for the residents or large undeveloped fields down the street.

My current puppy (11 months) is a nightmare even with a fenced yard. He has ALOT of go, and never seems tired- I am always trying to think of ways to wear him out. I think age and maturity might help him settle. He is related to 3 of my others. The 3 year old female and the 19 month old male need a good 30 minute session of flat out running (which I usually let them do by chasing each other...otherwise I'd need to be out longer throwing the ball) but other than that seem pretty comfortable with the regular training. My 8 year is also about like that. He also has a lot of Go for an older dog.

My almost 4 year old is a lovely moderate energy level dog. He's ready to go when I ask but will hang around politely until I do. He would be perfectly content on your plan. And actually so would just about everyone in my house with the exception of the puppy. And the exception of the dog park- some dogs are just not good dog park dogs...especially once they hit maturity. I can still take my 2 youngest to an offleash park, but we usually go to the not busy section at the not busy time. My older three are dominant and do not tolerate any rudeness from dogs that are not pack members. And in my experience dog parks are rife with rude dogs whose owners use them and the other dogs as a way to exercise their crazy from being inside all day dogs.

Our schedule during the week goes something like 15-20 minutes in the am before work to potty and do a few minutes of training and playing. Home from work big play in the yard- 30-40minimum minutes per dog. No one goes in until they choose to lay down in the yard, tongues are flared and ears are red- then I know they're tired and done. Hang out in house until dinner, feed, then rest everyone. 20-30 minutes outside in the evening to potty again and play/train. Then to bed.

Small puppies get many more 5-10 minutes breaks outside.

Weekends are for training and the dogs. We're probably at SchH training (yes, usually with all of them) for 5-6 hours one day. The other day is usually targeted at socialization or some other activity. Take 2 to PetsMart, Take another 2 to the park, someone else goes to Lowes, etc.
 

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I wasn't sure if I should post this her or on the Health Board :blush:
You all mention that with me being in an apartment, if I choose a German Shepherd Dog, I would need to give it long walks. I'm thinking a hour in the morning, an hour mid day from a dog walker and then a good romp at the dog park and a 30 minute one before being in for the night. Would that be sufficient to keep energy and a good balanced level? Or should I do more or less. I'm just looking for what you would think an everyday average GSD would need. A general idea is all. And thanks in advance!
Every dog is different and they can be different from one week to the next! Generally what you have listed is a great start.

But you can only really tell by how your dog behaves around the house with that regime...
 

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On leash dog walks aren't really physical exercise. Substitute walks for running,dog play/socialization and training and replace your play allotment with leash walks.
 

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also agree it depends on the dog,,that, however, would not work for my gsd nor my aussies,,mine need more physical exercise :)
 

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Discussion Starter #9
I didn't mention that I plan on getting a doggie Backpack. I know for a dogs whose never had a backpack, I have to start with an empty pack and slowly work my way up with small weight increments to a couple full bottles of water. And I also plan on using a near by facility who offers Obedience, Agility and Flyball. And all classes have beginner to intermediate classes. Also if I get a GSD, I now know that not all GSD work in the dog park. I plan on keeping on lead until I am absolutely sure I can let my dog run with out one. I also wont go completely lead free if I don't have the Call Back down pact. I will expect my dog to come running when called.
 

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My London is another super high energy GSD. And Olina is not far behind. They GO GO GO all day.
I don't want to discourage you but perhaps you should consider adopting a middle aged GSD from a shelter or rescue? Then you could really have a chance to evaluate the dog's energy level. Just a suggestion.....
 

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I don't think you can use the backpack with any weight in it until your dog is at least a year to 18 months old. Don't want to stress the joints while he's still growing.
 

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OP, it's really going to depend on the dog. I can't say for sure what the average is. I have a low-medium energy GSD who gets a small walk a day, a few runs a week with his backpack, play in the yard (on leash, unfenced) and training. He's not lacking exercise at all, but that wouldn't be enough for a LOT of other dogs, so it will just depend. That is definitely a good starting point I would say though.

That would be enough exercise for a low energy dog.

I just can't recommend getting a puppy for an apartment dweller as you don't have access to a fenced yard and they need off-leash time to just romp and time to hang outside without you to contemplate life. I've seen this over and over when people quickly get overwhelmed with their crazed puppy.

Having a puppy in an apartment can be done so long as you get a very low energy puppy and have access to a fenced area and are willing to get out and really exercise him. Getting an adult, lower energy dog would be a better idea.
That would be way too much exercise for a low energy dog. Frag is low-medium energy and he doesn't get that much exercise a day and is fine.

I don't know how you can say that you shouldn't get a GSD if you don't have a fenced in yard, live in an apartment (why does THAT matter?), and can't let the dog off leash.

We've never had a fenced in yard with Frag and we've only had him off leash exercising a handful of times other than the dog park he started going to at about 8 months. You can use long leads for play, training, running on soft surfaces, and play dates with other dogs. I live in a condo and don't have any issues with Frag. I just don't see your logic. Dogs do not NEED off leash time to contemplate anything. There are plenty of dogs that do not stick around or are on leashes all of the time (like Frag) and are JUST fine.

:confused:
 

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I don't start any of my puppies on lead....they are always off leash with me in the field. I find when their young- 8 weeks they don't run off which is a good way to teach come outdoors with treats when they are still wired to want to come to you,lol I've neevr had a dog run off on me in 30 years using this method and once they get used to being off lead and listening it makes the butt head stages that much easier. If your not near a main road I would bring the leash but consider allowing your pup off leash in a safe area.

As far as exercise both of my dogs have a ton of energy though they can turn it off inside for the most part. They get 20 minutes in the morning before I go to work, another 20-30 in the afternoon when I get home, and an 1 hour in the evenings- all of this is off leash though with them constantly running. If I do walk my dogs on the leash through the neighborhood it would take all day to get them tired so keep that in mind. Obedience classes are a great way to wear them out and socialize them, open fields, and finding friends with nice dogs to romp with.

I'm lucky we have a dog friendly neighborhood so my dogs play with a familiar pack daily and do a great job of tiring each other out. If you can squeeze in off leash time I think you'll be just fine:)
 

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I don't start any of my puppies on lead....they are always off leash with me in the field. I find when their young- 8 weeks they don't run off which is a good way to teach come outdoors with treats when they are still wired to want to come to you,lol I've neevr had a dog run off on me in 30 years using this method and once they get used to being off lead and listening it makes the butt head stages that much easier. If your not near a main road I would bring the leash but consider allowing your pup off leash in a safe area.
We do this too :) It really does work.
 

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My girl is super low energy, (gsd) but then we have my brothers rotti/lab mix and it seems like she can never get tired, no matter what she does, or what we do! It really depends on the dog- skylar cuddled right into me when i picked her out, and has been really laid back like that her whole life (7 months lol) and there was another that pulled away from me and she is crazy active, and the owners have trouble meeting her exercise needs lol!
It's really hard to say what the "average" GSD needs for exercise, IMO.

also, i've seen you post around here a lot and think it is so awesome that you're doing so much research before getting a dog!! I wish everyone did that :)
 

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Glad to see I'm not crazy,lol Leashes are for neighborhoods and areas with busy roads IMO. Puppies are scared to wonder too far off young so teaching recall this way I think solidifies it and definitely wears them out. My dogs still won't run off and come when called and are rarely ever leashed. I bring the leash in case we run into a not so nice dog or "concerned" citizens who just have to mention dogs should be leashed, but other than that letting them run, sniff, and play is the best way to truly tire them out:)
 

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I agree with the off leash training as a puppy. We did that with Zeb (started mostly at the beach) and he comes 99% of the time right away. I was just putting xmas lights up yesterday and he was with us in the front yard off leash with my mother in law's dog, never strayed more than 15 feet or so.

Mine is extremely high energy some days and other days he's a lazy puppy :p It depends. Normally I take him on a 3 mile walk in the evening when I get home from work and my husband takes him for about a 1 mile jog in the morning.
 

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OP, it's really going to depend on the dog. I can't say for sure what the average is. I have a low-medium energy GSD who gets a small walk a day, a few runs a week with his backpack, play in the yard (on leash, unfenced) and training. He's not lacking exercise at all, but that wouldn't be enough for a LOT of other dogs, so it will just depend. That is definitely a good starting point I would say though.



That would be way too much exercise for a low energy dog. Frag is low-medium energy and he doesn't get that much exercise a day and is fine.

I don't know how you can say that you shouldn't get a GSD if you don't have a fenced in yard, live in an apartment (why does THAT matter?), and can't let the dog off leash.

We've never had a fenced in yard with Frag and we've only had him off leash exercising a handful of times other than the dog park he started going to at about 8 months. You can use long leads for play, training, running on soft surfaces, and play dates with other dogs. I live in a condo and don't have any issues with Frag. I just don't see your logic. Dogs do not NEED off leash time to contemplate anything. There are plenty of dogs that do not stick around or are on leashes all of the time (like Frag) and are JUST fine.

:confused:
Yikes.
 

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Discussion Starter #19 (Edited)
I really like the idea of off leash dogs. I live in a apartment now, and one of my old neighbors would let her dog out in the morning, and Quoia would basically roam in the woods for a good 30 minutes or so and then come back and give a yelp to be let in. Quoia more or less walked herself. I think that is awesome, but I would never let a dog outside without the peace of mind of a physical fence. My neighbor backpacked all through Mexico when Quoia was just a pup. So Brandy never really used the recall, Quoia always just stuck close.
 
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