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onyx'girl said:
I don't agree with a dog wearing the collar constantly, it is a training tool and should not be worn if not in a training session.
Some dogs get "collar wise," and figure out quickly that when the collar isn't on, they can get away with things (like failing to release the sleeve after the long bite, while the handler is still 80 yards away). The collar companies also make dummy collars that weigh the same as the live ones. They should be taken off when the dog isn't supervised.

A lot of people seem to think E-collars are "cruel," (they always call them SHOCK collars, and always capitalize the word "shock"), but my dogs know that putting on the E-collar means that they're going to do protection training,as that is the only time I use one. They start whining and scratching at the crate doors when they hear me unsnap the collar's carrying case.
 

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Then when you get into a trial and the dog is looking back at the handler or flinching because they expect to be nicked. It is obvious who uses them and who doesn't while training. I don't have a problem with them, but they should not be used on a 6 month old pup, there are so many other methods of training and the e-collar is one I would wait on(prong as well). If other methods aren't working at least you have something else in the tool box, but I would first question my methods before resorting to the last resort. JMO
I agree. I've seen dogs that their "release" looks a lot like a "flinch-I'm-going-to-get-nicked." They are last resort tools. One thing I've had success with is teaching the parts of the protection routine as obedience exercises, without the stimulation of the helper being present. To teach the blind search, I sat the dog on one side of the blind, then went to the other with a tug toy. I gave the "search" command, then gave her a game of tug of war.

At the 2008 WUSV Championship in Kentucky, we all saw one dog return to the basic position, from the bark and hold, by actually screaming and flinching. That was the only time I heard the crowd boo in four days, and deservedly so (not for the dog, but for the handler; his training methods were obvious at that point).
 
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