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from everyones experience has ur GSD been easier or harder to train/teach?? how has ur experience been?? sorry if this is an old question
 

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too smart fot their own good sometimes! LoL
 

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The only challenge ive had with hannah is her being too smart! She will learn anything i tell her or teach her in a day, two at the most.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
so far ive noticed that hes smarter then i think he is i didnt know they developed this fast..he knows when hes in trouble and he seems to act up more for my g/f then me..shes a softy for animals..especially puppy's lol..im tryin to get her to "tuffin" up on him so he knows that we are both boss and not just me
 

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I think both easier and harder. Because my GSD's won't just 'do it' cause I asked or made them. I needed to learn to be SMART so I could first teach them to WANT to listen and WANT to learn, and then the same willingness to 'be in the game' and learn the new behaviors come easy.

But if I couldn't get their attention, or figure out a way to have them want to be a willing member and partner in the training, then forget it.

So cause I had to greatly improve the dog skills I though I had (and did not) I've really enjoyed learning and attending all the dog classes/seminars so I know am a much better partner in this.
 

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I've found they are easier to train than other breeds I've owned...but they also NEED more training. Otherwise, you've got a hard-headed, bossy, super-intelligent 90-pound beast trying to run your household for you.
 

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Originally Posted By: Luca_stlI've found they are easier to train than other breeds I've owned...but they also NEED more training. Otherwise, you've got a hard-headed, bossy, super-intelligent 90-pound beast trying to run your household for you.
What Tracy said.


If you train a lot when they're small pups, and make it a lot of fun, then they'll like to learn and their brains will be wired for learning. The more I train, the more trainable my dogs get. It's like they're just waiting for new things to learn.

You said something about your dog "knowing when he's in trouble." There's a book called "Culture Clash" by Jean Donaldson (you can get it at Amazon.com) that you might find really useful. It's an interesting book, has a lot of great training tips and fascinating insight into how a dog might think.
 

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Quote: Most GSDs are very smart and learn real quick.
While I absolutely agree with that, I don't agree that training GSD's are 'easy'. But not cause they are dumb and slow.

More cause they have SO much energy they can frustrate and wear most of us down. And SO smart they will get bored and test us and not keep working with us cause they would rather smell this, or look at that, or run over there...........

So I found both my GSD's took WAY more time to train. I needed alot more skills to train them than my first dog (a Labrador retriever). Way more patience. I had to become a smart trainer, because just correcting and popping the collar with the 'I said you are going to do it so you will' was just not working with the GSD's.

And the fact I had to exercise the bejeezers out of the GSD's almost every day so they'd have the edge off so they could listen and obey and learn? No more coming home, taking off my work clothes and putting my feet up to watch tv, eat dinner and veg until bedtime (or do all the family stuff and chores). Those darn GSD puppies had to be my priority for TIME management for about the first year or I had heck to pay!!!!

Thank goodness for all the wonderful dog classes, trainers and instructors who helped out!!
 

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GSD's are a piece of cake. Try training a Malamute or Chow. Or a Rottie Chow mix. GSD's seem to take pleasure in playing the learning game with you where as some other breeds really rather decide if following a command is in their best interest or yours!

But as always, caveat emptor - dogs are individuals with different learning capacities.
 

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LOL I love this one!!!! My first two seemed to just read my mind, this last girl makes me work for it. I finally found a good trainer to help me with her, but for a long time I couldnt figure out what I was doing wrong....I just ended up being "blessed" with a smarty pants that thought she should just mind when she felt like it. Be careful with dogs more intelligent than ourselves....
 

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My GSD dog has been the easiest dog to train I have ever owned, from housebreaking to search. Even with the diarrhea, he would push me around until I let he out to go.
 

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Originally Posted By: BluewolfGSD's are a piece of cake. Try training a Malamute or Chow. Or a Rottie Chow mix. GSD's seem to take pleasure in playing the learning game with you where as some other breeds really rather decide if following a command is in their best interest or yours!

But as always, caveat emptor - dogs are individuals with different learning capacities.
Totally agree! Those breeds make you appreciate the GSD even more. Not that I don't love my Chow/mixes, but whew! Some days they are exhausting.
Why am I laughing?

And I like to think of their learning capacity combined with your training capacity.

But I LOVE to work with GSD puppies. It's like working with a very smart child who likes going to school.
 

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My GSD chow mix is interesting. Very smart, very biddable, but when he's determined to focus on the cat or the dog across the street, I can yank the leash hard enough to rip off a car door and he'll just get worked up even more. He is my first chow mix and I think my last chow mix! I have oodles of respect for Jean and Melanie (IliamnasQuest) now. I would love to have an implant of one of their chow/chow mix handling brain cells.

I can see the GSD part in him, I can see the chow part in him. I can totally see that a well bred, active, drivey, intelligent GSD would be EASY to train IF you are well armed with knowledge, time, and patience.

It's an uphill battle for me regardless; I keep having to look up "patience" in the dictionary to remember what it means.
 

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Mine have been easy to train but they all had a stubborn head about something...

Prince never accepted my dad's twin brother.

Baron refused to over with a dumbbell in his mouth. He would carry the dumbbell endlessly, he would even carry it AROUND the gate, put it down and go back to go over but never could get him to go over with it in his mouth.

Rex hated his leash.

Luther never 'spoke' on command. For 5 years, he looked at me like I was retarded for getting him to try.

Gideon wouldn't stop trying to chew on small dogs.

Morgan may someday learn she IS NOT to go thunderbutting down the stairs when my children are walking down. I'm trying liverwurst right now...
 

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Training a shepher is true bliss. My boxer has agility, rally tittles and TONS of obedience titles. That said after this shepherd there is nothing like it. I would say I would never have another breed but I really like the Mals.
 

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My GSD is an European male and the easiest dog to train I have ever owned.

However, I am also acting as a rescue for a White German Shepherd Female, and I have never met a more difficult dog to train. As near as I can tell the dog had been moderately abused so my training revolves around kindness and treats. My success with this dog has not been good. She just shys away from everything.
 
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