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Discussion Starter #1
Hi! So, I changed foods for my male GSD and his ears no longer get gunky and gross, I also use a 2 step ear wash, one cleans, one turns to a powder and dries everything all out(win!). We started feeding our boy Nutrisource LBP a few weeks ago to see if it would help bulk him up and it *seems* to be helping. I guess I'm wondering though, could his lean nature be due to being unaltered? Or are some dogs just more lean? He has no symptoms of any intestinal or pancreatic problem, he always has solid poops, doesn't barf unless he eats some grass. He's getting the snip very soon since he's 2.5. I'm wondering if he still doesn't gain enough, what should I ask the vet to rule out? Our vets here charge upwards of 3x the fees where I live in comparison to the US so if I can ask for specific testing it could save me multiple vet trips. Here's a couple pictures of him, he's impossible to photograph because he immediately
moves when my camera app opens lol The food has made a major difference in his coat and my 11 year old mixes coat as well, as a side note.
 

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Discussion Starter #2
Also, the dog in the pic with him inside is our old lady who is obese and losing on weight control, she does not eat his food, our 2 year old daughter just feeds her cheese and peanut butter leftovers all the **** time. Daughter is on dog feeding crack down lol
 

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Your dog looks fine. I don't think he needs to put on weight. He looks healthy. I'd rather have a lean dog...
Okay good to know! He was a lot more boney a few weeks ago so I wasn't sure if he was still too thin or what. I'll probably switch him to the large breed adult nutrisource then. We just got another puppy so will feed her the puppy food instead. Thanks for the input
 

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You should not see hip bones on a dog. Being lean has been linked to bloat.
 

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Is there a study showing this link?
Risk Factors for Canine Bloat

Tufts' Canine and Feline Breeding and Genetics Conference, 2003

Jerold S. Bell, DVM
Tufts University School of Veterinary Medicine
North Grafton, MA, USA

"Lean dogs were found to be at higher risk than overweight dogs. It is hypothesized that this is because fat takes up space in the abdomen. The lack of fat in the abdomen of a lean dog creates a basic situation similar to that of a dog with a deep and narrow chest: A lean dog has much more room in the abdomen for the stomach to move around than a fat dog."

https://www.vin.com/apputil/content/defaultadv1.aspx?meta=Generic&pId=11165&id=3848657
 

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This is where I've been concerned with him, I feel like he should have a few more lbs on him then he ever has had.
Neutering will alter his endocrine system and reduce his metabolism so he should start to pack on the pounds and in another year you will be putting him on a diet. :wink2:
 

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Risk Factors for Canine Bloat

Tufts' Canine and Feline Breeding and Genetics Conference, 2003

Jerold S. Bell, DVM
Tufts University School of Veterinary Medicine
North Grafton, MA, USA

"Lean dogs were found to be at higher risk than overweight dogs. It is hypothesized that this is because fat takes up space in the abdomen. The lack of fat in the abdomen of a lean dog creates a basic situation similar to that of a dog with a deep and narrow chest: A lean dog has much more room in the abdomen for the stomach to move around than a fat dog."

https://www.vin.com/apputil/content/defaultadv1.aspx?meta=Generic&pId=11165&id=3848657
A hypothesis has been put out there...but it hasn't been tested or proven. Having said that, on the surface this makes "sense". I think the risk of being over weight haven been well documented, and they are beyond the hypothesis stage. I would lean toward being lean :smile2:
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Is there a study showing this link?
Risk Factors for Canine Bloat

Tufts' Canine and Feline Breeding and Genetics Conference, 2003

Jerold S. Bell, DVM
Tufts University School of Veterinary Medicine
North Grafton, MA, USA

"Lean dogs were found to be at higher risk than overweight dogs. It is hypothesized that this is because fat takes up space in the abdomen. The lack of fat in the abdomen of a lean dog creates a basic situation similar to that of a dog with a deep and narrow chest: A lean dog has much more room in the abdomen for the stomach to move around than a fat dog."

https://www.vin.com/apputil/content/defaultadv1.aspxmeta=Generic&pId=11165&id=3848657
This is interesting to read as well. Apparently his dam actually died from bloat, though, I supposed it would make sense for a dog who recently whelped litter to be more susceptible since all the organs move during and then after the pregnancy.
 

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Why would he have to be neutered? Since he not growing anymore I woud have him a little heavier, just to lightly cover the hip bones.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
This is where I've been concerned with him, I feel like he should have a few more lbs on him then he ever has had.
Neutering will alter his endocrine system and reduce his metabolism so he should start to pack on the pounds and in another year you will be putting him on a diet. /forum/images/Germanshepherds_2016/smilies/tango_face_wink.png
Naturally lol!!
 

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Why would he have to be neutered? Since he not growing anymore I woud have him a little heavier, just to lightly cover the hip bones.
It's as per contract. And we just got a female puppy that's also on a non breeding contract, so there's that. If they did the whole vasectomy/tubal in dogs where I am I'd look into that instead but they don't unfortunately.
 

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A hypothesis has been put out there...but it hasn't been tested or proven. Having said that, on the surface this makes "sense". I think the risk of being over weight haven been well documented, and they are beyond the hypothesis stage. I would lean toward being lean :smile2:
In this breed, what health risks from being average weight (no bones showing) or a few pounds over weight out weighs the risk of being a few pounds underweight and bloat? Honest question.
 

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I am in agreeance of those who feel this dog is too thin. I think “lean” is overused on this board for any dog that is not fat, even those dangerously low. Volleyball players are lean. Supermodels are skinny. (Yes, I’m generalizing). If a body condition score of 4-5 is ideal, I’m aiming for 4’s for sure.... and unless I’m looking at an athlete dog in the middle of the field during a trial, you should not see ribs. Imo, you should never see hipbones. Dogs need muscle, and some fat too.
 

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In this breed, what health risks from being average weight (no bones showing) or a few pounds over weight out weighs the risk of being a few pounds underweight and bloat? Honest question.
What's the quality of life for the animal as well? Being underweight has it's own share of health risks.

I agree with Fodder. There is a difference between being lean and being skinny and so many people on this board seem to be so terrified or disgusted by the thought of a dog being overweight that any time people ask if a dog is too thin all they get is answers that it is better than being overweight. There is a difference between thin and lean and it's okay to say that a dog could gain a few pounds to get it up to lean.
 
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In this breed, what health risks from being average weight (no bones showing) or a few pounds over weight out weighs the risk of being a few pounds underweight and bloat? Honest question.
A few pounds, likely not much . But we know that most of the dogs out there are overweight. In that case, there is alot that can and does go wrong. Hips for one. In this particular case, I don't see ribs showing. He has the hour glass...I don't know if I would say too thin. You want to see skinny...look at a picture of Remi I posted here right after he had a bout with giardia. Even I (I like lean dogs) thought it was too much. He is now on the other side of the pendulum and needs to drop a few pounds.

To me, this dog doesn't look like a 3 from this chart...But, it could be the photo...Only the owner can say for sure...

Dog Body Condition Score (BCS) Illustration | Rachele Baker, Veterinarian and Author
 

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A few pounds, likely not much . But we know that most of the dogs out there are overweight. In that case, there is alot that can and does go wrong. Hips for one. In this particular case, I don't see ribs showing. He has the hour glass...I don't know if I would say too thin. You want to see skinny...look at a picture of Remi I posted here right after he had a bout with giardia. Even I (I like lean dogs) thought it was too much. He is now on the other side of the pendulum and needs to drop a few pounds.

To me, this dog doesn't look like a 3 from this chart...But, it could be the photo...Only the owner can say for sure...

Dog Body Condition Score (BCS) Illustration | Rachele Baker, Veterinarian and Author
There is an often cited study done using Labs regarding the impact of weight on HD. The study was seriously flawed and had so many variables and the parameters were permitted to drift dramatically (such as permitting the control group of Labs to become overweight) to the point of rendering the study nearly useless yet people still cling to its skewed results today.

Bloat kills, iffy hips probably won't have much of an impact on quality of life for an average, active, companion dog.

With this particular dog, the first picture clearly shows prominent hip bones.
 
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