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Discussion Starter #1
Does anyone know if dry kibble can turn rancid after a while, or "go bad"?
I'm talking about Wellness Super 5, in particular. I know it's not supposed to have the same preservatives that some other foods contain, so I'm thinking that it can go bad if kept too long?

Riley has had loose stools for the past day and a half and I'm suspecting his chow. We're getting near the bottom of his food bin, which we don't normally do, so it's been sitting there for a while. This morning, he turned his nose up at his food (which he never does) but ran right over and tried to eat Gunner's food (which he never does!) And since Gunner is on a different food, it made me wonder.
 

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I have wondered about that also. Rocky would eat, but he was not acting like he enjoyed it much. Apollo wouldnt touch the food, so I threw away the old and bought new. I am not sure if it goes bad or somehow just changes.
 

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Somewhere - can't remember if it was Whole Dog Journal sometime back or what, but it was suggested that food storaged in plastic containers can change and/or there is something in the plastic that is not good for long periods of storage time. I keep my food in its original bag and use large clips to keep it tightly closed.
 

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I know that when we sold a bag of food at the office one time, the owner brought it back. It had gone bad. We checked the expiration date and it was past. OOPS Of course we refunded her bag (and even gave her a free one I think). Luckily she did not feed any to her dog - WGSD with LOTS of allergy problems. It was the Royal Canin SO food.

I store Gracie's food in a plastic airtight container that I got at Petsmart. It is in there less than a month -- is that dangerous?
 

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Jen I do the same thing with Rockys food. Normally last about a month.
 

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I had a brand new bag of dog food, can't remember the name since I don't buy it any more that was bad, use by date was still good.

I leave the food in the bag and put the bag in a sealed container. Since I once again have all 4 dogs eating the same food, I go through 2 bags a month.

Val
 

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I only feed kibble about three times a week, I store it in the bag in an airtight container. I go thru a 30# bag(3 dogs, TOTW) about every 6 weeks. After reading this thread, I hope it won't go bad.
 

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With the foods that are organic or preserved with a natural preservative like the tocopherals, I find that food does not last long. I have purchased a bag of food that was totally mildewed. I later found out that the whole palate was full of mildew. I also had referred a brand of food to a client that when opened was full of worms. The *better* foods don't seem to last long at all. I agree with Val...I keep all food in the bag in a sealed container...stays fresher that way.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Originally Posted By: spartshepWith the foods that are organic or preserved with a natural preservative like the tocopherals, I find that food does not last long. I have purchased a bag of food that was totally mildewed. I later found out that the whole palate was full of mildew. I also had referred a brand of food to a client that when opened was full of worms. The *better* foods don't seem to last long at all. I agree with Val...I keep all food in the bag in a sealed container...stays fresher that way.
Well, I'm thinking that might have been the problem, then. The bins we've been using aren't airtight and neither one of us can remember exactly when we reached the bottom of Riley's bin the last time, so it's been a while.
The food looked and smelled okay to me, but I have a human nose. lol. I'm sure Riley would be able to tell that it's bad long before I would!

I never gave it a second thought before. I'll be buying airtight containers tomorrow and we won't be stocking up on their food anymore, either.
 

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Originally Posted By: GunnersMom
.... neither one of us can remember exactly when we reached the bottom of Riley's bin the last time,
I don't know how much "stocking up" you do, but what I have always done is if I buy a new bag before the bin in empty, I empty out the bin into another container (or bag), pour the new bag in, then put the "leftovers" from the bin on top of the new food.

I do the same thing with the horses grain. Even if I am using something that doesn't tend to "go bad".
 

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I can't remember what dog food website I was on that addressed this. I know it was a really good one.........

It talked about the oils left behind in the plastic storage container...that get rancid and affect the food..........

They said if you must store in a plastic container...to wash the container out with hot soapy water every time it's empty and before you refill......
 

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I've had food go bad before it's expiration date. I specifically bought a container designed for dog food and I always wash it out before putting in a new bag.

I really could not smell a difference in the food, but my dogs refused it, so I brought it back to the pet store where the employee told me it had gone bad.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Good suggestions - thank you! I'll be going to Petsmart tonight, so I'm going to see if they have the containers that are specifically FOR dog food. And that's a good idea about washing it thoroughly, before putting a new bag in. I'll be doing that from now on.

Someone on the Golden forum was just telling me that heat can affect the 'better' foods, too, and make them go bad pretty quickly.

The containers we'd been using hold about two bags and we figure it's probably been two months since it got much below halfway. We'd always done that and never had a problem, but we were buying different food at the time, too. Lower quality, so maybe that's the difference.
We won't be doing it anymore, though, that's for sure! I feel like the worst mom in the world for making my baby boy sick. He has a birthday coming up on Saturday, so he can pretty much guarantee that mommy will try to make it up to him. lol.
 

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Here is an article on storing kibble..


The Natural Paw
Quote:How You Store Dry Dog Food Will Affect Your Dog’s Health.
November 19, 2007 at 3:24 am (Articles)


Keeping an open bag of dry dog food for weeks in your kitchen or garage will cause changes in the food that may lead to serious health problems. Learn how to properly store dry dog foods to help your dogs and cats live longer.





Would you keep a loaf of bread open in your kitchen for 39 days?



We hope not. That’s how long the typical opened bag of dog food lasts. Lengthy storage time and poor storage conditions lead to nutrient degradation, oxidation of fats, and infestation by molds, mites and other food spoilers. One in three dogs dies of cancer. We think improper storage at home is a major contributing factor.



Dry dog foods usually have a one-year “shelf life.” That means the food is “good” for up to one year after the manufacturing date. Many dry foods stamp a “best if used by” date on the package. This applies only to unopened bags.



High-quality dog food companies use bags that provide protection from oxygen and moisture. If the bag is intact, not enough oxygen and moisture can migrate into the food in one year to cause significant oxidation or microbial growth problems. Though problems can occur between the manufacture of food and the customer opening the bag, it’s what happens after the bag is opened that we are most concerned with in this article.



What happens after you open the bag of dog food?


As soon as you open a bag of food, oxygen, moisture, light, mold spores, storage mites, and other potential spoilers enter the bag.



Oxidation of fats

Oxidized fats may cause cancer and contribute to many chronic health problems in humans. The same is true for dogs.



Dog food companies use antioxidants (sometimes vitamin E and other natural sources) to forestall oxidation. Every time the bag is opened, oxygen enters. Eventually the antioxidants are all oxidized (used up) and some of the fats are damaged, starting with the more fragile omega –3 fatty acids.



Degradation of all micronutrients

Vitamins particularly susceptible to oxidation and damage due to long term room temperature storage include vitamin A, thiamin, most forms of folate, some forms of vitamin B6 (pyridoxal),vitamin C, and pantothenic acid. The nutrition in the food at the bottom of a bag left open 39 days will be considerably less than the nutrition in the top of the bag. Fresh is best.



Molds and mycotoxins

Storing open bags of dry dog food for 39 days in warm, humid areas (most kitchens) promotes the growth of molds. Some of the waste products of these molds (mycotoxins) are increasingly being implicated as long-term causes of cancer and other health problems in humans, poultry, pigs and other animals. Dogs are particularly susceptible to these toxins.



When dry dog foods absorb moisture from the surrounding air, the antimicrobials used by most manufacturers to delay mold growth can be overwhelmed[ii], and mold can grow. The molds that consume dry pet foods include the Aspergillus flavus mold, which produces Aflatoxin B1, the most potent naturally occurring carcinogenic substance known[iii].



You can’t see low levels of mold, and most dogs can’t taste it.[iv] While many dogs have died shortly after eating mycotoxin-contaminated foods[v], mycotoxins kill most dogs slowly by suppressing the immune system and creating long-term health problems in all organs of the body[vi].



Infestation.

Bugs, storage mites, mice, and other unpleasant invaders thrive on dry dog food. Recent research has shown that allergic dogs are frequently allergic to the carcasses of storage mites, which may infest grains, especially those grains used in low cost dry dog foods. So, daily, allergic dogs ingest a substance to which their immune system reacts negatively.



Keep food fresh!



1. Keep food in its original bag, even if you use a container. Plastics can leach vitamin C out of the food. The components of the plastics themselves may leach into the food. Rancid fat, which lodges in the pores of plastics that are not food-grade, will contaminate new batches of food.

2. Buy small, fresh bags of food; only enough to last 7 days. Look for manufacturing or “best if used by” dates on the bag. If you don’t see one, or can’t understand the code, write the manufacturer and ask where it is or how to interpret their codes.

3. Keep food dry. If the food looks moist, throw it away.

4. Keep larger bags in the freezer. This is the only way we think large quantities of food may be kept safely.

5. If the food has off color, throw it away.

6. If the food smells rancid or like paint, throw the food away.

7. If your dog says no, do not force her to eat.

8. Don’t buy bags that are torn.



Follow these simple recommendations to radically reduce the deadly toxins your dog or cat encounters.





--------------------------------------------------------------------------------


Bingham, Phillips, and Bauer. “Potential for dietary protection against the effects of aflatoxins in animals” Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association, Vol. 222, No. 5. March 1, 2003. 593.

[ii]The data we’ve seen from manufacturers of antimicrobials shows that after four days at above 12% moisture mold growth starts.
[iii] From Science News, Vol 155, No 4, January 23, 1999 p 63.


[iv] Hughes, Graham & Grieb “Overt Signs of Toxicity to Dogs and Cats of Dietary Deoxynivalenol”, Journal of Animal Sciences, 1999. 77: 699-700.



[v] Chafee and Himes, “Aflatoxicosis in Dogs,” American Journal of Veterinary Research, Vol 30, No 10, October 1969, p 1748.

[vi] Council for Agricultural Science and Technology, Ames, Iowa, USA Mycotoxins: Risks in Plant, Animal, and Human Systems January 2003 32.

copyright Steve Brown and Beth Taylor
See Spot Live Longer

this article may be reproduced for educational purposes with the above credits included


Jen
 

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Discussion Starter #15
Jen - thank you so much for posting that!
That's pretty scary.

I pitched the rest of Gunner's food, as well. His had only been stored for a couple weeks, but since the container is far less than ideal, I was afraid that it could go bad much more quickly.
Our Petsmart didn't have anything that seemed truly airtight, so we're just keeping the food inside the bag, inside the container until we can shop around tomorrow and look for good containers.

After reading that, I think we're going to start buying the small bags, too. Even if we have to stop and pick up more during the week, it's certainly worth it! Better safe than sorry.

Thanks again for posting that article! I'm going to pass that along, because I imagine there are others who never gave it a second thought. (I can't be the only idiot, right? lol.)
 

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Originally Posted By: kallie

2. Buy small, fresh bags of food; only enough to last 7 days. .


<span style="color: #FF0000">Another good way to double the cost of kibble! </span>


4. Keep larger bags in the freezer. This is the only way we think large quantities of food may be kept safely.

<span style="color: #FF0000">I don't know about everyone else, but there is NO way a 40lb bag of kibble would even FIT in my freezer if I was inclined to want to put it in there. Luckily, feeding 3 dogs, a 40lb bag doesn't last long anyway.</span>
 

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Originally Posted By: BlackGSD
Originally Posted By: kallie

2. Buy small, fresh bags of food; only enough to last 7 days. .


<span style="color: #FF0000">Another good way to double the cost of kibble! </span>


4. Keep larger bags in the freezer. This is the only way we think large quantities of food may be kept safely.

<span style="color: #FF0000">I don't know about everyone else, but there is NO way a 40lb bag of kibble would even FIT in my freezer if I was inclined to want to put it in there. Luckily, feeding 3 dogs, a 40lb bag doesn't last long anyway.</span>
This website has nothing to gain from someone buying a smaller bag verses a larger bag of dog food. This is only for "educational" purposes..The rest is common sense:) I also have a few dogs on kibble, rest on RAW, I go through a 30-40lb bag within a few weeks..I think the issue of "storage" is the main thing here..


I actually have a 30lb bag in my freezer right now..LOL Only because I ordered 2 large bags at one time, not something I do normally tho...
 

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I have a rubbermaid container that I put the open bag in (bag and all) and then seal the lid of the container. This way the plastic does nothing to the food, it is in it's original bag, protected from air AND thats a BIG AND and I STILL have the codes on the bag if there were a recall....

I have no probs with food storage at all.

Cherri
 

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Discussion Starter #19
Someone recommended these. Just ordered a couple. It looks like they'll do the trick - stainless steel, airtight...

http://homeandkennel.petedge.com/ProSele...bCategoryId=433


Originally Posted By: EastGSD and I STILL have the codes on the bag if there were a recall....

Cherri
That's something else I've never thought about either, but it's a great idea. If I don't just pop the bag and all into the new containers, I'll at least cut the codes off the bags and hang onto them for a while.
 

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Quote: Someone recommended these. Just ordered a couple. It looks like they'll do the trick - stainless steel, airtight...
I use a metal trash can, looks almost just like that, but larger..I bought it at the our feed store for like $15.00. I leave my food in the bag and just plop into the can.
 
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