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Our 2.5 year old GSD is incorrigible when it comes to having kids-or small adults- visit. When my daughter's friends come over he obsesses on them, follows them around and will attempt to hump them . So embarrassing! If we try to keep him separate from them he will whine and pant and pace. We scold him and after awhile he will calm down and just be happy being around the kids and playing...but we never leave them alone with him. How can we stop this behavior?! Is it about hormones? Dominance? Playfulness? Help!
 

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I had a neutered boy who use to do this and it was all about over excitement. My intact boy never did it. You could use these opportunities for training. I would keep him leashed or crated until calm and then only then he can come out.
 

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I read that you also have him on seizure meds. It may be that this dog is really wound up mentally and easily over stimulated. You are going to have to find the correct dosage for those seizure meds and also find legitimate ways for your dog to use his energy. If you have a fenced in yard, watching the kids chase the dog will tire out both the dog and the kids (safer for the kids to chase him than the other way around). Have teach the kids how to teach the dog some tricks. When they come over they can "put on a show". Both the kids and the dogs will love it and you should have some quiet time afterwards. I'm sure you guys can come up with even more cool and fun ideas.
 

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Yep, car2ner, he is a week on Keppra and his humping has amped up big time. Usually this is an occasional annoyance and he calms down withing an hour or so after the kid/kids arrive. But this is over the top. He's trying to hump blankets and the couch pillows. Ugh. Great ideas as far as them distracting him with play! Unfortunately running around outside with him in a no-go right now. We had a mama moose and two calves on the property this morning and there is also a brown bear at large who killed a neighbor last week. We'll have to find a place out of town to hike him. (we live in Alaska) Waiting for a call back from the vet to get a better understanding of the side effects of this med. Hoping that the cluster seizures last weekend didn't damage his brain... :(
 

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Dangerous bears and some moose!?! oh yeah, proceed with caution! Do you have a neighbor who might let you play in a barn for a while?

I hope the vet can help with the meds. I'd love to see your post in a few weeks that all is going well.
 

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If you have a fenced in yard, watching the kids chase the dog will tire out both the dog and the kids (safer for the kids to chase him than the other way around).
That is the weirdest advice I had seen here for quite some time. What will happen to the dog when he turns around and bites? Or did I read this completely incorrect?
Seizures or not, the dog needs to be under control or else be separated all times. Humping is dominating (and it is not 'hugging'). No higher ranked dog would ever tolerate it or think "Oh well, he is just over excited."
 

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That is the weirdest advice I had seen here for quiet some time. What will happen to the dog when he turns around and bites? Or did I read this completely incorrect?
I've seen lots of dogs playing by running around with running kids. Not biting or nipping. I wouldn't be letting them chase him but playing with him by running around should be fine. And if we're talking about stable dogs they shouldn't be turning around and biting kids. But with a dog that humps the running around would probably just keep him amped up. Playing tug or fetch might be a good idea, have an outlet for his energy besides the kids. Provides he can play tug safely with children. Some dogs like to bite up the rope and catch fingers.

I'd also correct each time he does it. I use a verbal correction like ah-ah or something to distract my dogs from unwanted behaviors. Find something to give him an outlet for his energy besides the humping.
 

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Was the dog humping pillows and people before he was on the medication? Does he know the command Off!?
 

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That is the weirdest advice I had seen here for quite some time. What will happen to the dog when he turns around and bites? Or did I read this completely incorrect?
Seizures or not, the dog needs to be under control or else be separated all times. Humping is dominating (and it is not 'hugging'). No higher ranked dog would ever tolerate it or think "Oh well, he is just over excited."

I would assume that adults would be keeping an eye on things and if it starts to get a bit out of control would call the kids to slow down, and then go collect the dog. I'm not suggesting a free for all. Of course if this dog gets over excited and jumps on the kids, of course this won't work. The OP knows their dog better than I and what may or may not work. If the dog is truly over stimulated and just wants to do something with all it's energy, it is good to find legitimate ways to do that.

But you are right Wolfy, that with some dogs this could be a terrible idea.
 

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My pup LOVES the chase game! And yes, her being chased is MUCH safer for the kids than the other way around! So I don't know how weird the advice is...it would certainly work for my dog! If you have a dog that might consider something like that threatening, enough to actually bite a kid chasing him, you shouldn't have him or her out playing with, or socializing, with kids in the first place! Just my 2 cents....
 

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Humping is a sign that the dog does not respect the kids. So if they chase him, they are at risk IMO. If something happens, watching from the side lines will not give you enough time to interfere. This is a dog that is not under control yet even. I may be over-cautious but I know what they are capable of. Dogs are not furry people who play by people rules.
 

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Humping is a sign that the dog does not respect the kids. So if they chase him, they are at risk IMO. If something happens, watching from the side lines will not give you enough time to interfere. This is a dog that is not under control yet even. I may be over-cautious but I know what they are capable of. Dogs are not furry people who play by people rules.

Absolutely. From text it is hard to evaluate the situation. All we can do is give advice. It is a good thing that you are presenting another side of it. I do think the first thing to do, though, is make sure this dog is getting the right dosage of meds. If it is contributing to the over stimulation problem, that would be the step in the right direction.
 

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My question was did he do this before he was on the medicine? This has launched me a medical search of the subject of satyriasis ( in humans, I don't know about dogs ) and yes it can be caused by a brain defect

" Studies on rats have linked lesions of a section of the brain called the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) with compulsive sexual behavior. This may shed some light the causes of hypersexuality in humans."

Sexual behavior causes the release of dopamine, the feel good chemical and antisiezure medicine (what is the drug he is on?) can also affect brain chemicals. Thats why I wonder if he had this obsessive behavior before he started the medicine.

Interestingly, in people " Prescription medications, such as Prozac, may be prescribed to reduce sexual urges, but the drug has not been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to treat satyriasis."

Prozac I happen to know, is also used for obsessive/compulsive disorder in both humans and animals.

I have never had to deal with this situation and most of my dogs have been females. If I had a mature dog that did this and he was not brain damaged or mentally unwell, I would teach him the OFF! command. Once he knows Off! and you are sure he knows that means to instantly stop and leave the humped object alone. Then tell him to sit (redirect) and praise him for sitting. If he did not cease and desist within 2 seconds he would get a NO! and an e collar correction. This would be the lowest setting of an e collar correction that is effective for that particular dog and situation. I would only use pillows and objects that he is humping, not children. I'm sure there are people who are better at training dogs than I am.
 

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I think he need tons more mental exercise than physical. Teach him to hunt for treats hidden inside. Make them easy at first, and watch if he is inclined to chew things up. My first GSD loved when I took the new pup training. I hid animal cookies all over the place. The kids can get involved with hiding gateman. And the tricks would be great. Search you tube. Bet you can find ones that involve the kids. Like jumping over a rope they hold still. Learning the names of his toys.
 

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"Dog tries to hump kids"

Reminds me of when I was but a wee lad......and the neighbor's cat used to try and bury me in the sandbox I would play in.......didn't help my self-esteem much.



SuperG
 

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My kids play tag with our boy... yes, he understands the rules. Lots of running and squealing and growling going on, no biting, or nipping and no one in any danger. The growling is not aggressive or a warning, it fun play growling... but I am sure if anyone who didn't know my dog heard it they would think otherwise. You need to know your dog and know what you can and can't do with your dog.
 
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