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My senior girl suffers from both environmental and food allergies. We have the food under control but this spring she got a yeast infection - black, wet skin - in her genital area. She gets baths 2-3 times a week and does get an antihistamine. The vet gave me nystatin cream as well as a round of antibiotics but nothing helps much, and I know it hurts her when she urinates. She actually has bled a little.
She's not itching herself now, and the only time she tries to lick herself is after she goes. I'm wondering what will help. I've thought of zinc oxide but not sure if that will work. I use malseb shampoo. I have an appointment with the vet tomorrow but I'm not sure that will help.
Any ideas?
 

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antibiotics are the worst thing for yeast infections... def get some probiotics into her diet.
Coconut oil in the food helps with itchy skin, you can even rub some directly onto sore spots.
I've found chicken makes my guy very itchy, so if you're feeding that maybe cut it out for a while.
 

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Thank you. She currently is on a fish dog food. I've tried raw, but she is stubborn about eating it, unlike my others, and most of the proteins she can't eat. Goo point about probiotics, I used to use them and stopped so she got some this morning. I was thinking of using an Apple cider vinegar diluted spray or using povidone iodine diluted spray, but I didn't know if that would hurt her on her genitals. I also have colloidal silver spray I use on my cuts. One of my friends who is a cattle farmer suggested athletes foot powder or spray but not sure I should use in that area.
She does get coconut oil every day and loves it. She usually gets sardines, eggs,etc as well.
 

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Do you have a forced air dryer? With baths that frequent I'd want to make sure she's fully dry afterwards.
 

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Certainly coconut oil directly on the area. Mullein or goldenseal (buy as a tea, make it strong, 1 bag per cup), - both have anti-yeast, anti bacterial properties. make a compress out of white cotton tshirt material and rest it on the area for 10 mins or so, refresh it during.


Internally - Kelp. Will take a month or so
Have the thyroid checked. Skin blackening is a symptom. Kelp will help. As well as Ashwagandha
 

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Some thoughts to consider: ;)

Thank you. She currently is on a fish dog food. My Grand-Dog was sensitive to fish. What exact brand are you feeding?

I've tried raw, but she is stubborn about eating it, unlike my others, and most of the proteins she can't eat. Have you considered Ziwi Peak?
Beef ingredients - Beef Meat (min 58%), Liver, Lung, Tripe (min 32%); Green-lipped Mussel (min 3%); Lecithin; Chicory Inulin; Dried Kelp; Parsley. Naturally preserved with mixed tocopherols; Vitamins: Vitamin D3 Supplement, Vitamin E Supplement, Thiamine Mononitrate, Riboflavin, d-Calcium Pantothenate, Folic Acid, Vitamin B12 Supplement, Thiamine Hydrochloride; Chelated Minerals: Iron amino acid complex, Copper amino acid complex, Manganese amino acid complex, Zinc amino acid complex, Selenium Yeast, Potassium Bicarbonate, Calcium Carbonate


Goo point about probiotics, I used to use them and stopped so she got some this morning. I would give it with all of her meals. Make sure it is a high quality human grade product:
Below are Human Ingredient Products made for pets:
Sunday Sundae (Digestive Enzyme & Pro-Biotic Combo: http://www.feedsentials.com/
Gut Sense (ProBiotic): http://dr-dobias-natural-healing-usa...ducts/gutsense
Digest All Plus: (Digestive Enzyme/ProBiotic combo) Wholistic Digest All Plus? - Digestive Support - Canine
Animal Essentials: (Digestive Enzyme/ProBiotic combo)Plant Enzyme w/ Probiotics 3.5 oz 100 gm - Animal Essentials


You can also add some fresh minced garlic.

Garlic is a powerful antimicrobial and antibiotic and is effective in fighting various forms of internal or external bacterial, viral, or fungal infection. Garlic stimulates immune functions in the bloodstream by increasing the activities of killer cells. It is therefore beneficial for dogs with suppressed immune systems. Garlic has detoxifying effects. At least six compounds contained in garlic can enhance liver function by helping the liver to eliminate toxins from the body, thereby preventing toxic accumulation. It also aides in digestion.
per Dr. Pitcarin : Book: Natural Health For Dogs & Cats: Page 117/chart page 118:
Suggested amounts daily of Garlic
*10 to 15 pounds – half a clove
*20 to 40 pounds – 1 clove
*45 to 70 pounds – 2 cloves
*75 to 90 pounds – 2 and a half cloves
*100 pounds and over – 3 cloves


I was thinking of using an Apple cider vinegar diluted spray or using povidone iodine diluted spray, but I didn't know if that would hurt her on her genitals. Should be fine with a weaker solution

I also have colloidal silver spray I use on my cuts. Great choice!

One of my friends who is a cattle farmer suggested athletes foot powder or spray but not sure I should use in that area. :eek: :eek: :eek:

She does get coconut oil every day and loves it. She usually gets sardines, eggs,etc as well. Great!
Are you positive she doesn't have a "chicken" sensitivity?


She gets baths 2-3 times a week MANY shampoo's contain grains:
IF you have a dog that is sensitive to grains, beware of other GLUTEN BASED ingredients, with names that we do not recognize
WHEAT: hydrolyzed wheat protein or triticum vulgare (wheat) or stearyldimoniumhydroxypropyl (hydrolyzed wheat protein) or hydroxypropyltrimonium (hydrolyzed wheat protein).
OATMEAL: or avena sativa
BARLEY: hordeum vulgare or maltodextrin (can also be from barley)
RYE: secale cereale
Hydrolyzed Vegetable Protein can be derived from: Soy, Corn, or Wheat

Over 75% of the immune system lies in the gut so it is VERY important to keep it healthy to fight off allergen's and MANY other things.

Dr. Jeanette Thomason: Quote: When our dog's immune system is healthy, the body is able to destroy the yeasts and keep them under control. However, when the immune system is weak, the yeast, being an opportunistic feeder, may produce in mass amounts causing toxins that disable the immune system and prevent it from functioning properly. At this point, the system becomes altered causing a host of health problems. So, It goes without saying that an overgrowth of yeast toxins will affect your pet's immune system, nervous system, and their endocrine system. Since these systems are all inter-connected, yeast toxins play a major role in causing allergies, bladder infections, skin disorders and many other health problems.
Normally, the large intestine hosts a balance of beneficial bacteria (Lactobacillus acidophilus and Lactobacillus bifidus) along with yeast. The harmful Candida is usually kept in check by the Lactobacillus bacteria, partially by the production of lactic acid. Candida actually provides growth factors for Lactobacillus. They exist in a natural balance, until something happens to upset that balance.

The main cause of yeast infections, such as Candida Albicans, could be caused from any of the following: grain-based foods, drugs, chemicals and poisons on your lawns, cooked foods, anything in a can or a bag, vaccines which compromise and destroy the natural immune system, antibiotics which kill the friendly bacteria (which, would ordinarily fight and overwhelm the yeast), steroids (that shut down the body's ability to fight back), any and all other drugs, chemicals and poisons, including frontline, advantage, program, heart guard, etc, can compromise the immune system. Unquote.





mercolahealthypets.com: "The nutrition your dog receives either supports his immune system to keep yeast growth under control, or it does the opposite and exacerbates a yeast overgrowth situation. For dogs with yeast, I recommend an anti-yeast diet, which is also called an anti-inflammatory or species appropriate diet.



Yeast uses sugar as a source of energy. We know that carbs break down into sugar, so the first thing yeasty patients (human or canine) need to do is remove sugar from the diet. And remember that dietary sugar isn't just the white stuff -- it's also honey and high-fructose corn syrup listed on the ingredients panel. Even white and sweet potatoes can feed a yeast problem, along with the tapioca found in grain-free dry foods.
I recommend an entirely grain-free and carb-free diet for patients who have yeast. This step is extremely important. It's impossible to effectively deal with a yeast problem without addressing your pet's diet, regardless of how many supplements or baths you give him. Your dog's nutrition should help keep his normal flora levels balanced.
I also recommend adding a few natural, antifungal foods to the diet, for example, small amounts of fresh garlic, thyme, parsley, and oregano to help reduce the level of yeast naturally. Adding fermented veggies, if your dog will eat them, can also be very beneficial. Raw, unfiltered apple cider vinegar and coconut oil have natural antifungal properties and can be added directly to your dog's meals."


http://www.thewholedog.org/ArtYeast.html
Is she spade?
Has her thyroid levels been checked recently?
"Often times, thyroid problems in dogs are accompanied by a systemic yeast overgrowth."

Moms :)
 

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The yeast is usually just an opportunist, setting up shop where there's already a problem. The key is figuring out what the underlying problem is that's creating the opening. I've rarely seen yeast as a "solo" issue--look for what else is going on (allergy, other infection/staph, parasites, bladder infection/UTI...there will likely be something more here that's creating the opening for the yeast).

Did the vet do a urinalysis and also send the urine out to a lab for culturing? Have we ruled out a bladder or UT infection? Blood in the urine requires immediate investigation -- those infections can move fast and are very painful. You want to catch them before they move into the bladder (or worse, kidneys). To give you a sense of how seriously I treat this urine issue, if a foster calls me with a dog that's painful urinating and/or with blood in the urine, I want them to see the vet same day for urinalysis--next morning at the latest.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Thank you all. Her original issue started from environmental allergies. During fall and spring she chews and licks herself. Usually with Malseb baths and an antihistamine I've been able to keep it under control. Not this year though. She doesn't have blood in her urine, sorry I didn't explain that better. It's because she licks herself raw.
She eats Taste of the Wild Salmon or Nature's Domain. At one point I was using Pro plan sensitive skin, which worked better for awhile but not now. She does have food allergies, but environmental is really the culprit. During the summer and winter I can feed anything without issue.
During Spring and especially the fall I can't feed beef, chicken, venison, buffalo, lamb, etc. I didn't even think of eggs being an issue. She only gets that once or twice a week but I'll take that off the menu.
I thought the athletes foot spray or powder was a crazy idea but apparently it's used for jock itch and can be used for women's yeast infections. Crazy, but I guess there is some basis to it.
I think the vet checked the thyroid back in January when we did a senior check up but I will check.
 

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Find out even if the thyroid panel was done, was it comprehensive or basic T4. Also, even if falls within "normal range" which is wide...is it on the low end of normal?


Kelp will help.
Also, see if there is a specialized test for zinc deficiency.


GSD's are prone to this much like sled dogs.
 

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I wouldn't apply apple cider spray to the area - that will seriously sting!!! Just the thought has me crossing my legs :)

I have no idea about athletes foot stuff - first time I've heard of that.
 

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You can spray Vetericyn. It won't sting, and it will take down the microbe count. I know this because when I had a small cut and a scrape, I sprayed it on myself to see how it felt on the dog's wounds. It felt like water -- no stinging sensation at all. It will help with the bleeding, oozing areas. You can spray a few times a day safely.
 

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I've used Lotrimin spray on my girl. I sprayed her feet, between her toes, her belly and genitals. It should not sting if she is not too raw. There is a triple baby butt paste that is effective on babies. I don't let her lick or chew until the spray has dried. And I've been known to use a Vagisil copy cream to NUMB the areas. You can wipe them dry with a paper towel or cloth.

When we were given the dog, I was told she had food allergies, namely chicken meal. I didn't used to believe in allergies but she is definitely reactive when she gets carbs like wheat, potatoes, rice.

I hope yours feels better soon. Mine had similar episodes where it mimicked a UTI but was most likely started with yeast issues. Glad to know someone else has noticed the same thing.
 

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I've used Lotrimin spray on my girl. I sprayed her feet, between her toes, her belly and genitals. It should not sting if she is not too raw. There is a triple baby butt paste that is effective on babies. I don't let her lick or chew until the spray has dried. And I've been known to use a Vagisil copy cream to NUMB the areas. You can wipe them dry with a paper towel or cloth.

When we were given the dog, I was told she had food allergies, namely chicken meal. I didn't used to believe in allergies but she is definitely reactive when she gets carbs like wheat, potatoes, rice.

I hope yours feels better soon. Mine had similar episodes where it mimicked a UTI but was most likely started with yeast issues. Glad to know someone else has noticed the same thing.
I didn't really believe in them at all either, but I noticed the difference when I stopped chicken in his kibble. But what really swung my opinion was a few weeks ago we gave him some chicken gravey from a roast we had cooked so it would have been quite concentrated and gosh was he itchy and scratchy. A few days of no chicken and back to normal... I guess there are such things as food allergies for dogs :D:D:D
 

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I didn't really believe in them at all either, but I noticed the difference when I stopped chicken in his kibble. But what really swung my opinion was a few weeks ago we gave him some chicken gravey from a roast we had cooked so it would have been quite concentrated and gosh was he itchy and scratchy. A few days of no chicken and back to normal... I guess there are such things as food allergies for dogs :D:D:D
What you ended up doing by happenstance was actually an allergy "challenge" -- part of the mode of diagnosis used by evidence-based vets. That's a really useful thing - as it confirms the chicken hypothesis.

You've read a lot here about elimination diets to figure out allergies -- that's only step 1. The second step after the elimination has worked is to challenge the dog with the suspected food allergen and see if it provokes a response to confirm it's been correctly identified. That's what you did here!

A lot of people resist step 2 because once you've got an allergy dog healthy, who wants to go back? Many GP vets shrug and don't worry about nudging clients to do the challenge because a healthy dog is the goal anyway, and what works is what works. However, the derms (allergy specialists) tend to want to do it, to be sure the diagnosis is right.

Food allergies are SO hard to zero in on, but kudos on confirming you've got it identified!!!
 
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