German Shepherds Forum banner

41 - 60 of 121 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,847 Posts
I can tell you with absolute certainty that this avoidance and lack of affection is not "just the puppy's temperment!". As others have said GSDs typically like to be around you without a lot of interaction.

This is our 4th dog and we’ve never experienced this. It might just be her temperament. The environment couldn’t be more comfortable for her. Maybe too comfortable? She is never left alone and is always interacting with us. I don’t think it’s the training or lack of interaction.
You asked for advice, and people have given you, pretty consistently, the same advice. The training and the constant, and likely from your puppy's perspective overwhelming, interaction ARE the problem! But hey, what you do with that information is ENTIRELY up to you! Good luck, and let us know how things work out!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
63 Posts
Discussion Starter #42 (Edited)
I can tell you with absolute certainty that this avoidance and lack of affection is not "just the puppy's temperment!". As others have said GSDs typically like to be around you without a lot of interaction.

This is our 4th dog and we’ve never experienced this. It might just be her temperament. The environment couldn’t be more comfortable for her. Maybe too comfortable? She is never left alone and is always interacting with us. I don’t think it’s the training or lack of interaction.
You asked for advice, and people have given you, pretty consistently, the same advice. The training and the constant, and likely from your puppy's perspective overwhelming, interaction ARE the problem! But hey, what you do with that information is ENTIRELY up to you! Good luck, and let us know how things work out!
I agree. I already said we would back off for a while and see how it goes. Don’t misunderstand me, it’s not avoidance. She wants to be around. Follows us from room to room. Always wants to be nearby. Comes to me for play and nudges me with her toy. It’s not avoidance. Even in public (controlled environment) if I have her off leash, she follows me... She just seems more affectionate with others than us. We’ll try the backing off a bit approach. Thanks. (That face though!)
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,728 Posts
We have been part of the training didn’t read the entire post? For the first 2 months it was all in home. Now, maybe a day or 2 a week she goes there to learn and interact. We train her everyday. The center is mostly for socializing because it’s done in a group environment. The last thing I wanted was an aggressive GSD. I purposely didn’t send her away for 2 weeks like some people do. She’s with us everyday. She will follow us from room to room and outside to play. She wants to be “around”.
First of all, this is a breed that has been genetically bred to possess a modicum of human aggression. It is a part of the breed standard. All the training in the world is not going to change your dog's genetics. So the last thing that you wanted just may be what you get when your dog matures. Right now she is still just a baby and who she is at two years of age or older might be very different.

I have noticed that many GSDs show their affection just by wanting to be with you or near you and often can be very undemonstrative. It can vary with the individual but this is not a breed known to fawn on people despite being noted for being the most loyal.

What fun and adventures do you have with your dog? What do you do that satisfies her drives? What does she look forward to doing with you?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,758 Posts
Back off and let her start wanting you like you want her. Only give attention when she comes to you. She will learn that coming to you brings pleasure to her.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,758 Posts
Oh, now I see you have started a whole nuther thread about this.

I haven't read it all but it impresses me that with all these other trainers and doggy daycares she has never really socialized to your 'pack' and has no good engagement. Its like --ohhh these people again-- ho hum....
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
63 Posts
Discussion Starter #46
First of all, this is a breed that has been genetically bred to possess a modicum of human aggression. It is a part of the breed standard. All the training in the world is not going to change your dog's genetics. So the last thing that you wanted just may be what you get when your dog matures. Right now she is still just a baby and who she is at two years of age or older might be very different.

I have noticed that many GSDs show their affection just by wanting to be with you or near you and often can be very undemonstrative. It can vary with the individual but this is not a breed known to fawn on people despite being noted for being the most loyal.

What fun and adventures do you have with your dog? What do you do that satisfies her drives? What does she look forward to doing with you?
Of course I know GSD’s are protective. I’ve had one before. As far as aggression goes, I’m sure you’ve seen posts about leash aggression, dog aggression, etc.. I wanted a dog that was a properly trained GSD. I know I can’t train a GSD to be a poodle.. I know what I have.

For fun we either play tug with a rope toy, catch, frisbee catch, kick a ball around, I have a flirt pole, 3 acre fenced in yard to play in - we do a lot. She will pick up bee favorite toy and nudge me with it when she wants to play. She shows attentiveness and affection that way.

It just surprised me when she became a lap dog fawning over friends and family. A totally different side of her comes out with visitors. Again, I’m glad it’s like that other than the other posts I read about overly aggressive dogs that don’t like other people or animals. Good questions, thanks.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,758 Posts
So I read the other thread and THIS is what I'd do. Listen to Tim, he knows what he is talking about

" Not sure what a "trainer" would do with a young puppy in the first 2 months you've had it...

For me the first 2 months was about potty training, getting to know each other, and bonding. There was some "light" training going on too, but mostly that time was about just learning each other and playing and exploring together.

Doggy daycare is not training, nor is it socialization! And in this situation is likely contributing to your pup's lack of engagement with you. I'd stop that if it were me having this issue. I'd also temporarily stop her interaction with people outside of the family.

That being said, my take on this is that your puppy is responding to its environment, and I'm with @jax in that it sounds like you're overdoing the affection to the point that you've actually taught your puppy to avoid you! That sounds harsh, but I'm not trying to be mean! Very few puppies of any breed like hugs and kisses. Some tolerate it better than others, but few actually like it.

To turn things around I'd try ignoring her, like @jax suggested, for a few days. I'd also put away all toys, both inside and out, and only bring one out when you decide it's time to play. When play time is over put the toy away again. When your puppy does engage you, give her a stroke or two and go about your business, no hugging or kissing or animated excitement.

I'd also have the rest of the family stop any and all "training" for now. Dogs, and especially puppies, can get confused and shut down when faced with multiple trainers who use differing techniques. Let the puppy work only with you for now, and be consistent and spend some time training everyday - like 15-20 minutes to start. And because your dog is sort of "aloof" with you, dial way back on any affection you're inclined to show the dog while training, use only your voice for praise when she gets something right and give her a treat! I like to use hot dog slices, but you can and should use whatever your dog is willing to work for. My dog is a food hound, and will work hard for any food item!

Anyway, I think if you try these things you'll see a change for the better! Good luck, and let us know how it goes..."
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
63 Posts
Discussion Starter #48
Oh, now I see you have started a whole nuther thread about this.

I haven't read it all but it impresses me that with all these other trainers and doggy daycares she has never really socialized to your 'pack' and has no good engagement. Its like --ohhh these people again-- ho hum....
I did both at the same time because I wasn’t sure where to post...

It sort of is like “oh those people again”.. Simettimes when I pick her up from training, I see other people picking up their dogs and the dogs are so excited to see them. Then mine comes out, sees me and makes a u-turn to go back...

Yes, some of the trainers have said “oh, how strange she hasn’t bonded to anyone in the house. Who feeds and plays with her?” Uh, me....
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,758 Posts
So, again, this doggy daycare is another 'training center'. Other people are training this dog and rewarding this dog that are not you. She gets to work for and please other people not in the family.

This 'who could not love this face' picture above- I see a dog that looks wary in her eyes. Like a dog that has been loved to death.

I would advise doing what Tim says. Only you train, and don't go over board with the praise, a couple of shoulder strokes and turn away. Leave her wanting more.

Also, your little dominant dog- do you suppose in the pack dynamic the little dog 'owns' your family? its just a thought. I own a miniature stallion. (and also full size Arabian stallion). Dinky constantly bites my good natured stallion. He chases and runs my dairy cow. He would probably kill her calf. He has small man syndrome. I'll bet your shizu has small man syndrome and into this world comes a baby puppy.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,728 Posts
Oh, now I see you have started a whole nuther thread about this.

I haven't read it all but it impresses me that with all these other trainers and doggy daycares she has never really socialized to your 'pack' and has no good engagement. Its like --ohhh these people again-- ho hum....
I wish I had seen this one first before commenting on the other.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,758 Posts
This going to doggy daycare/training center- in my opinion thats enough of that. She is now socialized to other dogs and people- maybe too socialized to other people. She follows you around and wants to play- this is good and is normal. It seems the dissonance here is about her behavior to other people who come into the home- she is all over them.

This is an undesirable behavior in the opinion of most GSD people. They are not supposed to go be all over your company in your home. Normally, people put their dogs up in kennels or crates when company comes. After all the excitement is over, the GSD is let out and good manners are expected and enforced. For instance, they would be dragging a leash and when a known command is disobeyed, they are given a (gasp) leash correction for willful disobedience. Such an intelligent breed as GSD it does not take much. This is a normal expectation in puppy training. You are going to have to do this training in your home, not some trainer.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
6,025 Posts
No need to start identical threads.If it's in a wrong forum someone will move it.
I can't merge this particular one over to the other one but I sent up the Bat Signal.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
63 Posts
Discussion Starter #54
This going to doggy daycare/training center- in my opinion thats enough of that. She is now socialized to other dogs and people- maybe too socialized to other people. She follows you around and wants to play- this is good and is normal. It seems the dissonance here is about her behavior to other people who come into the home- she is all over them.

This is an undesirable behavior in the opinion of most GSD people. They are not supposed to go be all over your company in your home. Normally, people put their dogs up in kennels or crates when company comes. After all the excitement is over, the GSD is let out and good manners are expected and enforced. For instance, they would be dragging a leash and when a known command is disobeyed, they are given a (gasp) leash correction for willful disobedience. Such an intelligent breed as GSD it does not take much. This is a normal expectation in puppy training. You are going to have to do this training in your home, not some trainer.
Most of the training is done by us at home now.

I’m curious, what do most of you do with your dog when you’re working? Isn’t it better for her to be in training rather than a crate all day, no? She sleeps in her crate at night, but I don’t crate her during the day. These dogs need activity and exercise and it would be wrong to crate or kennel if there’s an alternative. Please let me know.

Also, the behavior with friends and family isn’t “undesirable”. I’m not talking about jumping. I was talking about affection - licking, sitting in their lap, pet requests, etc. all positive behaviors, not negative. That wasn’t the tone of my post and I apologize if it was.

Anyway, other than crating all day, what do you suggest I do with my dog if everyone is working and/or at school, or just needs to be out for the day? Thanks again.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
63 Posts
Discussion Starter #56 (Edited)
Haha! She was sleeping and had just gotten up to have some water. She’s bright eyed and bushy tailed trust me.

There hasn’t been any mindless “daycare” it was a bad choice of words. It’s always been training whenever we’ve left her for the day. Even if we have to go out of town and board her, the training center takes her during the day.

Also, your little dominant dog- do you suppose in the pack dynamic the little dog 'owns' your family? its just a thought. I own a miniature stallion. (and also full size Arabian stallion). Dinky constantly bites my good natured stallion. He chases and runs my dairy cow. He would probably kill her calf. He has small man syndrome. I'll bet your shizu has small man syndrome and into this world comes a baby puppy.
The little one dominates over the GSD but definitely doesn’t rule the house. They’re both females (spayed).

I’m going to try the backing off thing and see how it goes. I think maybe I’ve painted a worse picture than it is. Sometimes she’ll come over and give a sniff and maybe a lick and be on her way. She’s not totally disconnected and she loves to train & play with us. No matter who’s over she brings her toy to me to play. It’s not all bad. She just seems more excited with new people that’s all.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
63 Posts
Discussion Starter #58
I see some of these other posts with aggressive dog problems, so I guess this is better....
Darn tootin', it's better! I wouldn't trade my guy for the world, but good gravy, he is a handful.
Lol! You know how they say the grass is always greener? I start reading some of these posts and I’m feeling pretty good about my situation. She may not be the “mushiest” GSD ever but she’s well behaved without e and pinch collars.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
5,467 Posts
Sounds like you need to work on engagement, and not just learning commands. Does she have a favorite person in your home?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
63 Posts
Discussion Starter #60
Sounds like you need to work on engagement, and not just learning commands. Does she have a favorite person in your home?
15 minutes a day of practicing and then all play. There’s plenty of engagement. Most people on the thread have said less engagement and that I’m smothering her....
 
41 - 60 of 121 Posts
Top