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Hi all,

My cute little girl is 18 months and and she came to heat on 5th July and joint her with the male on 13th, 14th and 16th (ie., 9, 10 and 12th day) and my breeder said that they had a good lock and it should be successful one.

But she is still bleeding. I checked with the Breed and he said nothing to worry.. is this normal or do I need to take her to vet?

Am really worried and hope to get a clarity on this.

She is my first dog and I dont have much experience with breeding :(
 

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Well, first off you shouldn't be breeding if you don't have experience. And if this guy is allowing it, he shouldn't be either. Call your vet, don't take a chance on it. I'm sure there is an experience breeder on here that could give you more insight.
 

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I was looking at your first post (4/27) You said she was thin and had not had her first heat yet (then she was 14 mos old). So, you bred her on her first heat at 18 months old? Is that correct?
 

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When and how much a female bleeds during heat can differ. The best way to time mating is tracking progesterone.
 

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I was looking at your first post (4/27) You said she was thin and had not had her first heat yet (then she was 14 mos old). So, you bred her on her first heat at 18 months old? Is that correct?
Good question? Why are you even breeding an 18 month old dog?
 

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Well, first off you shouldn't be breeding if you don't have experience. And if this guy is allowing it, he shouldn't be either. Call your vet, don't take a chance on it. I'm sure there is an experience breeder on here that could give you more insight.
This. Exactly this.. You shouldn't be breeding at all if you don't have the knowledge and know how. I really feel for your bitch and any pups from the litter she may drop. I just rescued a litter from an inexperienced BYB, and 2 pups suffered and died because she didn't know what she was doing. The rest of the pups were extremely ill when I got them, and the bitch was skin and bones.

And breeding at her first heat? SMH. I'll stop now before I say anything that will get me sent to a time-out.
 

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I agree with all the above but what's done is done so from here lets all help Kelvin so the chances for healthy pups and mom are better than they are now and stop the bashing before it gets out of hand.
 

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To the vet for a total going over to make sure she is healthy and no concerns at this time. Then the best diet you can afford to provide. Regular vet checks and start reading about breeding so you can be prepared for what to expect during whelping etc. It's very important that you educate yourself now so as not to risk losing mom and pups along the way. There are many complications that can arise.
 

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Yes, females bleed after being bred. They usually bleed for 21 days total (some longer, some shorter) whether bred or not.
 

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ADMIN Hat on:

EASY on the OP. He/she is not in the states. Different ideologies are followed in different countries and attacking and berating the OP is not helpful.
 

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I just have some confusion. The op's post on 4/27 said she had not had her first heat yet. Then, there was a post on 4/30 that said he noticed some blood. Was there one continuous heat that started 4/30 or two heats with another that is going on now 10 weeks later? That was going to be my question to him.

That is what I was hoping to find out. Then I was going to ask others if this is normal. It would concern me if it's not normal and increase the urgency to see a vet for the dog's safety IMO. Maybe some one can share on either scenario if he does not respond, (he may read it anyway:)
 

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Deja had, what my breeder called, a false first heat and a few months later a real one.
To the OP: do you know people who are experienced in raising litters? Doesn't have to be GSDs. You may want to ask them to help you with advice as it can be quite the task.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Thank you all for your responses on my query. Let me make myself clear on this. My girl came to heat on 25th April and there were only few drops on the floor and I consulted with my Vet and she confirmed that she was in heat (maybe a silent one).

And now again she came to heat on 5th July but the bleeding was heavy, so took her to vet and she told that few dogs can have heat in next 3 months too.

Regarding my last post in April, I was worried more about her behavior (soft Character) and too lean than the heat issue. And you guys were really helped me and it worked and she gained some weight. If you guys ask me how, I would say a change in diet. Initially I was giving her Science hill plan in the morning and boiled chicken liver mixed with rice in the evening. Then one my friend suggested to give Solid gold Sundancer in the morning and boiled Chicken liver, smashed sweet potato, egg and curd mixed with rice. It made wonders in just 2 months time and she gained few Kilograms.

Moving on to the breeding section, I checked with the Breeder (who is also Sarah's trainer) and Vet when I saw few drops in her vulva and they confirmed that she is very healthy and can be bred. You might also have a doubt why in 18 months and why not in next cycle... I live in Chennai, India, Which is very hot in summer and our summer is from April to June. So if I plan for next cycle the whelping period would be very near to summer and the puppies will have a very hard time.

Sarah is my princess and please I will never and ever think about putting her into trouble at any point. You guys may ask me to spay her.. Yes I will do it and at the same time I dont want to deprive her from the natural urge of pleasure. So decided to bred only once and I will be thinking of spaying her on the right time.

Why breed if I dont have knowledge... Come on guys, no one is experienced by birth.. we all learn every day. You guys would have learnt from your parents or might have had few dogs earlier. I may not have knowledge now, but sure will learn learn and learn and give the best to her.

Sorry my mother tongue is not English and there may be some errors, but I think I have communicated what I am thinking.

Hope you guys can help now... TIA.

There are several more questions on the way....lol
 

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Hi Kelvin

Thank you for answering the questions I had. I had considered that things may be different in India that would affect the decision to breed a dog, or not.

I read an article published in India on this subject. Here is the link;

germanshepherd.co.in/german-shepherd-breeders

If you scroll down past the list of breeders in India you will find an article titled;

The Decision to Breed or not to breed

This is a good read and I think will help you understand a little more about some of the feedback you have received. It's a lot to explain in a post, but I think this article explains very well. It would be interesting to hear your thoughts about the article, then - as other posters have commented - what's done is done and hopefully you will receive the help you want with your questions.
 

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germanshepherd.co.in/german-shepherd-breeders



If you scroll down past the list of breeders in India you will find an article titled;



The Decision to Breed or not to breed

This is a GREAT article!! I wish more people would take this seriously!! There should be one for dogs in general I would love to share it with my friends that don't understand why we don't just breed our beagles to the beagles at the farm down the road ?.
Thank you for sharing this.
 

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This is a GREAT article!! I wish more people would take this seriously!! There should be one for dogs in general I would love to share it with my friends that don't understand why we don't just breed our beagles to the beagles at the farm down the road ?.
Thank you for sharing this.
When the mod put a warning on about not beating this guy up too much, I was curious about views in other countries. Apparently, the thoughts on this are universal, at least in countries where quality dog ownership is established.

I must admit, when I got my female a year ago, the possibility crossed my mind of breeding her. It wasn't until I found this site that I knew it would be wrong, and I really struggled with that. The first thing that really knocked me down was the "selecting a suitable mate". I had no idea how complicated the selection process was and that when one seemingly selects to offset flaws, they may in fact magnify flaws.

The second reason is simply the risk to my dog's health. This breed (and probably every breed at this point) is not guaranteed to deliver without possible complications. Overall health and vitality has been compromised and there's no reason that would not carry over into potential litter problems as well. It makes me sad in a way. But, now that I've lived with this beautiful girl for a year - I would never do anything to risk her health and possibly be responsible for bringing more unwanted pups into this world.
 

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I think that's a common thing when people get a dog that they love, they just want "mini" thems lol

I have a friend who has a black lab that she bought from a BYB, she said she wants to use him as a stud and keep a puppy. Once I pointed out to her that her poor dog is clearly dysplastic in the front and the back, and told her all the risks and MONEY involved in breeding, I think I made her change her mind.

Good breeding can be very complicated.
 

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I never understood that mentality. Wanting to breed. To me, it always seemed like such hard work, such risk to the bitch, and high costs to raise and vet the pups. The only registered dog I've owned was a golden, and my ex husband wanted to breed her. I told him he was crazy, and he was on his own, refused to help him in any way with it. He did a bit (and I mean a very little bit) of research into it and quickly changed his mind ;)

It's interesting to me to get others views. I like seeing things from other points of view, even when I can't understand it myself.

But I get the other side of people shaking their heads at me. I have 4 human children, and would have had many more if my body hadn't betrayed me early on. So I guess I do have the "mini me" complex going on, just not with the furry variety of breeding ;)
 

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18 months old is young, but it used to be common practice to breed at this age. A bitch should be pretty much mature in growth and a bit young is better than being older (over 5) when that first litter comes.

I would not take a bitch to the vet just to have a check up prior to pregnancy. Totally unnecessary for a young, healthy bitch. Health checks, like x-raying the hips and elbows should be done close to the mid point between heats, and certainly not after the dog has been bred/is pregnant. So please do not let anyone convince you to do that.

People need to stop being hysterical over things like dogs eating onions, dogs in cars, breeding a young bitch. In the wild that bitch would have probably already dropped a litter.

To the OP, if you trust your breeder, ask your questions of your breeder. On here, you will get a lot of people who have never whelped or raised a litter telling you everything you should have done or not done, and plenty that you should do or shouldn't do. The problem is, if you aren't experienced, how do you separate the wheat from the chaff? You know your breeder has produced litters and since they orchestrated the breeding, they should be willing and able to give you solid advice on how to proceed from here.

I just want to note a few things:

1. The most likely time for a bitch to abort naturally is the first couple of weeks when the pups are floating around in there unattached. Keep unnecessary stress to a minimum. If she does abort, she will usually just resorb the puppies. And come time for puppies, there just won't be any.

2. The puppies aren't even the size of grapes at this point. Most of the weight gain is in the final 3 weeks of their pregnancy. Try not to over-feed her for the first month or more, and keep up regular exercise. She will be better off fit, with good muscle-tone to take on the rigors of whelping.

3. Don't supplement calcium. After the puppies are born, giving her white ice cream, yogurt, cheese, and the like are good, but you can run into trouble if you supplement with calcium/calcium pills prior to birth and then give up on them when the puppies are a few weeks old and strong. The thing is, they are drinking more than ever at this point, and if you supplemented during pregnancy, her body might not naturally take in Calcium. So, at tht point she will run dangerously low in calcium and that can be fatal.

It's not rocket science. Babies have been born for thousands of years, and most of them in much worse conditions than our current dogs will whelp in.
 
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