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Discussion Starter #1
We have Bella, 1 year old, VERY shy and timid.

We have the opportunity to get her a playmate, Shelby (4 months olds, female)

My question is, what concerns/challenges are there with owning 2 females?

I really want another GSD because I think it might help Bella come out of her shyness shell.

Any feedback would be appreciated!!!


Thanks!!
 

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Two females - challenges and concerns:
http://www.germanshepherds.com/forum/general-behavior/140526-two-female-gsd.html
http://www.germanshepherds.com/foru...94-dominance-between-my-two-females-help.html
http://www.germanshepherds.com/forum/general-information/169478-2-females-one-house-bad-idea.html
http://www.germanshepherds.com/foru...tt-female-gsd-owners-can-2-live-together.html
http://www.germanshepherds.com/forum/aggression-good-bad-ugly/244402-2-females.html
http://www.germanshepherds.com/forum/general-information/104474-2-females-same-household-issues.html
http://www.germanshepherds.com/foru...-female-pups-get-along-other-female-dogs.html
http://www.germanshepherds.com/forum/general-information/137560-multiple-females.html

I really want another GSD because I think it might help Bella come out of her shyness shell.
Stop this mindset - one dog will not magically improve another shy and nervy dog - you are more likely to make the new one worse as she is younger and will mirror the older female.

It is up to YOU to socialize, manage, contain, and train your timid female. The introduction of a baby puppy is not going to change a genetically shy, nervy, and spooky dog - she is who she is and you must work around this issue. Training and socialization is up to you - not another dog.

It is possible that Bella can be socialized and trained to overcome her issues and increase confidence, but you will have to accept the fact that she might be that way *genetically* - meaning this is just who she is and all the training in the world might not change her core temperament.

In this case, it is an issue of management and containment. I have had genetically spooky dogs - once it became clear they will not change and this is their base temperament, I focused on management and containment - made life comfortable for the dog and myself - but I did not expect anything further than what the dog was genetically capable of....
 

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Stop this mindset - one dog will not magically improve another shy and nervy dog - you are more likely to make the new one worse as she is younger and will mirror the older female.
Only if another dog gives her security. But that does not happen over night.

It worked with Yukon but he knew the female since he was a pup, so she gave him Security and it helped him heal. His issues were not genetic though.
 

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I don't think it is a good idea to let one nervy puppy raise another baby puppy....
I don't think it is a good idea for puppies to raise each other period.
 

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A 1 year old isn't going to 'raise' the other. The new pup will have her own personality and it won't be affected by the current pup. If the new pup has a sound temperament it may become the alpha dog, I stress 'may'. The current dog, if overly timid, will likely have problems dealing with an open, inquisitive puppy and take the pup's playfulness as threatening. My opinion is that, with a LOT of supervision, they could become friends. But I wouldn't assume it will happen. If you really want to try it, make sure you can return the pup after a month if it doesn't work out within that period. A pup that young won't be 'damaged' by only one month's stay.
 

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I don't think it is a good idea to let one nervy puppy raise another baby puppy....
I don't think it is a good idea for puppies to raise each other period.
Agreed. It is not a good idea. If the dog has shortcomings, a puppy is not the way to go. In my boys case, both dogs were adult dogs and already knew each other.
 

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We have two females

I am not the expert, so all I can do is tell you what we have done and how we went about it.

Our oldest is almost 10, the other is 3 and a half. We intentionally waited untill our first girl was 5 years plus. She is not shy or nerveous. She dominated the pup. She punished the pup from time to time by not letting her eat, taking toys etc, but not often. The pup always submitted to the older girl untill about six months ago. Now the yonger one is dominant, but only in the play area. Other than that, neither appears to dominate the other, but you get the feeling the younger one has taken over. The transition has been smooth, with neither dog ever going over the line. We nevr let rough play get out of hand, and they both always understood that. They both know the "leave it" command. (Important!)

We have probably been lucky. Both dogs are mentally sound, so it may not be the best example.

The previous post's sound very good to me. May not be what youu want to hear, but they are probably right.

Good luck.
 

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we don't know what this shy, very timid dog does to cope in social situations. Does she slink away and avoid being in a socially complex dynamic. Does she show her distress by reacting with fearful barking , aggressive behaviour.
The problem is the younger dog will learn how to behave from the older dog .
Also , the younger dog who hopefully is stable may take advantage of the older dogs weakness and lord it over her grinding her confidence down even more. Or the older dog may be stressed and cow the young pup creating issues . Either dynamic giving you what you did not intend , did not want , two dogs with problems.

qbchottu said it perfectly.
 

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The new pup will have her own personality and it won't be affected by the current pup.
This is not true. I've seen it happen over and over again. Bring a puppy into a home with a shy/nervous/fearful dog and if the new puppy doesn't get to socialize and experience the world on its own, it adopts the behavior of the older dog.

I have two females. The second is fearful. They got along well from 5 months to 2 years old (the older one is 3 years older) and the older one even mothered the younger until she matured and starting pushing her boundaries. Since I know that my oldest female doesn't like to be tested, their time together is now limited and very closely supervised to prevent issues.

Your oldest is not yet an adult and you haven't fully seen her true personality. It is always a bad a idea to get a new dog "for" the current dog. I think you should wait and work on the relationship between you and the current dog to help her gain more confidence.
 

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OpusX, If you don't have Bella in training, I'd suggest checking out Roni for some help. She's in Edwardsburg, not Elkhart> Elkhart Indiana Dog Trainer - Dog Obedience - Dog Behavior Problems - Pet Training
Agree with Jamie~ on the same gender issue, but genetics usually will trump the behavior influence.
I have a female with weaker nerves and brought in a pup with stable nerves, he was not influenced at all w/ the other dogs temperament.
 

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Echo had terrible hereditary shyness. During his lifetime I introduced puppies/adults into our family because I wanted them ... they were NOT for Echo ... none of them were influential with his behavior... only hundreds of hours of hard work helped Echo overcome his poor temperament problems.

GOOD LUCK!!!
 

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The new pup can absolutely pick up your dogs good or bad behavior. I thank our GSD Chazzy for teaching Apache to be afraid of thunder. Kiya also learned to fear thunder until we got Lakota, when she saw that Lakota didn't hide in the bathroom during a storm she stayed in the livingroom. Apache has a habit of getting all riled up when I say were going out, he barks at Kiya and tries to play. Now Lakota is doing that to him.
You are better off getting a male if you have a female. It can work with 2 females. Kiya & Lakota are bff's she never bonded with Apache like that. They have a love/hate relationship.
 

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Genes will be the main influence on the new pup's personality. Your current dog can only influence the new pup if the new pup has the same tendencies.
I am one of 11 children and we all have our own personalities. Just because an older sibling acted or reacted a certain way did not majorly influence the characteristics of the younger ones. Why should dogs be different?
 

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Monkey see monkey do.
 

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I have 2 female GSD's BUT I got the second when my first was over 4 years old. I would NOT add another pup until I've got my older one practically perfect. So much easier to work with one dog at a time.

Fact is that puppies really learn from the dogs around them. Pups with fearful moms end up fearful themselves.... so I'm thinking you are setting yourself up for 2 dogs with issues rather than just being able to focus and help your current dog.

:)
 

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I should have given more detail.

When I say she is shy I mean around people. As far as other dogs she seems to be fine. She goes to doggie "daycare" weekly and gets along great with other dogs. She just is hesitant to let strangers per her and will bark and bark when someone comes into our yard or comes to the door.

I mainly want her to have a non-human playmate as well as our family to play with.


Sent from Petguide.com Free App
 

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Bella will gain more from watching an older, stable dog. If you want playtime, look for just that, playtime with a dog you know will set that positive example and skip owning a second dog until you have Bella sorted out.

Advice from a rescuer who has had success with this tactic, but also suffering the stresses of taking on more dogs than she could handle at one time. One dog with issues in the home is definitely enough! And I agree with those who say a fresh new pup will take a cue from your older, existing dog.
 

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The devil is in the details.
An unsound dog will not make a sound dog unsound.
A sound dog will not make an unsound dog sound.
 

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Once we had GSD and Scottish collie, and I remember their behaviour very well. We had got them as puppies with the only difference of tree months. My younger sister wanted her own dog, but it happened that it was me who had to experience jealosy of two growing females. Hardly could I call them friends. Both hated competition, Eva wouldn't run if I threw the ball for Berry who run first, I had to hold Berry by her collar in order to let the other dog exercise. Only one of them was running after me into water, while the other one was waiting on the bank. And so with every game. They slept different places, and they ate in different rooms, this time Eva didn't want give way to Berry and tried to eat her mate's meal first and her own after. But it was a different story with them in the street. They exhibited "girlies' cooperation" rather quickly whenever it came to drawing away other dogs.
Finally, we made a terrible mistake: we decided that Eva should have puppies. Berry survived several attacks, was nearly killed before we moved her to our friend for a while. Both, and Berry, and Eva lived long lives, were loved and cared, and we tried our best training them. Of course, I often bethink of happier moments, but let me tell you - there is no garantee you won't repeat my story.
 

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Get a male puppy.

We have 4 females and 2 males. Females not getting along is far more common. We've had a few scraps here and there.

Many experts say you should never leave two female dogs unattended ever - it has nothing to do with training, it is all hormonal and instinct.
 
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