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Quote: I just didn't want to get people thinking that i wasn't doing my homework or that i was totally ignorant to the responsibilities of owning a dog... The boxers are known for there jumping up in peoples arms literally whole body off the ground like here catch this lol
I know I get that, it's why you are on the site. And that's great. And boxer's can be a challenge, I know that.

This is really, for me, almost more of a 'time' issue for a family with young children and their first GSD puppy. Because I believe many of our GSD pups really do need that extra time the first year for socialization OUTSIDE THE HOME, tons of exercise OUTSIDE THE HOME/YARD, and training in dog classes with a great trainer (helps forcing the time and socialization when you signed up for classes).
 

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Quote: These GSD's are somekind of nuts with the having to use their mouths when wanting to play with us. And it's extremely painful for me as an adult
Exactly!!! I've gotten all kinds of little nips and bruises as well as had my lip split by over-excited GSD puppies. I can deal with it and I work with them but I'm 5'8" and dog savvy. It can be really hard on little kids and happens irrespective of the dogs' intelligence except as several of us have said that being more intelligent may make it more likely because high intelligence often goes with high energy.

I've fostered Pits and Boxers and I know what you mean about their feet and tendency to jump all over the place. GSDs have kind of a different style but can be just as problematic in their own way.

I think your best bet is going to be an adult GSD that is good with kids - STILL extremely intelligent but past the alligator stage, or a mellower breed of dog.
 

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they're are no dumb German Shepherds, just dumb owners!!!!!
Originally Posted By: Carter4I ask this because one of my main reasons for wanting a GSD is there intelligence. Thats why i was wondering if my luck in choosing a puppy could it be possible to get a pup that can't comprehend basic commands.
 

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German shepherds are the geniuses of the dog world. A 'dumb' shepherd is still way above average doggy intelligence! As everyone else has pointed out, they can be a LOT of work, especially in the early months and even years.
 

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wtf are you talking about?????
Originally Posted By: Carter4well i said dumb but difficult seems like a more suitable word. I have a 4 year old daughter and a 1 year old son the son is fearless but my daughter hates being scratched so i will have to teach down and no jumping quickly
 

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i find German Shepherds to be push botton when it comes to anything.
Originally Posted By: Cassidys MomGerman shepherds are the geniuses of the dog world. A 'dumb' shepherd is still way above average doggy intelligence! As everyone else has pointed out, they can be a LOT of work, especially in the early months and even years.
 

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As "Mum" to a 16 week old pup, a 7 yr old daughter and a 5 yr old son, I can only agree with what the other people on this board are advising you. I have had Shadow since he was 10 weeks old. In this time, we've had torn jeans as he latched on the the knee, 3 torn skirts from my daughter that he grabbed while walking, and my son has had quite a few good nips. (none broke skin, but left a few colorful bruises). As well as my hands are full of little puppy nibbles, as are my husbands. None of this was Shadow being aggressive, but was Shadow being a puppy. A lot of work and time has been spent with Shadow, and my children, teaching that they are above him in the order of things. He doesn't jump up as much anymore, and the kids both carry nylobones to distract him with when he mouths. Both children now participate in our home training sessions, and things are gradually improving.

I would NEVER consider getting a pup while I had a 1yr old. All it takes is the pup being playful, and your back being turned for a split second. You can't be everywhere at once, and the potential is there for someone, either your children or your pup to be hurt, all this not taking into account the amount of time required for training and socialization.

I know you said you've had other breeds before from pups and know what you're getting into. But I have to ask if you had these pups at the same time as a baby.

Please consider adopting an older dog, and wait for the pup until your children are a bit older.

Just my 2 cents.
 

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Originally Posted By: Cassidys MomGerman shepherds are the geniuses of the dog world. A 'dumb' shepherd is still way above average doggy intelligence! As everyone else has pointed out, they can be a LOT of work, especially in the early months and even years.
i've never found it to be a lot of work raising a GSD. they are so easy to train. i call it push botton training. my training method is short sessions 4 or 5 times a day and one thing at a time. i just don't find it hard and nor have i had a dog that was hard to train.
 

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Mine, now big, protective, well-triained and intelligent.

Of course a few issues along the way, but my GSD was the best dog I have ever had, even as a pup. I will add because I am retired I was able to spend a lot of time with the dog.
 

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Quote:I would NEVER consider getting a pup while I had a 1yr old. All it takes is the pup being playful, and your back being turned for a split second. You can't be everywhere at once, and the potential is there for someone, either your children or your pup to be hurt, all this not taking into account the amount of time required for training and socialization.
Well said Shadow Mum
 

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No, I've never met a dumb GSD. Just lots of uninformed people that get them and don't realize how challenging the breed can be (in part because they are so darned SMART). You have to get smart too and spend a good deal of time with them to exercise and train them properly. They are not an easy breed but there's no other dog I'd rather have.
 

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I think you may be confusing intelligence with the character of a German Shepherd. They do not see the sense of doing silly things to please an owner. They think about what you are asking them to do, then decide whether it's something necessary for them to do. Think of yourself as their herd. They will herd you and others. They will protect their 'herd'. They will sit at the door waiting to be sure no predators are coming. They will wait for you to do your part of the relationship they have with you. For example, mine wait patiently while I get their dinner watching every move I make. They will 'help' you - for example, mine bring me my shoes so we can go out. I've had dumb dogs (a lab that was dumb as a bag of hammers) but there is a difference between a dog that will not pick up a toy on command because he has no clue what a toy is or what to do with it and a dog that chooses not to play with you because it serves no purpose to him.

I agree - a young adult shelter dog might be best for you. People turn them in because they have grown out of being a cute, cuddly puppy, or gotten too big for their home, too rough with their children, they are inept at training, etc. At least you know what you are getting. Housebreaking is usually either already done, or easy to teach. We have Baby Huey - he's not rough or destructive, just big and clumsy. At 90 lbs the shelter thought he was 2 years old but they were wrong. All puppies are mouthy, it's how they explore their world. With correction and distraction it goes away. Children need to be taught to respect the dog and NEVER tease them. The dog is their best friend, not something to abuse. If you allow your children to abuse a dog that is your fault, not the dog.

You are wise to learn the characteristics of a breed before getting one. I wish more people would.
 

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I have a extra stubborn one. Repeat commands, nope, just did that. Want me to do it again? K, but the pay has changed. Puppy push ups turned into some sort of burpee hybrid as we mixed together a set of 5 or 6 commands. Did it wrong in agility, better go do something else before going back to it. Luckily she wasn't that picky at trials.

I thought all gsds were like this but they aren't. Kaya my 4 month old puppy is happy to repeat. Don't expect her to fetch. Nether of my shepherds like fetch. They only kind of like tug. She does have the whole mouthy thing going on. I thought her how to be mouthy with me and then how to turned it off. When it's off she goes lick crazy. It's very as she really wants to nip. I can just see her having to mental adjust herself. It's going to get easier for her.
 

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I ask this because one of my main reasons for wanting a GSD is there intelligence. Thats why i was wondering if my luck in choosing a puppy could it be possible to get a pup that can't comprehend basic commands.
Lol, this is such a funny but real topic.
 
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