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Dr Schultz says that Parvo and distemper have lifelong immunity though (the AVMA has published a journal saying something like 95% and 97% of dogs have immunity for 7+ years, which was the end of the challenge study, not that after 7 years they lose immunity), would you booster them anyway?

He also mentioned that in rare cases the dog does not respond to certain vaccines, but that if it didn't respond the first time, it's unlikely to respond to later vaccinations (for the same virus).

So my question is, are titers necessary? I guess what I'm concerned with is that they don't measure cell mediated immunity, so a negative titer doesn't mean your dog has no immunity. What do you do if your dog's titer is negative, if it doesn't necessarily mean your dog isn't protected?

This is where I'm confused.

Also, when and how often do you titer? I heard there are different titer tests, some more effective than others?

If your dog shows a positive titer test, is it really necessary to booster them again, even if at a later date, the titer is negative? Would they not have the cell mediated immunity? All a negative titer means is the body isn't actively fighting the virus, because it has told itself that the threat has been neutralized, not that it can't respond if challenged again.
We saw our Holistic Vet today and I asked about the "positive/negative" titer response for you.
Answer: When taking titers, ask your vet to do IFA testing at Antech Labs or through Dr. Dodds. This test will give a "YES or NO" reading.

Here is Dr. Dodds form for this: http://www.itsfortheanimals.com/Adobe/TEST_REQ_FORMandINSTRUCTIONS-2-12.pdf

Personally, our dogs are titered every 12 to 16 months for Parvo and Distemper. We probably check it more often than most because our dogs only had One Parvo and One Distempter vaccination (Holistic vet in agreement of this) when they were around 16 weeks old. They are now 5 & 7 years old and even after only one vacc of each, they are still FULLY covered. Proves Schultz and Dodds research! ;)

BUT, like people, all dogs systems process things at different rates, so titers are important. For example, our female holds the Rabies antibodies so long, and her numbers are so extremely high, that our vet has had us give her homeopathic remedies a few times to combat the effects of it on her system.

Here is another video interviewing Dr. Dodds on Titers: What Exactly Are Antibody Titers? | Types of Titer Tests

Hope this helps!
Moms:)
 

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It kind of helps, but do you get what I'm saying if I say that a negative titer does not mean your dog does not have immunity? It in all likelihood still has the memory cells to fight the virus (and I think this is the true immunity), so then do you revaccinate if they showed a positive titer previously, but is now negative?

If they had a response before, is there any reason to think they no longer have immunity just because the titer was negative?
 

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I do the required by law rabies. I cross the US/CDN border with my dogs frequently and you need it to enter the U.S.. I also have a large amount of cattle on my property. Sometimes the dogs get into cow manure. So I also do at least once the leptospirosis vaccine. If I had no cattle wouldn't do it, but with them, its a must.
 

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Bear has been vaccinated for almost everything. I live in small-ish town with alot of people who like to recycle dogs and not take proper care of them.. Thats obviously everywhere.. But Belleville is a special kind of breeding ground for dirtbags (look it up). I have a moderately sized yard, but I still enjoy walking him and taking him on adventures so it is necessary I vaccinate him. Would rather pay for shots then the thousands to treat parvo, still with a high risk of death.
 

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I vaccinate for pretty much everything. I wasn't originally going to do that, but when I really weighed the risk, I decided it was better to just go ahead and vaccinate. Case in point: the Lyme vaccine. Purely optional. We live in the upper Midwest and sometimes venture into wooded areas. I protect my dog with Frontline, but given the prevalence of deer ticks/Lyme in this region of the country, it seemed wise to also have her vaccinated for Lyme even though it doesn't sound like a super effective vaccine and even though we are in the city probably 90% of the time. If it offers some further protection, I'm okay with that.

If she ever has an adverse reaction to a vaccine, I'll work that out with my vet, but so far nothing.
 

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Ruger has been vaccinated for everything.

We also did the Lyme vaccine since we had found 3 ticks on him in a week at one point (our house backs up to the woods).
 

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Thor and Bella get vaccinated for everything and is on Frontine Plus and Heartguard from March thru November each year. I give them a break from the Frontline and Heartguard in Dec, Jan, and Feb as I don't feel they need it in the freezing winter months.
 

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Yes. We're in Virginia. We give both our dogs rabies, Distemper/Parvo Combo, Bordetella, and Lepto vaccines.

I will note that after they get the shots, once a year, they usually are sore, lethargic, and sometimes have diarrhea for a day or two. But then they're back to normal.
 

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Vaccinated with booster every year. Also vaccinated for Rabies, most probably only necessary here in Africa. Will be giving her Bravecto for ticks and fleas when her growth stabilizes.
 

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Yes, we vaccinate.

All three of my parents' fully vaccinated, adult dogs just got parvo, only one had to be hospitalized. The vet said they probably survived because they were previously vaccinated. There must be a particularly bad strain in our area. Asher had a month to go before his shots were out-of-date, but I had them done a little early. Parvo can survive in the environment for AGES...scary stuff.
 

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Yes, we vaccinate. We had a dog die years ago (back in the 70s) of a condition that people now vaccinate dogs for and I don't want to go through that again.
 

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My dogs are rescue dogs so they've all had at least one round of vaccinations, including rabies, but that's it. I don't vaccinate them at all, just titer every couple of years. None of them ever had to be re-vaccinated.

When I get my puppy I'd like to get him/her from a breeder who either vaccinate according to the Dodds protocol, or not at all. "One and done" works for me :)

I've read a lot about adverse reactions (and even death) to the Nobivac-4 leptospirosis vaccine so that's something I'd never get for my dogs.

Maria
 

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Since I am a nurse and used to be a vet tech heck yes I vaccinate. I got wormer and the puppy shots from Tractor Supply. I also mix up my own Ivermectin heart worm preventative to give by mouth now that she is old enough. The only vaccine I did not give was the rabies vaccine, a vet did that as the law requires in this state. I don't think we need any boosters. Puppy shots are enough since puppies are so vulnerable. I also kept her away from other dogs and places they had been until she was fully vaccinated.
 

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Vaccinations are the way to go! If cost is a factor in your vaccination decision, I guess it would be best to only get the most prevalent vaccinations. I always get rabies vaccination because my house next to a lot of open land so we do get a few critters around the yard (my dog has been skunked before) but if you live in a big city I see why you would't need it. I have never heard of vaccines giving your dog the disease they vaccinate for, so for that reason I say its better safe than sorry.
 

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I vaccinate puppies and adults according to my veterinarian's advice based on the puppy's health. If the puppy/adult has any sort of immune condition or is prone to illness we do not vaccinate according to regular schedule (I do the same for my cats as I adopt/foster FHV+ cats). I only do 3 year Rabies vaccinations for all ages of dogs (actually most vets in my state only do 3 year Rabies vaccs except for shot clinics). After my dogs reach a certain age (generally what would be considered senior) my vet and I only do titers for vaccinations, including for Rabies, or skip certain vaccinations altogether. We also only vaccinate for what is required for our particular area, which means no Lepto vaccines as that is not a disease prevalent in our area. We only do Bordetella vaccines for puppies and young adults and/or if we are boarding, doing daycare, or for our Search & Rescue dogs or any dogs that may be around other dogs with an unknown history of vaccination or health.
 

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I did all the puppy first year shots, but now I titer test yearly and the results always come back good and no booster is needed. If your vaccinating yearly you should maybe get another opinion on that... vets like any other business is a business and spraying/neutering and vaccines make up a massive part of their business, yet there's been some interesting development about what neutering does to a dog if done early and that we over vaccinate our dogs.
 

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Yes, unless there are serious risks involved. We were told the heartworm injections could have adverse affects, and it lasts for a year so it could make ger very sick if her body didn't like it. So we went for the pill option instead, once a month, but we might go for the injection starting next year since she hasn't reacted badly to the medication.
 
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