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Some people seem to think other people and trainers know more about their dogs. Seems odd because you live with your dog you learn from each other. Not like the trainer is physic and knows everything even trainers can be wrong. They may know more what works best but not know as much as the owner. I know that my dog is a fanatic at swimming can go for hours. At times loves to bark when it is a fun happy time. Don't let him bark when frustrated anxious scared or nervous. He has his own indivdual that a stranger doesn't know about that.
 

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If you're knowledgable about dogs and able to look objectively then of course you'll know more
 

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I think it depends. I can tell you my dogs personalities and quirks inside and out. As far as why my dogs do certain things or act a certain way I can most of the time but a trainer can tell me how to fix it and more in depth why they do or act a certain way.
However, some people think their dogs do things and they have no clue on dog behavior and have it all wrong.
Ex: fido barks at everyone and raises hackles. Owner things dog is just being protective. Trainer and others with dog knowledge know fido is fearful.
Not everyone is keen on dog behavior.
I have learned a ton, but I'm no expert.
Just because you live with a dog doesn't mean you automatically understand dog behaviors. You have to study and learn what the behavior is and why the dog thinks the way it does to commit that behavior.
Some people who have dog knowledge can tell a dogs behavior or why they act a certain way and have never met the dog previously.
It's all about the right kind of knowledge
 

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You'd be surprised at how many people think they know their dog and think they know how to read doggy body language but do not. They mistake submission for dominance, calming signals for a challenge, fear aggression for protectiveness.

You'd be surprised at how many people have inadvertently trained their dogs for certain behaviours, and then blame the dog for being 'bad', when it was their own actions that caused the behaviour. It often takes an outside person looking in, like a trainer, to be able to see the dynamics between owner and dog and be able to shed light into the situation.
 

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Of course, I know more about my dogs than a trainer does. But that doesn't mean a trainer might not know better why a problem exists and how to best manage the problem.

A good trainer can look objectively on how you handle your dog. They can see body language that the dog is reacting to that we may not be aware of ourselves. And they are caught up in loving the dog, so they aren't trying to see everything in a light that makes ourselves or our dog look better.

A good trainer has to diagnose the problem between dog and handler and then they have to lay out a course of action that will address the problem that will work for both parties.

In a group class of people teaching a variety of commands, the trainer has to demonstrate how to get the dog to do each command, and watch the handlers fumble through it. Then they have to adjust the techniques to fit the handlers, and help the handlers get it right. The focus is on the handler, for the handler trains the dog, the handler lives with the dog, the handler knows the dog. And much of the time, any problems reside with the handler moreso than the dog.

Someone on their 1st pup might be wise to accept the trainer knows more than they do, and if they trust the trainer, to do what the trainer says within reason. Someone on their 4th dog might have a better knowledge base, and may realize that an approach that most dogs will respond favorably to, may be over-kill for their dog, and may even make things more difficult. Experience with a variety of dogs, or sufficient history with the dog in question is the only way to get there.
 

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I think in many situations the rose coloured glasses come out to play for most owners, having an outsider's POV who is trained and spent years studying is never a bad thing to have. I'd be foolish to completely throw it all away thinking I knew better, use what works and ignore what doesn't. Constructive criticism can be a great tool

Good trainers have multiple tools in their belts and will work with you to achieve the goals you have
 

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I had to think about this and I finally have the most truthful answer I can give. As a responsible pet owner I freely admit that I don't really know Gunther at all. I know his behavior. I know he hides from the garbage truck, or anything he perceives as the garbage truck. I know he eats a lot of things that are very bad for him, even while still suffering from the very thing making him sick. I know he likes to jump up for hugs, will groan if we hug him (but almost like we expect it from him so he does it to humor us). I know that when my husband comes home up until I leave for work he's his preferred human. But as much as I know about what Gunther does, I have no idea why. We always tend to say "Because he's Gunther".

Raising a GSD dog is new to both of us. I do look to others for their input but I always take everything with a grain of salt too. Some of the criticism I ignore, some I respond to. But no matter what my attitude seems like I am always gathering information from others on here and in my social life and learning.
 

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You'd be surprised at how many people think they know their dog and think they know how to read doggy body language but do not. They mistake submission for dominance, calming signals for a challenge, fear aggression for protectiveness.

You'd be surprised at how many people have inadvertently trained their dogs for certain behaviours, and then blame the dog for being 'bad', when it was their own actions that caused the behaviour. It often takes an outside person looking in, like a trainer, to be able to see the dynamics between owner and dog and be able to shed light into the situation.
This.

I see it in classes all the time.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
I think it depends. I can tell you my dogs personalities and quirks inside and out. As far as why my dogs do certain things or act a certain way I can most of the time but a trainer can tell me how to fix it and more in depth why they do or act a certain way.
However, some people think their dogs do things and they have no clue on dog behavior and have it all wrong.
Ex: fido barks at everyone and raises hackles. Owner things dog is just being protective. Trainer and others with dog knowledge know fido is fearful.
Not everyone is keen on dog behavior.
I have learned a ton, but I'm no expert.
Just because you live with a dog doesn't mean you automatically understand dog behaviors. You have to study and learn what the behavior is and why the dog thinks the way it does to commit that behavior.
Some people who have dog knowledge can tell a dogs behavior or why they act a certain way and have never met the dog previously.
It's all about the right kind of knowledge
I do get offended when people or trainer and they are strangers. thinking they know more about my dog or dog friends more than me.
 

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Just because they are strangers doesn't mean they don't know dog behavior. Everyone at one point in time is a stranger to you. Just because they don't know your dog, doesn't mean they can't wait the dog interact and understand if they have the right knowledge about dog behavior.
Yes, some people act like they know everything and don't. But that doesn't apply to everyone.
As I mentioned earlier: it's all about the right kind of knowledge.
 

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Opening up to the idea that some people have excellent skills at reading dogs, maybe better than you, can help you to become a better trainer/handler but only if you are open to it.

I have sure learned some things about my own dog that way.
 

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Opening up to the idea that some people have excellent skills at reading dogs, maybe better than you, can help you to become a better trainer/handler but only if you are open to it.

I have sure learned some things about my own dog that way.
Couldn't have said this better.

When I stopped thinking that I was better than everyone else, I started learning a TON.
 

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The quality of your participation and the depth of your consideration is the opening door to knowing your dog better than anyone. I am still learning.
 

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I do get offended when people or trainer and they are strangers. thinking they know more about my dog or dog friends more than me.
You just aren't going to get a lot of support for this kind of thinking. At your age, not a lot of people are going to buy that you know more about what you are working with a trainer for than the trainer. But if you persevere, and what I mean, is actually listen to these people and learn what they are teaching, try what they are suggesting, and accept that you do not know everything about everything, then you will probably know more at some point than your trainers about individual dogs, and you may even know more about dog training.

I have been there. I have trainers that know more than me. And I have been to trainers that I know more than they do, not just about the dog in front of me, but about training in general.

There are no shortcuts. You cannot read about it on the internet and know more about it than an instructor. And if you have that attitude, you cannot conceal it, and it will make it very unpleasant for people to work with you. Some may not want to even bother with you.

You really can't go from getting bit by someone's dog in a show to knowing all there is to know in a few months. Doesn't happen. It takes lots of dogs and lots of people and TIME and work. It also takes a bit of humble acceptance that you need help or that you do not know as much as the other person.
 

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Some people seem to think other people and trainers know more about their dogs. Seems odd because you live with your dog you learn from each other. Not like the trainer is physic and knows everything even trainers can be wrong. They may know more what works best but not know as much as the owner. I know that my dog is a fanatic at swimming can go for hours. At times loves to bark when it is a fun happy time. Don't let him bark when frustrated anxious scared or nervous. He has his own indivdual that a stranger doesn't know about that.
I'd say that I know my dog's mannerisms and what he likes more than anyone else, but that's about it.
 

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didn't read all the posts so I may be parroting what others have said, but in my brief experience so far with German shepherds the amount of directly conflicting advice between trainer, breeder and vet is astounding
 

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Discussion Starter #17
Couldn't have said this better.

When I stopped thinking that I was better than everyone else, I started learning a TON.
I talk to people out there about new ideas though. There are people that have been learning from my ideas. Unfortunately don't give it much though because of their narrow and closed minds. Also those are the kinds of people who seem to think they are always right and never wrong everyone agrees with them. If have a view of different ideas people jump to first impression s. Its a nightmare to deal with!
 

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Discussion Starter #18
You just aren't going to get a lot of support for this kind of thinking. At your age, not a lot of people are going to buy that you know more about what you are working with a trainer for than the trainer. But if you persevere, and what I mean, is actually listen to these people and learn what they are teaching, try what they are suggesting, and accept that you do not know everything about everything, then you will probably know more at some point than your trainers about individual dogs, and you may even know more about dog training.

I have been there. I have trainers that know more than me. And I have been to trainers that I know more than they do, not just about the dog in front of me, but about training in general.

There are no shortcuts. You cannot read about it on the internet and know more about it than an instructor. And if you have that attitude, you cannot conceal it, and it will make it very unpleasant for people to work with you. Some may not want to even bother with you.

You really can't go from getting bit by someone's dog in a show to knowing all there is to know in a few months. Doesn't happen. It takes lots of dogs and lots of people and TIME and work. It also takes a bit of humble acceptance that you need help or that you do not know as much as the other person.
I already know that. Unfortunately everyone are not open to new ideas about some things. Example, not believing I hike other peoples dogs. Go search them on my albums
 

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You just aren't going to get a lot of support for this kind of thinking. At your age, not a lot of people are going to buy that you know more about what you are working with a trainer for than the trainer. But if you persevere, and what I mean, is actually listen to these people and learn what they are teaching, try what they are suggesting, and accept that you do not know everything about everything, then you will probably know more at some point than your trainers about individual dogs, and you may even know more about dog training.

I have been there. I have trainers that know more than me. And I have been to trainers that I know more than they do, not just about the dog in front of me, but about training in general.

There are no shortcuts. You cannot read about it on the internet and know more about it than an instructor. And if you have that attitude, you cannot conceal it, and it will make it very unpleasant for people to work with you. Some may not want to even bother with you.

You really can't go from getting bit by someone's dog in a show to knowing all there is to know in a few months. Doesn't happen. It takes lots of dogs and lots of people and TIME and work. It also takes a bit of humble acceptance that you need help or that you do not know as much as the other person.

I second selzer.!!!


Sent from KenzoPad
 
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