German Shepherds Forum banner

1 - 20 of 20 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
32 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Just wondered apart from the obvious physical differences between them if there were any differences in the temperaments between the girls and the boys? We pick our baby girl up in around 5 weeks time and i have only looked after a female GSD before so havent been around a male much, in a few years time i would love a male sable so im just wondering if there are any differences. I know it mostly comes down to the temperament of the individual dog but just thought certain things may keep cropping up in your experiences.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
451 Posts
Well I know males take longer to mature. They're also, according to my trainer, harder to train due to this fact. Blake is 1 year and a month and is still a puppy, acting like a clown whenever he gets the chance. Then you take his sister...she is way more mature.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
312 Posts
Male/female dogs are pretty much like male/female people.

Males tend to be less mature and more playful, but generally get along with members of both sexes.

Females tend to be more mature and less goofy, but rarely get along in large numbers of females (of course there are exceptions, but I'm fairly certain this is the general consensus around here).
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11,280 Posts
males are goofier but it doesn't take longer to train them
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
15,138 Posts
What everyone has posted is generalizations. There are always a certain amount of dogs that will fall into the generalization and those that will fall outside.

As a generalization I think the easy going middle of the road males make a good choice for a first time GSD owner. That doesn't mean that every male pup in the litter is a good choice.

It is important that you work with a good breeder in getting a pup that will be a good match for you. The best match in the litter maybe a male or a female. I believe that genetics play an important role, say that a female line produces high drive female pups and the male produces a lot of very calm, lower drives males, then IMHO the middle of the road male is a good choice. If you reversed the traits on the dam and sire then I would change to a female.

So finding a good breeder that knows their lines and what they produce is a good start at getting a pup that will fit.

Val
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
137 Posts
I wrote in another thread that we got our GSD, Samantha, after Mr Pip's daughter got Samantha's brother from a breeder.

Jack...Samantha's brother...was a sweet boy. He was so mellow. In fact, he was probably less bossy than his sister was.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
451 Posts
Originally Posted By: Wisc.TigerAs a generalization I think the easy going middle of the road males make a good choice for a first time GSD owner. That doesn't mean that every male pup in the litter is a good choice.
To prove your point about generalizations...I was told to never get a male GSD as my first GSD. Even now if I tell people our first GSD is a male they say we're crazy and if it wasn't for our dog knowledge in general we would be in trouble.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
15,138 Posts
So how is you male working out for you as your first GSD?

I still think al lot of it has to do with the bloodlines and the genetics of the pups. I currently have 1 male and three females and none of the females are at all like the other.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
451 Posts
Originally Posted By: Wisc.TigerSo how is you male working out for you as your first GSD?
He's wonderful. I can see how his sister would be better for some as she is quiet and relaxed. But that is just her and not to say another GSD female would be the same.

I think a lot of it depends on the household too. If you work your dog's drive from day one and play with him constantly he is going to be more 'hyper' and look for more stimulation. If you leave them to entertain themselves their drive won't 'grow' as much. Just my opinion. Take his sister for example...she has way more drive than he has but wasn't stimulated as much as he was...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,389 Posts
My female, and the few others I've known well, tend to be very nurturing, even after being spayed young. Also, very moody.

My boys are just happy, happy. What ever you want, they will do. My girl might grumble a little when I ask her to get out of the bed.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,483 Posts
My experience - in general - is that the boys are sweet and loveable, eager to please, but often goofy. The girls are more likely to be serious and intense, sometimes a little more inclined to second guess the handler, but more type A. I prefer females but agree with the other posters that males often make the best dog for a first time GSD owner.

But these are wide generalizations. I agree with Val that the best pup is the one hand picked for each situation by a knowledgable breeder (or foster home).
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12,829 Posts
I don't think males are harder to train - maybe some people think this because it's been my experience that males are goofier and get a kick out of being naughty. Females are more loyal and don't want to annoy the master (or mistress) - except when they're really young they get into stuff more than the males. Maybe becuase they're smarter and think up more ways to cause trouble.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
56 Posts
Both my male GSD's have been easy to train. The male we have now is almost 2 years and very much a goofball but he is very focused when we work with him. Our female we had I felt was a bit harder to train - she was more stubborn but they are all diffrent. I love them all!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
215 Posts
I would agree that a lot depends on the breeding and bloodlines. I've had 3 male GSD's and one female. Of the 3 males, one was VERY serious. He matured quickly and took on his watchdog role with vigor. He was "big brother" - ALWAYS watching. The other two males (including my little Rocky) are/were goofy and VERY sweet natured. All they want is ball, ball, BALL. Rocky started getting a bit of a stubborn streak at about 6 months, but it helped when I realized he was no longer food motivated. He'll do just about anything for a ball. I haven't noticed any naughty teenager traits yet either - he hasn't given me any back talk or tried to test my dominance.

Shelby was every bit the goofball when she was younger, but that was also when we had an adult male running the show. Now, she's all business. Sometimes she'll get in a playful mood and run around carrying one of her stuffed toys, but that's about it. She's become quite a serious GSD in her maturity.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
143 Posts
My limited experience has held true to the generalizations. Bosco was very slow to mature... I was finally able to leave him loose in the house around age 2.5. He did have a horrible adolescent teenage brat phase around 10-11 months, but he was easy to train and once he got past the brat phase, he was a very easy going dog, while still being fun loving and goofy. Great first GSD.


Kira... She's got attitude. Now I can't leave her loose in the house, as I don't think she'll ever get to the point of not chewing on things (she's 7!), but she's got a ton of drive and never settles down. She's probably a little harder to train than Bosco just because she can't settle. For example, doing a down stay? HA!

We've only had Dax for a couple weeks, and I haven't even started obedience training him yet. So far, I don't think it will be easy because he has very little drive. I'm used to dogs that go nuts over a tennis ball. This guy is completely different. He is very sweet and easy going though. He's definitely a male. Goofy, but sweet.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
32 Posts
Discussion Starter #17
Thanks for everyones expeiences. Weve already chosen our new baby anyway i was just wondering really. I knew someone who had a female GSD and she said she would never have a female again because she was aggressive to men and would literally whine all day and was her shadow.....but i think mostly it was down to her training of the dog. Personally i cant wait to have myself a doggy shadow!!!!!
We picked Elliott because she looked big and strong and when i held her she settled very quickly in my arms- apparently only two of her pups have done this when they were being chosen. Its funny because when my OH holds her she wriggles and screams!!!!! As soon as i have her back in my arms she sighs and settles again!!!!!! Think shes going to be my dog already (secretly pleased!!!)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
262 Posts
So much variation just like us! Dasher is my 2 yo male intact. He is very sweet natured, goofy goofy goofy, social, eager to please, protective, territorial. His ease of training has made the latter traits quite manageable and I have no worries about taking him anywhere. I am not saying he is like a lab, but I ave been very into preventing issues before they become issues and he is so willing to please that he has become very trustworthy in public setting and home.But being a male, he is alot of dog to handle and not for someone who is expecting a lab. He needs to be told what to do and he will do it.

My female Sasha is about 18 months and very different. She is VERY sweet to people and loves kids. I am amazed at how gentle she is with my 4 yo daughter. She is smart too, but seems more like she tries to figure out why you are wanting her to do something. Unlike Dash, who just does it. She is more concerned with her rank and reminds me of a high school girl who wants to be popular. She seems more high maintenace and needy somtimes, but nothing "crate" or "quiet" won't fix!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
143 Posts
Originally Posted By: ElliottI knew someone who had a female GSD and she said she would never have a female again because she was aggressive to men and would literally whine all day and was her shadow.....but i think mostly it was down to her training of the dog.
Kira used to nip men when I first got her (she was a rescue with unknown background), but I took her through a "manners" class that focused mostly on CGC type stuff, and one thing we worked on was to specifically get her liking men. By the end of the 7 week course, she thought all men had treats in their pockets!
And to this day, she's still great with men, women, children alike. It's hard to believe she ever used to nip men! I think if you're starting out with a puppy and you are socializing her to men, she'll be just fine with men.

And males can certainly be shadows. I've had male dogs all my life (Kira is my first female), and I haven't been able to go to the bathroom by myself most of my life, including childhood! All of my male dogs have wanted to be at least in the same room with me, if not laying down at my feet. My new male Dax is attached at the hip, and Bosco always was too. I think they're more shadowy than Kira, actually. Of course, I only have experience with one female... I've had 3 non-GSD males and 2 GSD males (well, Dax is a mix, but he's mostly GSD looking).
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12,829 Posts
My female doesn't care for men either - now that's she's 8, there's certain men she likes but it's a short list. It was pretty funny last week, one of my friends was over and he was scritching her neck. Then she laid down on the floor and looked at him like 'Eww, I was touched by a man and I liked it. I'm so confused!'
 
1 - 20 of 20 Posts
Top