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This morning I got the results from the genome testing and Memphis is strongly believed to have DM. He is 8 years 5 months old, has been knuckling a little, dragging his rear feet, and shows some weakness in the hind legs.

My vet and our local canine neurologist are reaching out to Texas A&M Vet School to see if there are any treatments available to slow or halt this disease but I am reaching out here to see if yall have information I can use to help my guy. I will do whatever it takes, and I am located in Houston Texas. I reached out to Dr. Coates with the University of Missouri, as well as Dr. Kaspar at Ohio State University who appear to be leaders in this field for DM in Canines.

Any help is much appreciated.
 

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One thing I would strongly consider is to get him a cart and have him get used to it now while he still has good mobility. I haven't faced this particular issue with my dogs but I know that if you would use a cart later, starting earlier works better.
 

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Recently lost my 16 yr. old to DM. Vet was unable to diagnose it initially and we just assumed lameness of unknown origin even though it was all in the hind end. Eventually I knew from reading and the symptoms were pretty obvious.

Initially I requested she be give a shot of Adequan, having used it for horse joint problems. Surprisingly it gave a
very positive improvement for a few weeks but a follow up shot did nothing. I tried various joint supplements and the
best by far was Glycoflex 3 but eventually it also stops working because the source of the problem is neurological
and not orthopedic problems with joints or bones.

DM causes paralysis starting with hind end and moves forward towards head over time. Eventually the front legs
are affected as well as major organs. When major organs are affected the dog begins the decline to death.

How long it takes to affect organs is anyone's guess. My girl's problems started 3 yrs ago, very slight but the clues were
there. Lots of extra vitamins and minerals and pain meds helped her last as long as she did.

Literature says there's nothing to be done to stop DM. It will progress and debilitate the dog.

I'm so sorry you are facing this. My son has 2 dogs that appear to have it now. My suggestion to him is that once
they become incontinent, it's time to gently PTS.
 

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There are dietary protocols that have proven effective at stalling progress, but I want to be clear on this. DM is progressive and there is no cure. An MRI to rule out potential spinal injuries or issues should be the first step. There are multiple things that can mimic symptoms of DM which are in fact treatable. The test only proves your dog is at risk.
Swimming seems to be helpful but again will not stop progress.
When Sabi was diagnosed I was told 6-12 months, she lasted two years. I hear more and more stories about dogs lasting years not months so it would seem diet is key to stalling progress.
The kindest thing the vet did for me was not sell me false hope. In fact she declined to discuss any options the day she gave me the results. She met with me a few days later and from the beginning stayed brutally clear that this disease was terminal. She refused to let me wander down the what if and maybe roads. We discussed diet, exercise and massage.
@carmspack has some awesome dietary knowledge, hopefully she will chime in. For Sabi massage/manipulation worked well and probably maintained the muscle in her back legs longer then otherwise, and she loved to swim.


I am sorry you are dealing with this.
 

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My name sake here "Shane" was diagnosed with DM approx. 15 years ago....he did really well in a cart for close to a year and a half...he passed while on the operating table for bloat and his stomach had twisted....we were fortunate with him and his cart because he was a natural born prankster and thief who took great pleasure since a pup in doing anything that got a laugh OR stealing anything that belonged to my wife or myself then teasing us by running back and forth in front of us hoping we'd give chase and try to catch him....he enjoyed chasing a ball but he LOVED chasing his food bowl-this continued even after he had a cart...as long as he thought we were watching him and entertained he was happy.


I tell a bit of his story because I feel it was his desire to chase bowl-ball and make us laugh that helped him take to the cart...I literally put him in it first time he stood there looking sorta puzzled....I clicked his leash on him and got him walking.... and it took him no time for him to realize he could chase his food bowl or ball while in the cart....he could entertain his self by pushing his upside down bowl around the yard like a hockey puck.....he enjoyed eating while in the cart....he could pee or poop while in the cart---it's really going to depend on the dog as far as how they do in a cart.....some take to them quickly some do not.



As humans when we see a wheel chair we think..."handicapped"---"disabled" or "can't do"...but dogs live in the moment and for Shane the cart was simply a way for him to once again chase a ball or bowl and make his "people" laugh...some of my fondest memories of Shane and his antics are things he'd do while in that cart....DM is a horrible horrible disease-and when we heard the diagnosis I felt like I'd been kicked in the gut.....I thought "End Game"....but lucky for us Shane couldn't spell "End Game".....DM really never slowed him up much except when he was indoors and out of his cart.


My heart really goes out to you-your family and to Memphis.....you and Memphis are in my thoughts and prayers because I remember all to well my initial feelings....again GOOD LUCK! to you and Memphis and BTW kudos to your vet and the neurologist for contacting Texas A&M--good on them.
 

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i believe i have the same situation. its weird because he still has feelings in his feet and responds to my touch and if i pinch his toes he will kick. his dna shows 2 copies for the dm but there is no way of confirming if he has it. i have read on the net some research where cells were taken from a dogs nose and introduced where the affected nerves was on the dogs back and that regenerated the nerves on the dogs back and allowed the dog to walk again. im curious, what did dr coates and dr kaspar say?
 

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Yesterday my GSD Sheba was diagnosed with DM she is 4 years old. We are devastated. We do not know mucn about it. Sheba could not get up on the bed and then it was the couch and chairs and now she rarely jumps up on us. We do not know what to expect in the coming months.
 

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Yesterday my GSD Sheba was diagnosed with DM she is 4 years old. We are devastated. We do not know mucn about it. Sheba could not get up on the bed and then it was the couch and chairs and now she rarely jumps up on us. We do not know what to expect in the coming months.
You should start your own thread but at 4 years old I find that highly suspect. Those symptoms don't sound right either.
 

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At 4, have you xrayed the entire spine and done a work up to rule out other possibilities that mimic DM (but are much more manageable/treatable)?
 
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