German Shepherds Forum banner

1 - 11 of 11 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
262 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Hi All,

I am mentally preparing for my 4 mth old females spay, the vet wants to wait till she is 6 months and more mature. Her and her mate are extremely bonded and will not tolerate being separated. I worry about bringing her home after surgery and them not being able to be together or worse, them doing whatever they have to, to get to each other, even if that causes her harm. We plan to stay with her a few days after surgery but they are usually outside all day and sleep together. We will be keeping her with us the 1st few nights but during the day she will be in the garage. (Both dogs are very curious and can not be left alone in the house.. they will chew everything:surprise:)

Any suggestions to prep both dogs for the separation or how to handle it once she is home?? 10 - 12 days seems like a very long time for them both to have to be apart.
Thank you!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
32,553 Posts
Yes. Start working with them separately now. Bonded pairs can be a nightmare. Walk separately, play separately, create the bond with you, not each other.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10,913 Posts
If these were my dogs, I would have them go through one heat for health reasons. Immediately (NOW!) start working on getting them used to live without each other by hiring a trainer who knows this breed. I hope by the time they go into heat they can be boarded separately to avoid hormonal conflicts.
They are pups right now and crave each other's company but that can change when they get older. Start working on separating them now; a few moments then minutes, then hours etc. Take your time as this needs to be a gradual process. A few examples: separate crates, crate time, play and train time, walks etc. If you walk them together, have someone else take one.
Also read up on sibling issues.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
262 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
Thank you all for the suggestions. We got a male and a female because we wanted them to have partners, they are not litter mates FYI. We do not want them living separately long term, just to get through the spay process. We are not keen on crating but had no reason to. They are both very bonded to our family so I am not worried about them choosing each other, over us. We have considered getting through the 1st heat cycle before spaying but that would be an even longer period with them separated and we do not want puppies. I think before the procedure we will work on them having time apart so its not such a huge blow when she comes back and he cant be near her. Walking separately, 1 indoors while the other is outside and so on... maybe keep her in the place we plan on her being for a while each day so again its not such a huge change.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
863 Posts
You mentioned, "both dogs are very curious and can not be left alone in the house.. they will chew everything." But then you also said, "we are not keen on crating." While I can respect your reluctance to not use one, I think you can solve a lot of your problems right there if you learn to appreciate the crate. (I just talked last night on another posting about the benefits of using a crate so I won't bother writing the same thing again.) My dog loves his crate and he goes in there for naps every day. It's like his own private sanctuary where he can hide and rest. It's not jail, or prison, or etc. The crate is a good thing. I only close him in the crate when I leave the house because I can't trust him to be left alone in the house. I don't understand the reluctance to use a crate, but oh well, to each their own.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
5,175 Posts
Both of my dogs earned the right to be loose in the house. They started tethered to me and crated when we were not home. I let my dogs make choices but I limit those choices to keep them safe. My dogs are buddies but I do work them separately. They each need to learn to do thing for themselves, be confident by themselves, work without each other. It will be healthier for the entire family. They will still be buddies when the come back together and perhaps even better buddies. They can learn to take turns. You may even find differences in their personalities and each will need to be taught a bit differently, like human siblings are different and respond differently. Trust us. It will be better for you and your dogs if they learn that they have their times together and their times apart. They may complain a bit at first, but be firm. It is worth the work.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
856 Posts
Thank you all for the suggestions. We got a male and a female because we wanted them to have partners, they are not litter mates FYI. We do not want them living separately long term, just to get through the spay process. We are not keen on crating but had no reason to. They are both very bonded to our family so I am not worried about them choosing each other, over us. We have considered getting through the 1st heat cycle before spaying but that would be an even longer period with them separated and we do not want puppies. I think before the procedure we will work on them having time apart so its not such a huge blow when she comes back and he cant be near her. Walking separately, 1 indoors while the other is outside and so on... maybe keep her in the place we plan on her being for a while each day so again its not such a huge change.
Unfortunately the name littermate syndrome is misleading. It can happen with any puppies raised together. Its great for them to have company but you want them bonded more to you than each other otherwise they can have some serious issues in the future. 2 puppies is a lot of work to do it correctly and avoid potential issues in the future. I've seen several posts in my groups where people are having to rehome dogs because of fighting and were puppies raised together. Not all related but most. Your dogs will be happier if they learn to be able to be apart.

Also it may not happen right away. Some dogs are fine up until 5-6+ years old when suddenly fights just start breaking out and get worse.

https://suburban-k9.com/articles/littermate-syndrome/
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
262 Posts
Discussion Starter #10
Thank you again for the help! We started separating them this weekend to get ready for the spay. Each having time alone and time with the family alone. We just don't want to crate them because we want them to have the freedom of going in and out of the house, but only once they are trained. They have there private space outside, we want them to understand the house is a privilege.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10,913 Posts
Thank you again for the help! We started separating them this weekend to get ready for the spay. Each having time alone and time with the family alone. We just don't want to crate them because we want them to have the freedom of going in and out of the house, but only once they are trained. They have there private space outside, we want them to understand the house is a privilege.
How do you keep your home intact with 4-month-old puppies that can move in and out as they wish? What does their private space look outside and are they outside when you have to leave them alone? Sounds like you need luck on your side. I honestly don't know how to prevent problem behavior without ever using a crate. You know they have to spend time crated at the vet's? That can be problematic.
 
1 - 11 of 11 Posts
Top