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Hey everyone I've been looking into getting a Working Line GSD more and more so I'm educating myself on lines, temperaments, training, exercise etc. Though this is a working breed and they require lots of consistent training and exercise throughout their lifetime, what's a day in the life like with your DDR? What do you guys do training wise to get them mentally stimulated so they're satisfied? What about how much exercise you give your DDR to the point where they're content enough to settle and be happy? This dog would be a Service Dog prospect (though it's not the best choice for some people GSD's fit me well I'm just looking into working lines more instead of show), we'd also possibly get into other sports like obedience, rally and many others out there. I have experience working with many breeds but haven't had the pleasure of working with specifically purpose bred working lines. There's only a certain amount of information I can find on the internet with articles so if you could refer me to any that'd be greatly appreciated!
 

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If you go to a breeder that totally understands the DDR lines they are using, or how to cross them with the other lines, you should be able to get what you are looking for. Do avoid breeders that are just using the "black sable DDR dogs" as a selling gimmick.



You won't find them to be anymore in need of exercise and mental stimulation than most dogs bred to work. I have found some of the DDR dogs to not have as strong of pack drive and not be the easiest dogs in obedience. Not all, but some, so, again, pick the right breeder.
 

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Like I said I haven't worked with working line breeds yet and I will of course not get a working line Shepherd or any breed for that matter without working with them hands on. How much exercise and stimulation do you give your Sheps?
 

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I think you will find the working lines to be far more active and require much more attention both as a “hugger” and “good boy” praiser and “let’s do something” from the dog. In other words you need to really work continuously with your dog. Many live in the kennel and get out to work only. Some can do this others can’t. Most dogs you see can’t work all day. I likened it to us when I was playing sports. We shagged balls just because it was moving no matter that we were worn out and tired or hurt. It’s just something driving them.

I have an Aussie that just loves hugs, pets and belly rubs. She will work tirelessly as long as I require, then can totally relax. She has been satisfied. Not quite as big as a GSD but the same working attitude. She is keeping me healthy.

These high drive, mentally stable and nervy dogs are a handful but oh so satisfying when they perform.
 

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My dogs want to work, but even the young ones are pretty good about down time. I have been working awful hours lately and other than being rather bored, they are surviving and no more annoying than usual. Not destructive or noisy or doing anything bad. Mental exercise; like agility, search games, obedience; tires them out quickly so if you don't have time for a lot of physical exercise you can use these types of things instead. They really don't need as much exercise as people want to believe.
 

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Oh okay that's definitely good to know. I have always been told they need hours upon hours to be happy while a couple have said their dogs are okay and content with an hour and half to two hours. I know some could go all day but I always am careful when researching.
 

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If you go to a breeder that totally understands the DDR lines they are using, or how to cross them with the other lines, you should be able to get what you are looking for. Do avoid breeders that are just using the "black sable DDR dogs" as a selling gimmick.



You won't find them to be anymore in need of exercise and mental stimulation than most dogs bred to work. I have found some of the DDR dogs to not have as strong of pack drive and not be the easiest dogs in obedience. Not all, but some, so, again, pick the right breeder.
I bought a pup from Re...Sire was Havoc and Dam was Xiva...pretty sure you know who Havoc belonged to. I was at the trial but didn't talk to you, you looked busy. Pup is HIGH drive but fits in well with other two.
 

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Hey everyone I've been looking into getting a Working Line GSD more and more so I'm educating myself on lines, temperaments, training, exercise etc. Though this is a working breed and they require lots of consistent training and exercise throughout their lifetime, what's a day in the life like with your DDR? What do you guys do training wise to get them mentally stimulated so they're satisfied? What about how much exercise you give your DDR to the point where they're content enough to settle and be happy? This dog would be a Service Dog prospect (though it's not the best choice for some people GSD's fit me well I'm just looking into working lines more instead of show), we'd also possibly get into other sports like obedience, rally and many others out there. I have experience working with many breeds but haven't had the pleasure of working with specifically purpose bred working lines. There's only a certain amount of information I can find on the internet with articles so if you could refer me to any that'd be greatly appreciated!
It is really more about a breeding's pedigree and the traits the dogs close up in the pedigree tend to have and produce. For me, the vast majority of so called DDR dogs are far removed from the earlier, quality DDR dogs. IMO, it is more of a marketing technique and physical appearance is a selling point due to dark pigment and strong bone. But you can find that in various different lines. So you can't just ask what a day in the life of a DDR GSD would be like because all breedings will produce different types of dogs as well as different types of dogs within a breeding. You are better off learning about different traits of the working lines and decide what traits you would like to see in a dog and then get help with breedings that are likely to produce those traits. With rally and something like AKC obedience, you don't need a dog with high prey drive and the so called DDR dogs these days and in the past tend to have lower prey drive, but again, it depends on the breeding.
 

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I had a ddr in the 90’s older lines. Very bulky dog reminded me of bear more then a wolf and extra weight easily crept on. Handsome boy he was. He was one of the easiest dogs in terms of naturally obedient, very calm mellow dog in house, high threshold and low prey drive - he would bark and not get up at the squirrels who fed in the bird feeder in the yard a few feet away- which to me equates with an easier dog in general - low prey drive. He had strong drives though and lived for balls and his Kong and sticks or dead trees. I did not have to keep up with training as he was naturally obedient. We used to have a garbage can out in the kitchen with an easy access lid - he would never touch it never had to tell him not to. My female now is the same way- naturally obedient. He was a extreme serious dog. It took a few years to soften him up and there was a big pup inside. He liked his own space that was big with him. He would just get uncomfortable look on his face and later he developed arthritis so that did not help. Never hyper or anxious I could never live with such a dog. I would think he would of made a great service dog. In general he never acknowledged other dogs or strangers out as if they were non existent unless they threw a stick or ball.
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One of the most endearing qualities of a good German Shepherd is their ability to adjust to the lifestyle of owner or home. DDR dogs really do good in normal home situations. Now German Shepherds that are compelled by excessive drives, or insecure because of weak nerves often have issues with adjusting to family life...but by and large the DDR dogs make good dogs that adjust to most lifestyles.
 
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