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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Im interested in getting a german shepherd this year. I've been doing some research on the types of bloodlines and seem to like the working lines more than the show lines. Right now Im thinking of getting a dog from east german lines or a mix of east/czech. I would like to buy from a reputable breeder, does anyone know the average price? I've seen from 1,500 to 3,500, dont want to go over 2500.
 

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The first question that comes to my mind is- what makes a breeder reputable to you?

In the US, If you are looking for a pup from titled and health tested parents I think the lowest you can hope to find a puppy for would be about $1800 and depending on the pedigree, desired qualities and traits, and the reputation/competency of the breeder and their dogs you could find yourself paying up to $3000. You should be able to find something nice in the 2-2500 range
 

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If your budget is 2500 I am sure you can find a great dog for that $$. The one thing I will say is definitely be careful with people claiming to have DDR lines. From what I have heard the true lines are far and few, though many misrepresent. Hopefully someone here who knows the DDR lines that are still around will weigh in. What qualities known to DDR are drawing you to this combo? I only ask because a lot of WGWL x Czech may posses those very qualities, and will be more available which will open up your search more to locality, timing of litters and availability, etc.
 

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Coming from an equine background, and especially with Arabians, the concept of geographical "lines" (Polish, Egyptian, Crabbet etc) is commonplace, acceptable and frankly very useful in my mind. There are breeders who have and use dogs whose lineage stays within families of dogs originating from a certain criteria.....and this is easy and helpful in looking at pedigrees as priorities tend to cluster for breeders the same way.

That being said.....there are straight DDR dogs around....a few breeders in Germany still do DDR dogs - Parchimerland for one....a breeder (now deceased) named Steve Lino in FL was a wealth of knowledge and source of imported DDR dogs up until a few years back. I bred to a straight DDR male from his breeding for my Q litter...so there are DDR dogs and litters that have DDR lines.

But - what are your goals? Why do you want a Czech DDR dog? Frankly, the Czech lines are fast becoming more WGRWL every day....a friend imported a "Czech" female who is technically only about a quarter Czech lines - a little Belgian and the rest WGR....but since the dog was bred in the CR, and carries a couple Czech kennel names close up, that is only evident by looking at 6-10 generations of the pedigree.

Lee
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I think a reputable breeder is dedicated to improving breed who is personally involved in training and titling their dogs. I would like to get involved in IPO & SAR. I want a dog that has high/med drive, good temperament, & strong nerves. I've read that Czech/Ddr dogs have these qualities.
 

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Many dogs of all lines have those things....it is more important to find a breeder-litter who has produced the type of dog you are looking for regardless of what lines....I have seen nervy, poor temperament etc in WGR and in Czech lines....and good in both

Lee
 
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Both of my dogs were around $2k. One is mainly Czech/DDR with a hint of WGR. The other is Czech/WGR. Same breeder. Both very stable (one a little more sensitive to things than the other) and wonderful "off" switches.


Depending on where you're buying, $2500 should cover the whole shebang or close to it (pup + shipping if you don't go to pick up).
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
I agree, thanks for the info. What would be the best way to find a breeder? Should I just look up their websites or is there another place where they post litters?
 

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I agree, thanks for the info. What would be the best way to find a breeder? Should I just look up their websites or is there another place where they post litters?
First go out to different venues and see some different dogs. Trials, training, even conformation shows. See the different dogs doing things. Meet people and their dogs to get first hand opinions. Here's one source:

https://www.germanshepherddog.com/events-new/
 

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Definitely second going to venues you are interested in before sourcing a dog. You may be interested in IPO, and yet there may be no IPO clubs near you or currently accepting new members. Now you have a dog with the potential to do IPO but not able to do it. Same goes for SAR - learn about it, see if it suits you. SAR is exceptionally demanding and will take a lot out of you, and I don't think you'll be able to pursue both simultaneously. They are emotionally demanding in their own way, plus they demand lots of personal time commitment and lots of your own monetary investment (training equipment, club fees, seminars, trials, etc).

This is coming from a new dog owner with a low drive working line GSD. I asked for a lower drive dog because I didn't know what I was getting into and was scared of the whole "working line" ownership title, because I didn't know what I really wanted. But because I fell in love with the sport, I still train 4x a week with my dog in the winter, not including training I do on my own time outside of my club or seminars I may choose to attend. During the summer it's far more often because I also track.

See if it suits you before diving in head first. And see if you mesh with your club or any other training venues before getting a dog with a specific purpose in mind. Putting the cart before the horse can bite you in the butt later.
 

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We got ours at Vom Eichenhain breeders in Southern Vermont. He's 9 months old now and is the best tempered dog I have ever had. They breed working line, East German Shepherds and they are AKC registered the owners are very knowledgeable. If you google Vom Eichenhain they have a website with photos and such.
 

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My bias is that the modern DDR dogs are not representative of the early DDR dogs. Todays dogs are desired mainly for their looks such as large heads, dark pigment and strong bone. They are usually not good candidates for sport due to lower prey drive. If I were to consider a DDR dog, the post above suggested a kennel that has dogs from Parchimer land, who probably has some of the best knowledge of DDR bloodlines. My understanding is the early, strong DDR dogs were valued for their confident sharpness and at times, very high dominance, which has been watered down over time. More of a defensive dog. If you are interested in sport, you might consider a breeding from West German and Czech lines, but the dogs in the pedigree are more important than the country they come from. There are West German lines that are more "sporty" and lines that have good drive and aggression. Same is true of Czech lines. Probably can find some DDR dogs with better prey drive than is typical for them as well. You have to decide what you want to do with the dog and then decide what traits you would like to see in the dog. That is just the beginning.
 

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You won't likely have the time to commit to IPO and SAR.
That would be the easiest of problems. In this case there's a bigger one.

I can't think of a single SAR organization (at least out West) that will allow a dog who has been through any kind of bite training to join.

So that effectively rules out your IPO training.

Never mind the fact that you're going to have very different ways in which you track.

It tends to me to be an either/or proposition.
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
Thanks for the advice! What would the difference be between training a pup and a older dog over 2 that has the same qualities?
 

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2 years of work. 2 years of learning and gaining experience in training and knowledge of dog behavior.
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
If the dog had no training or basic obedience would it be more difficult than training a pup?
 
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