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Can anyone tell me a little bit about these lines, experience with these lines? What would be the best sport, venue, outlet for these lines? I'm thinking they can succeed in anything they try, but what would be the best thing to keep them busy and in work mode? I'm positive mine is czech lines, maybe mixed with some german working lines. He loves chasing cats, but doesn't chase rabbits, geese, or ducks. He likes the flirt pole, but not nearly as much as my other GSD. He has his nose to the ground quite often. He likes to climb on anything that he can....He was not really interested in the puzzle/interactive games. He loves playing tug and ball. Right now everything is play play play and all games.
 

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Just a thought

Have you considered SAR (search and rescue) with him. If his nose is to the ground but doesn't chase the wildlife, might be a good match.
 

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Just a thought

Have you considered SAR (search and rescue) with him. If his nose is to the ground but doesn't chase the wildlife, might be a good match.
To be honest I have never thought SAR, that could be quite rewarding for him and I. I wonder where I would look for that kind of training or if its even available anywhere near me.
 

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You can google/yahoo search and rescue. Surely you must have something close as we have several in Arkansas. I noticed after you posted he likes to climb also. Could be fun and "pay it forward" in your community. Good luck and keep us posted. :)
 

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SAR is something that I'm sure Nancy could give you more info on, but from what I understand it's a very very time consuming committment..

Masi is 3/4 czech/ddr , depends on the dog, I try to find something they are good at and enjoy and go with it.

Masi likes to track, we do alot of that, (no training around, so it's a 'fun' thing for her), works her mind as well as her body.

You could always try herding,tracking, obedience( for whatever reason Masi likes obedience as well),,agility.. Possibilities are endless..
 

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"I'm positive mine is czech lines, maybe mixed with some german working lines. "
Why?

don't forget you are training a dog, your dog , not a "lines" .

does your dog have focus. Why not try competitive obedience .
 

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"I'm positive mine is czech lines, maybe mixed with some german working lines. "
Why?

don't forget you are training a dog, your dog , not a "lines" .

does your dog have focus. Why not try competitive obedience .
When he's focused he is really focused. We are just now breaking through that focus on other things. We are working on him being able to look at things, but he has to check in with me...the trainer calls it auto check in and its working. I have to get him passed his "excited" reactivity with other dogs before he does anything with other dogs around.
 

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Masi likes to track, we do alot of that, (no training around, so it's a 'fun' thing for her), works her mind as well as her body.

You could always try herding,tracking, obedience( for whatever reason Masi likes obedience as well),,agility.. Possibilities are endless..
I can do the tracking with no other dogs involved for now. How do you set it up for fun?
 

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I can't wait to see him progress. Glad you got someone to help you with him.
 

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"When he's focused he is really focused. We are just now breaking through that focus on other things."

are you saying he is focused on whatever it is that he wants to do and he shuts you out?
 

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I can't wait to see him progress. Glad you got someone to help you with him.
Everyday he settles down a little more. Today he is much calmer then yesterday, maybe its the drugs I gave him? Just kidding, I didn't give him anything, why would I do that when I might need it:D He is getting very good at walking away from the cats on his own, I still have to intervene sometimes, but its getting less and less. I think its important for him to make his own decisions and the right ones...I think I'm going to get some cat nip to calm the cats down..
 

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"When he's focused he is really focused. We are just now breaking through that focus on other things."

are you saying he is focused on whatever it is that he wants to do and he shuts you out?
This is what we are working on every day with dogs outside of the house. Today we made lots of progress at the Petsmart Doggie Daycare..I walked past that window at least 50 times, treating him and keeping his focus on me. A week ago I couldn't get him to focus on me for nothing or break his focus on another dog. Now he does watch me and if I move it gets his attention and he moves with me. The trainer says that we are bonding nicely, which is pretty important so that I can keep him focused on me...I have to be more important then everything else.
 

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If you're working with reactivity issues that could make group classes/training difficult, then my first suggestion would be: tricks! You can teach them at home, so you don't have to worry about other dogs interfering with your guy's concentration, and they will hone your skills and creativity as a trainer like nothing else. Also, trick training is fun and rewarding and really builds up your bond, so it should dovetail nicely with the other work you're doing.

Kikopup's channel on youtube has loads of good ideas and tutorials. Kyra Sundance's book 101 Dog Tricks (and more, but that's the one I'd start with) is great if you prefer a more hard copy approach.

You can choose whatever tricks are suited to your dog's interests. If he likes sniffing things, maybe the nosework tricks like object discrimination and finding hidden objects would be good fits. I've posted the margarita trick and the Easter Egg trick on this board before, but those are both scent-based (margarita trick relies on scent discrimination, Easter Egg is about finding hidden things by scent). They're fun and goofy but they really do challenge your dog's brain like woah.

Here's Pongu doing a relatively easy nosework trick -- Kyra Sundance's shell game:


Couple of notes here:

-- start with food if your dog hasn't had any prior scentwork training (I don't know if yours has or not, so I'll assume not; if I'm wrong, many apologies!), since in my experience this is the easiest way to get most dogs hooked on the concept;

-- flowerpots are good objects to use as "shells" because they're too heavy for the dog to just shove out of the way easily, and the hole in the top makes it easy for the dog to sniff the hidden food inside;

-- if your dog is having difficulty figuring out where the hidden food is, try rubbing a little bit around the top of the opening (sort of like I'm doing with the turkey when I reload the pots);

-- you can combine this with distance work/Stays/whatever else you want to work on with your dog (this is why I have Pongu go to the mat and hold a Stand Stay while I reload the pots); this reinforces any other impulse control work you may be doing, and you don't have to reward the in-between behavior, because the opportunity to play another round of the shell game is already a sufficient reward.

In my experience, sending a dog away for very small "interrupts" like that, and then calling the dog back for another round of fun! engagement! with! you! makes for a stronger bond and a dog who works with more enthusiasm. It's a subtle effect, but over time, I've found that it builds up to be quite strong. :)
 

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will track and chase cats, hmmmm, you could join my pack of K9 warriors to save the environment, start a US chapter.

just sayin.....
 

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Discussion Starter #15
If you're working with reactivity issues that could make group classes/training difficult, then my first suggestion would be: tricks! You can teach them at home, so you don't have to worry about other dogs interfering with your guy's concentration, and they will hone your skills and creativity as a trainer like nothing else. Also, trick training is fun and rewarding and really builds up your bond, so it should dovetail nicely with the other work you're doing.

Kikopup's channel on youtube has loads of good ideas and tutorials. Kyra Sundance's book 101 Dog Tricks (and more, but that's the one I'd start with) is great if you prefer a more hard copy approach.

You can choose whatever tricks are suited to your dog's interests. If he likes sniffing things, maybe the nosework tricks like object discrimination and finding hidden objects would be good fits. I've posted the margarita trick and the Easter Egg trick on this board before, but those are both scent-based (margarita trick relies on scent discrimination, Easter Egg is about finding hidden things by scent). They're fun and goofy but they really do challenge your dog's brain like woah.

Here's Pongu doing a relatively easy nosework trick -- Kyra Sundance's shell game:

Pongu Shell Game 03-13-13 - YouTube

Couple of notes here:

-- start with food if your dog hasn't had any prior scentwork training (I don't know if yours has or not, so I'll assume not; if I'm wrong, many apologies!), since in my experience this is the easiest way to get most dogs hooked on the concept;

-- flowerpots are good objects to use as "shells" because they're too heavy for the dog to just shove out of the way easily, and the hole in the top makes it easy for the dog to sniff the hidden food inside;

-- if your dog is having difficulty figuring out where the hidden food is, try rubbing a little bit around the top of the opening (sort of like I'm doing with the turkey when I reload the pots);

-- you can combine this with distance work/Stays/whatever else you want to work on with your dog (this is why I have Pongu go to the mat and hold a Stand Stay while I reload the pots); this reinforces any other impulse control work you may be doing, and you don't have to reward the in-between behavior, because the opportunity to play another round of the shell game is already a sufficient reward.

In my experience, sending a dog away for very small "interrupts" like that, and then calling the dog back for another round of fun! engagement! with! you! makes for a stronger bond and a dog who works with more enthusiasm. It's a subtle effect, but over time, I've found that it builds up to be quite strong. :)

This is a good idea...I just started find it. I remove him and hide his toy...he is really good at that and found it everytime.
 

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nice youtubes , good idea , might be a challenge since "....He was not really interested in the puzzle/interactive games"

not a SAR candidate , which has nothing to do with it , meaning SAR being rewarding to the dog .

start with asking him to solve a problem to earn his dinner .
Merciel's youtube should give you some ideas.
 

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I actually saw some Czech working lines in action so to speak....if trained properly it is a high drive dog that is very aggressive and intimidating....the bite on most of them was very steady and hard....not a lot of readjusting of the jaw. Very good obedience as well. Czech lines are the lines I am gonna get my first pup from for sure.
 

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IF you are talking about the dog in the photo in your avatar, it certainly does not look like it has anywhere close to predominately Czech lines.
 

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". I have to get him passed his "excited" reactivity with other dogs before he does anything with other dogs around. "

I believe in another thread -- no treats doesn't listen -- you said that when new dogs joined the class all the dogs got treats -- yours. Do you think that you are unintentionally reinforcing reaction to new dogs since new dogs mean treats coming
 
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