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Hi!
Any time I try to get Ursa, my 7 month old puppy, to do something she does not want to do, like getting off of the recliner, she resorts to these crazy biting tantrums. During these tantrums she runs around wild eyed and biting my hands and legs any time I get near her and then goes back to whatever she was doing that I was trying to stop her from. If I try to get her to stop again by gently pulling her off of the chair or taking the thing she is chewing away she does it all over again. She sometimes even does this when I just tell her to stop/get off. Otherwise she is super sweet but sometimes disobedient. What can I do to get her to stop doing this and listen to me.

Thank you for any help!
 

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My inner Mom/Drill Sergeant says toss her butt in the crate for a time out. Calm commanding voice, and no bologna. Human is the boss. Sounds like a game or just plain teenager sass. I also have no idea how to deal with a seven month old GSD, so take that with a grain of salt.

Also, how long has this been going on? Might be first heat. My adult GSD acted like a *complete turd* for about three weeks when she was in heat.

ETA from the net: Adolescence..."If (s)he were human, this would be the stage at which you would hide the car keys." <--- cracks me up.
 

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She has been doing stuff like this for since I got her, but in the last couple of weeks it has gotten much worse. I’ll try the time outs in the crate and see if that calms her down next time she has a tantrum. Thanks for the suggestion :)
 

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Could it be she just wants to engage with you and gets way too excited?Instead of grabbing her or making her stop whatever she's doing - grab a toy or tug and call her to you,then reward with a game.Take the opportunity to run through some obedience commands while you've got her attention.As she matures and gains more self control you'll be able to get her away from whatever in a calmer manner.
 

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If you allow your dog to EVER be disobedient, you are effectively training her to think it's okay. STOP doing that! The onus falls on you. First you have to exercise a lot of self control! Learn when to use a command and when to avoid using a command because of the high likelihood that the dog is too hyper to listen. In those instances don't use a command, physically gather, corral, or do whatever it is you want, without saying anything.

When you give a command, on the other hand, don't ever do so without following through and enforcing what you've said...it's never optional. If it is, it's always going to be optional in your dog's mind!

It sounds to me, from what you've said, that your dog has been doing this stuff for some time. Change your routine and practices now, and the dog can and will learn the new rules. But don't delay the change, or you'll have BIG problems in the near future.
 

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A female dog in heat will display personality changes. That's not an excuse to let it fly, but it can help with adjusting training and expectations if an owner knows why those behavior changes are suddenly occurring. As it can happen anytime from sixth months to a year, it's also good to watch for so an owner can prepare themselves and understand their particular dog's needs and responses for the future.
 

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Mine used to do this as well! So frustrating!


First, I totally agree with the assessment to give her a time-out in the crate if she resorts to the frenzied tantrum. Also, something that worked well for me (once she learned that the crate time-out was a possibility):
* If my pup was on the couch, etc., and I wanted her to get off, I'd calmly but firmly give her the command
* If she didn't immediately do what I'd asked, and instead started to get into the first stage of a 'frenzy', I'd get up and stand in front of her (not quite crowding her, but close) with my back straight, arms crossed, and look at her very sternly - trying to project "you better listen, this wasn't a request"
* As soon as she displayed some type of de-escalation body language (sitting, breaking eye contact, lowering her head, etc.) I'd immediately take a step back and soften my posture, then issue the command again
* 9 out of 10 times, the second command would be listened to


The "I'm the boss" posture, and giving her a choice to "make a good decision and listen", combined with her knowing that the next step was a crate time-out, really seemed to get through to her. It's very frustrating and easy to lose your cool when your dog is going berserk and running / nipping / being a general pain, but calm and controlled is much more effective whenever possible. Good luck! :)
 

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Mine used to do this as well! So frustrating!


First, I totally agree with the assessment to give her a time-out in the crate if she resorts to the frenzied tantrum. Also, something that worked well for me (once she learned that the crate time-out was a possibility):
* If my pup was on the couch, etc., and I wanted her to get off, I'd calmly but firmly give her the command
* If she didn't immediately do what I'd asked, and instead started to get into the first stage of a 'frenzy', I'd get up and stand in front of her (not quite crowding her, but close) with my back straight, arms crossed, and look at her very sternly - trying to project "you better listen, this wasn't a request"
* As soon as she displayed some type of de-escalation body language (sitting, breaking eye contact, lowering her head, etc.) I'd immediately take a step back and soften my posture, then issue the command again
* 9 out of 10 times, the second command would be listened to


The "I'm the boss" posture, and giving her a choice to "make a good decision and listen", combined with her knowing that the next step was a crate time-out, really seemed to get through to her. It's very frustrating and easy to lose your cool when your dog is going berserk and running / nipping / being a general pain, but calm and controlled is much more effective whenever possible. Good luck! :)
I used to do this with my big-boy when he was small. It worked well. They are so good at reading body language. Just watch theirs to make sure as soon as they give in, you relax. The idea is to exude authority, not punishment.
 

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Hi!
Any time I try to get Ursa, my 7 month old puppy, to do something she does not want to do, like getting off of the recliner, she resorts to these crazy biting tantrums. During these tantrums she runs around wild eyed and biting my hands and legs any time I get near her and then goes back to whatever she was doing that I was trying to stop her from. If I try to get her to stop again by gently pulling her off of the chair or taking the thing she is chewing away she does it all over again. She sometimes even does this when I just tell her to stop/get off. Otherwise she is super sweet but sometimes disobedient. What can I do to get her to stop doing this and listen to me.

Thank you for any help!
Your dog sounds bored and under exercised. How about taking her AND you off the recliner and outside. My dog is almost 8 and still does this if our routine gets disrupted. She's playing, burning off energy and if you find it inappropriate then fix the root cause. Work on obedience, play fetch, go for a walk, learn some tricks.
 

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She does it because it works. You have let her think it’s alright. I agree with Sabi, she needs mental and physical exercise. There is no point in crating an unexercised dog. Get her tired first and it will stop. Also, try letting her out, she might have to go. When mine get hyper for no obvious reason, they usually need to go outside.
 
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