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Discussion Starter #1
I just put Willow in her crate...I'm sick and tired of her constantly, CONSTANTLY, bothering me while I'm trying to work. This has been going on since this whole COVID thing began, since I began working from home.

I'm like 90% sure she does this to beg for food. She's a horrible beggar, HORRIBLE, despite my never giving her any human food. She'll lie on her bed or elsewhere in the living room but as soon as I make a noise, move, get a snack from the kitchen, whatever, she gets up and comes up to me and nuzzles my hand or stands there staring at me. EVERY TIME. I tell her "go sit down" or I ignore her, and 10 minutes later she does it again.

ALL DAY.

so I'm just sick of it and it's past time she learned not to bother me like this. Sometimes I do chuck her out in the backyard with a Kong but the smoke is so bad lately. So I put her in her crate.

Is that OK? I don't want her to think that going to her crate is punishment, but if I do this every day as soon as she starts bothering me will she learn to quit it? Is it unreasonable for me to expect her to leave me alone when I'm working?
 

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I work remote (and have since before COVID), so my dogs sit with me in the office all day. They don't bother me for attention, but when I get up and move around they are like my shadows. They follow me into whatever room I'm going to and plop down. Then follow me right back into the office and lay down on their beds. I do make sure and exercise them in the morning before working and try to take them out briefly around lunch time.

For your dog, I don't think crating her while you're working is a problem, but I would be careful about how you crate her. If you're irritated or angry she might be able to tell and begin to associate the crate with that. It also might be a good idea just to crate her as you normally did before COVID, so that she doesn't come to rely on your being home all the time and then deal with your sudden absence during the day when you eventually do go back to the office. That's just my two cents, though. Maybe someone else has a different opinion.
 

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I don't see a problem with giving my dogs "human food". They get some of most everything I eat and I have no problem with sharing snacks with them. I've never understood not doing that. My dogs are family and if they want some of what I'm eating, that's fine by me.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
I don't see a problem with giving my dogs "human food". They get some of most everything I eat and I have no problem with sharing snacks with them. I've never understood not doing that. My dogs are family and if they want some of what I'm eating, that's fine by me.
Cool. I disagree 100% but you do you. For me it's about the begging. She's a HORRID beggar--I'm guessing her previous owners' fault-- and she needs to learn she can't eat what I'm eating, ever. Not to mention the wide suite of human foods that can make dogs ill or even kill them (onions, raisins, avocado, etc.).
 

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Discussion Starter #5
I work remote (and have since before COVID), so my dogs sit with me in the office all day. They don't bother me for attention, but when I get up and move around they are like my shadows. They follow me into whatever room I'm going to and plop down. Then follow me right back into the office and lay down on their beds. I do make sure and exercise them in the morning before working and try to take them out briefly around lunch time.

For your dog, I don't think crating her while you're working is a problem, but I would be careful about how you crate her. If you're irritated or angry she might be able to tell and begin to associate the crate with that. It also might be a good idea just to crate her as you normally did before COVID, so that she doesn't come to rely on your being home all the time and then deal with your sudden absence during the day when you eventually do go back to the office. That's just my two cents, though. Maybe someone else has a different opinion.
Yeah, I wouldn't mind her following me when I'm moving around the house, I just hate the constant begging for attention or food or whatever it is. I would love if she could just lie down and chill while I'm working. Might have to start putting her outside more, because that's what I'd prefer to do for days that I'm not at home, rather than crating her inside. I am also trying to be really careful about how I'm crating her, telling her "good girl" when she goes in, sometimes giving her a treat....never doing it when I'm outwardly angry.

Also I try to be really disciplined about giving her exercise every morning. We usually do a 20-minute walk followed by 5 or so minutes of fetch; so yeah, after that she'll lie down and chill out for maybe an hour. That's it. :) Somebody recently replied to another of my posts with an article that said getting dogs used to high activity/eustress can make behavioral problems worse instead of better, and some days (yesterday, for example) i take her into the field with me and she goes NUTS with excitement/energy. Yesterday we were setting up scat boards for rodent sampling and she got to run and jump around in a dry wetland for 2 straight hours. So maybe crating periodically, for longer periods of time, would be good for her...?
 

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Honestly, I think the telling thing is often your discourse when describing the situation with your dog. You're obviously aware that you are tense, stressed, angry, etc., which I would imagine would exacerbate the situation quite a lot. Dogs feel the energy around them quite a lot, in my experience, and being annoyed about something naturally makes feel worse than it is at times.

I looked at the article you are referring to, and although it might apply in some situations, I would honestly imagine that your dog is just a bit bored to be honest and wants / enjoys your company. She may be concerned with your annoyed behavior and not know what to do with herself, some dogs can be quite tender. I know a lot of people might disagree, but for a human the life of many dogs would be quite depressing... I certainly wouldn't want to be cooped up inside all day (you'd have to kill me before making me work an office job!). I think a sedentary lifestyle contributes more to long-term stress than over-exercise does for almost all average lifestyles (both for humans and dogs). With that being said, I know people have to work and not everyone gets to work outside... but if you can approach the situation with more compassion and understanding, maybe that will help to diffuse some of your annoyance towards her? It is difficult to say what you should do regarding crating vs not crating, as you usually are at work and the dog is used to being crated during the day anyway. So I guess that part would be up to you.
 

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I am a big believer of utilitzing the crate. If you don't feel like dealing with your dog at that moment, or they are becoming too much, put them away. This was advice given to me by a trainer, and it has worked very well for me Now if the time your crating your dog starts to become excessive, you will probably need too look at a better solution. My dogs are crated when I go to work.
 

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Cool. I disagree 100% but you do you. For me it's about the begging. She's a HORRID beggar--I'm guessing her previous owners' fault-- and she needs to learn she can't eat what I'm eating, ever. Not to mention the wide suite of human foods that can make dogs ill or even kill them (onions, raisins, avocado, etc.).
I don't do begging. We have treats we share, but begging is a no go for me.
I sometimes crate through the day it's fine as long as not abused. Through our shut down phase here I would often just crate Shadow and go outside, just so she wasn't used to me being around 24/7.
Since it's the begging that annoys you I would simply remove her from your vicinity when you eat.
Shadow has learned that if she removes herself while I eat there is a reward coming when I'm done.
Shareables are carrots, snap peas, cauliflower, green beans, cucumber and the homemade gingersnaps I get from the bakery that are for dogs to share with people. And apples!
 

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Of course I would never feed my dog anything harmful to him. I may disagree with you, but I'm not stupid.

If my dog is annoying me or I'm eating something I don't want to share, I just tell him to go away. It's no big deal for me.
 

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I am home all day with my dog and he gets crated for periods throughout the day. My dog also does at home school aid during the school day so he has to settle in the school room while I work with the kids. I use a small carpet pad as his ‘place’ and if he’s not working or sitting on the pad during school time, then he’s in the crate.

You might want to consider teaching a firm ‘place’ command. Make that ‘place’ be the most rewarding place ever. Start for short durations and big rewards but whenever that place pad comes out, your dog is on it and yummy treats are given.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Of course I would never feed my dog anything harmful to him. I may disagree with you, but I'm not stupid.

If my dog is annoying me or I'm eating something I don't want to share, I just tell him to go away. It's no big deal for me.
ok. Well obviously that does not work for me, hence the entire purpose of this post, and the part where I said that when I tell her to "go away", she keeps trying, over and over again. But congrats on your patience I guess?

I imagine there are plenty of threads on here more suited to debating the acceptability of feeding human food to your dog, but this isn't one of them, and my deepest apologies if I was not clear in my original post. I will not feed my dog human food. Your remarks contribute literally nothing to the problem I am having.

Not trying to be super-rude here but those are the kinds of inane, worthless, condescending replies that infuriate me on this forum.
 

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There's absolutely nothing wrong with crating your dog so you can focus and get your work completed. Nothing!

Now, looking down the road ~

If you're habitual with how you work (a certain desk, a certain spot, etc) you can teach her that when you are in that spot, she gets zero from you. No eye contact, no pets, no food, no fetch, nothing. She can either relax and entertain herself, or go back to the crate elsewhere. Once you shut your laptop or turn off the lamp/leave the desk or whatever your "work is done" cue is, your attention is up for grabs again. It can be annoying at first but if you're consistent they learn quick. This is how I teach my dogs to behave in my office. If they won't behave, they can't hang out in my office. I gotta work, or we can't afford the dog food. :)
 

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Honestly, I think the telling thing is often your discourse when describing the situation with your dog. You're obviously aware that you are tense, stressed, angry, etc., which I would imagine would exacerbate the situation quite a lot. Dogs feel the energy around them quite a lot, in my experience, and being annoyed about something naturally makes feel worse than it is at times.

I looked at the article you are referring to, and although it might apply in some situations, I would honestly imagine that your dog is just a bit bored to be honest and wants / enjoys your company. She may be concerned with your annoyed behavior and not know what to do with herself, some dogs can be quite tender. I know a lot of people might disagree, but for a human the life of many dogs would be quite depressing... I certainly wouldn't want to be cooped up inside all day (you'd have to kill me before making me work an office job!). I think a sedentary lifestyle contributes more to long-term stress than over-exercise does for almost all average lifestyles (both for humans and dogs). With that being said, I know people have to work and not everyone gets to work outside... but if you can approach the situation with more compassion and understanding, maybe that will help to diffuse some of your annoyance towards her? It is difficult to say what you should do regarding crating vs not crating, as you usually are at work and the dog is used to being crated during the day anyway. So I guess that part would be up to you.
Thanks for this. Yeah, part of the problem is my job can be very stressful....I'm frequently talking on the phone with angry ranchers, or I'm myself getting frustrated with hunters/ranchers interrupting me (which 99% of the time I keep the frustration out of my voice, but Willow can probably tell...). Or like last week, getting multiple phone calls, one on top of the other, or in rapid-fire, dealing with a pressing issue (in this case, elk eating someone's crops, and the rancher using me as the middle-man between him and the landowner, and both of them calling me over and over and asking me to talk to the other person about something, and me being the poor government employee who has to be really calm and diplomatic and not just tell them to FREAKING TALK TO EACH OTHER), and I clearly get a bit strung out and frustrated. Often during all this she'll walk up and pester me, maybe because she can sense my irritation and yeah, doesn't know what she should be doing. I feel sorry for her during those times.... because then her pestering me just makes me more irritated/distracted.

Ugh. I need a vacation...and it can be hard to predict when those things will happen, and crating her/putting her outside might make her feel like she's being punished? I dunno. She's definitely sensitive. Might need to just start getting her used to spending more time outside on her own; it's what I was originally planning on doing, pre-COVID, and have been putting it off.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
There's absolutely nothing wrong with crating your dog so you can focus and get your work completed. Nothing!

Now, looking down the road ~

If you're habitual with how you work (a certain desk, a certain spot, etc) you can teach her that when you are in that spot, she gets zero from you. No eye contact, no pets, no food, no fetch, nothing. She can either relax and entertain herself, or go back to the crate elsewhere. Once you shut your laptop or turn off the lamp/leave the desk or whatever your "work is done" cue is, your attention is up for grabs again. It can be annoying at first but if you're consistent they learn quick. This is how I teach my dogs to behave in my office. If they won't behave, they can't hang out in my office. I gotta work, or we can't afford the dog food. :)
Thanks...working on this. My house is weird and small and I don't have a dedicated office, just a desk in the kitchen. So I can't shut her out, unless it's in her crate or outside. But yeah I'll try to be better about ignoring. She's persistent sometimes.
 

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I work form home and my dogs have free run of the house while I work. 90% of the time Rogan is laying on a dog bed beside my couch or office desk, depending on where I'm working. I do take them out several times during the day so every time I might get up to use the bathroom or grab a coffee for instance, they jump up and follow me to see if we're going up. When I sit down again, they generally just settle (sometimes with a huge GSD sigh). The pup has at various times tired staring at me, heat butting, barking and whining at me to do something with him. All are a no-go.

They both have a solid place command which I would have advised you to teach early since I don't believe in daytime crating and don't think it's fair as a regular occurrence or habit. I never have to use it now.

As frustrating as it can be, your dog just wants to do something with you (you're his favorite person!) but needs to learn and accept your schedule.

And human food for dogs is a no go for me, begging even more so. They just don't need it and it produces more problems than help for the average dog owner. My opinion. The exception from my daughter is a little bit of cheese when it's out. Dogs can hear cheese being unwrapped from 700 feet away :ROFLMAO:
 

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Thanks...working on this. My house is weird and small and I don't have a dedicated office, just a desk in the kitchen. So I can't shut her out, unless it's in her crate or outside. But yeah I'll try to be better about ignoring. She's persistent sometimes.
Don't let guilt over this stress you out. We all have to get our work done, and this year is weirder than most! She'll be fine crated so you can focus.
 

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Not trying to be super-rude here but those are the kinds of inane, worthless, condescending replies that infuriate me on this forum.

So glad you aren't trying to be rude! :)

That said, there is no problem with crating your dog if she is being a pest. Or like someone else said, teach her a place command, or a go away or go lie down command.

Relax and chill. You dog just wants your attention. If you can't provide that at the time, put her in the crate. It's not the end of the world.
 

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when moo first came to live with us he was a licker!! He'd get up next to you lick your arm to death!! I'd tell him no, get down, hold him back at arms length, he finally quit, maybe he was just trying to show himself as a good boy that'd make a great addition to our home, who knows! My daughter used to crate her dogs from time to time during the day for like breaks. They had to do crate and rotate with two of their dogs, so think it'd be similar to you crating her from time to time. The begging you might have a little cup of kibble you could toss her a piece, might even have on your desk so you could toss her a piece while dealing with the ranchers! A few pets and toss and catch a kibble or two could help you relax a little while talkin maybe!
 

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This is where corrections come into play. Too often people are afraid to punish their dog.
This is where corrections come into play. Too often people are afraid to effectively and fairly discipline their dog so that clear expectations are set and communicated, such that it's more fair to the dog than vague negotiations.
 
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