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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Well, day two of having 8 week puppy home, and I'm losing it!

He whines and cries in his cage like crazy. He is VERY AFFECTIONATE,
and needs people. The breeder said he is the most attached to people
of the whole litter of nine.

We picked him up at 2:30 yesterday and he didn't pee till this morning!
I kept taking him outside every hour or every time he circled and sniffed, but
no pee! He just plops down, shivering,wants to get back inside, or licks the snow.

Then this morning, I let him out of his cage after a good stretch of about
3 hours sleep, and left him for one second to use
the bathroom and he peed a 1/2 gallon in the hall way. That one was my fault!!
He's peed three more times in the house while we're not looking.

The good news is that he is poo-ing outside!

It's the wining in his cage that is difficult. I talked to him to soothe him in his cage
last night, and that sometimes works. Another time, I gave up and let him out.
He slept on the floor next to his cage for about an hour.

When he whines in his cage, I don't know if it's
a need to pee or just hating his cage. If he's just peed, I know he just hates being separated. So this is stressful. He gets so panicky
when I walk out of the room while he's in his cage. Am I making things worse by keeping him crated?

I wonder if I've made a HUGE MISTAKE! I may not have the patience.

Know anybody who wants a pure-bred German Shepherd with a pedigree of well-bred ancestors? I paid $700 for him
and am tempted to give him to a family that can handle the puppy years. But
my son would be devastated.

I'm reading the books and watching the videos on crate-training, but I don't know if I can hack this.
 

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Where is his crate? The first few nights with our pup- we slept on the couch next to him... Then worked him into the crate- where he could see us. He then decided he wanted his space and sleeps in downstairs crate. It takes time and sounds like he just misses his litter and wants comfort. I'd give it a few weeks (2 or 3) and by then he should be more confident and less clingy? Good luck
 

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You have to ignore him. It can be really hard, but just try reading a book or even just thinking. The first couple weeks I had my pup's crate next to my bed, but IMO it's easier to ignore when he's in another room. You absolutely cannot give him attention or let him out because each time you do that you are prolonging how long it will take him to stop whining. It can take a few days to a couple weeks depending on how well you ignore the whining. Only take him out if he hasn't been out in a couple hours, and then don't praise him, just clip his leash on as calmly as possible and take him straight outside. If he goes, you can praise and lavish and treat him. After 10-15 minutes if he doesn't go, just put him back in the crate (this is for at night). Also, take up the water at 7 pm and give it back at 5-6 am to reduce middle-of-the-night pees. Doing this I only had to take my 8 week old out once or twice during the night for the first couple weeks, and by the time he was 5 months I didn't have to take him out at night at all.

During the day, just make sure he gets enough physical and mental stimulation and take him out every hour and a half to two hours (how often depends on your puppy- most people say two hours but I had to start at one hour for the first week with my puppy), and then he shouldn't whine in the crate after a couple weeks (or sooner, it all depends on the puppy and your consistency) if you only take him out of the crate when he's not whining or if it's been a couple hours and you know he might need to pee. Also make sure he poops after eating before you put him in the crate, eventually you will learn how long after eating he will need to go so you don't put him in the create too soon or too late.
 

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Yes, that first month you will be having a lot of doubts. Crate training is a must. Cover the crate and turn it into a cave. You must control the schedule. Wake him up and take him outside, first hourly, then every two and so on.

After you open the crate door carry the puppy. Do not let him walk.

You will have accidents. Just clean them up and move on.

Too many dogs are dead by two because people give up on them.

Keep reading, but watch that you don't get confused. Too many people opposing ideas.

My puppy is now six. I still have conflicts with all the advice. The price of the dog is only a small part of it. You need a lot of commitment if this dog is to live a long life.

Perhaps you are doing the right thing and rehoming the puppy while it is still young.

Otherwise, patience, patience, patience.
 

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Counter-conventional

I realize that this advice is going to go against the grain of a lot of members of this board and trainers. But it has to be said as I'm sure there are lot of members here who do this but don't want to be flamed about it.

LET THE PUPPY SLEEP IN YOUR BED. IF YOU'RE MARRIED LET THE PUPPY SLEEP WITH BOTH YOU AND YOUR WIFE (OR PARTNER, HEY, IT'S A MODERN WORLD).

We've had three. All slept in our suitably modified king-sized bed for about a week. During the day they were introduced to their crats.

After the first one fell out of our bed I put up some home-made railings that were L shaped to fit between the mattress and the box springs which prevented that forever more and for the succeeding two puppies. No midnight spills and no chills.

They don't crap or pee in the bed, AT ALL. They just sleep peacefully. However, whenever they really appeared to wake up I did take them outside and rang the little bell on the doorknob which we use to get them accustomed to pottying outside.

They're crate trained during the day and they do whine a bit. But by that time I'm awake and working around the house and it doesn't bother me a bit.

Forget all that crap about having the pup in your bed disturbing the Alpha arrangement. A puppy that's 8 weeks old and less than 12 lbs AIN'T GONNA BE THE ALPHA OF A FULL GROWN MAN AND ANYONE WHO THINKS THAT'S A POSSIBILITY NEEDS TO STUDY PROBABILITY A BIT MORE.

Besides, sleeping with the little bugger is one of the most rewarding and socializing things I can imagine.

WORKS WONDERFULLY FOR US. Our puppies have been beautifully adjusted not only to us, but also, to all humans after this experience. And, they've been incredibly loyal to us once grown.

LF
 

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I realize that this advice is going to go against the grain of a lot of members of this board and trainers. But it has to be said as I'm sure there are lot of members here who do this but don't want to be flamed about it.

LET THE PUPPY SLEEP IN YOUR BED. IF YOU'RE MARRIED LET THE PUPPY SLEEP WITH BOTH YOU AND YOUR WIFE (OR PARTNER, HEY, IT'S A MODERN WORLD).

We've had three. All slept in our suitably modified king-sized bed for about a week. During the day they were introduced to their crats.

After the first one fell out of our bed I put up some home-made railings that were L shaped to fit between the mattress and the box springs which prevented that forever more and for the succeeding two puppies. No midnight spills and no chills.

They don't crap or pee in the bed, AT ALL. They just sleep peacefully. However, whenever they really appeared to wake up I did take them outside and rang the little bell on the doorknob which we use to get them accustomed to pottying outside.

They're crate trained during the day and they do whine a bit. But by that time I'm awake and working around the house and it doesn't bother me a bit.

Forget all that crap about having the pup in your bed disturbing the Alpha arrangement. A puppy that's 8 weeks old and less than 12 lbs AIN'T GONNA BE THE ALPHA OF A FULL GROWN MAN AND ANYONE WHO THINKS THAT'S A POSSIBILITY NEEDS TO STUDY PROBABILITY A BIT MORE.

Besides, sleeping with the little bugger is one of the most rewarding and socializing things I can imagine.

WORKS WONDERFULLY FOR US. Our puppies have been beautifully adjusted not only to us, but also, to all humans after this experience. And, they've been incredibly loyal to us once grown.

LF
I think letting a fully trained, adult dog that is house trained and knows his place sleep on the bed with you could work, but not an 8 week old puppy. A puppy (or even newly adopted dog) needs structure and guidance, and sleeping with you should be a privilege, not a right. Once the puppy is house trained, knows some basic obedience, listens to you, and respects you, it should be okay to let the dog sleep with you, but only after giving permission. Make them give you a sit or something at least before letting them up on the bed. They should never be allowed on the furniture without permission from you, and after they respect you and have earned that privilege.

Crating the puppy during the night has multiple purposes; it isn't only to prove that you are the alpha. Puppies aren't going to be fighting for dominance; they just want to play and need a strong leader they can trust. Crating overnight teaches the puppy to learn how to sleep on its own, in its own space, which may very well need to happen someday. It also teaches the puppy to hold in its bladder for a few hours during the night. If the puppy is on the bed, it may pee or poop on one section of the bed, or even jump off and go somewhere else in your house during the night.

Another reason to crate during the night is to speed up the crate training. The more the puppy is used to the crate, the faster it will go. You can't have the puppy in the crate all day, but at night the puppy can be in the crate for a long period of time. This part of crate training also helps teach bladder control, so it also helps in the housebreaking process.

All in all, to each their own, but I believe crating puppies during the night is the way to go. There are just too many benefits to take advantage of and you can't keep an eye on the pup while you're sleeping, so it's for the puppy's own safety as well.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Thank you all!

Thank you all for the advice and personal sharing.

I really appreciate all the responses. This evening, I let Puppy cry it out in the crate. No talking, no comforting, no giving in. He yelped something fierce, but for only about 10 minutes or less. So, right now...quiet...I'm gonna try to sleep too before the sounds of yelping to pee goes off.

Yes, it's the life of the dog that is in my hands...that's a huge responsible. I do need patience. I will persevere and report back.
 

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Great job! There's usually a small period of time when the crying gets worse, and then stops, and it sounds like you got there :). Things seem to be going well, and I totally get what you mean about getting some sleep before he starts back up haha! Anytime Kody was in the crate and actually stopped barking, I'd be as quiet as possible trying to get to bed so that he wouldn't start up again.
 

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You've gotten some good advice. My husband took a few days off work when we got Jake last year. For the first few nights he slept with in on the futon in the basement. Then we took turns having his crate in our room (due to different shifts we sleep in different rooms). After a few weeks we moved him downstairs without an issue.

I thought house training was never going to work. It took almost 6 months before Jake stopped having accidents. Patience, patience, patience!


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