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I never had a dog hate the crate so much. Lucy is 13 weeks. I have tried to make the crate a positive place. I feed her in it. She gets lovely treats in it. Fortunately she doesn't seem to mind at night. She will go into her night crate (with a bit of encouragement) when I tell her it's bedtime and has been sleeping through the night for several days now. She tolerates the crate in the car. Not happy, but will hang out in it without screaming forever. BUT her "daytime" crate is a whole other story. She screams. She claws frantically to get out. She used to eat her food, and lick a kong a little before she started complaining. Now she doesn't even eat her food. She just starts screaming. I put her in the crate while trying to vacuum the last 2 days and she screams. I really do need her to be in the crate sometimes! Maybe I need to start all over again? HELP!

I have 3 crates....one in the car. One next to my bed. One in the kitchen. Well there is a fourth one when she outgrows the kitchen one.
 

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I think you are going to have to put up with it for a while until she learns to settle down. Perhaps try putting her in there for very short times and letting her back out when she is quiet.

Does she do the same thing if you put her in her "night time crate" during the day?
 

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Have you played Crate Games with her? When you put her in there, did you give hers something good to chew on like a meaty bone? When she goes in, do you throw a few pieces of food in so she associates the crate with good things?
 

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She needs to learn screaming gets her nowhere. Put her in the crate, then walk in and out of the room 100 times. Start coming back after only a few seconds. Don’t look at her, talk to her or react. If she is noisy, keep doing it over and over until she sees you are coming back. If she still shrieks, leave the room for a while and ignore her. The second she is quiet, walk back in but continue to ignore. Start increasing the time you are out of the room. If you walk back in and she is quiet, look at her and say Good dog! Then keep waking in and out. Gradually increase the time. It could take a week but eventually she will get the idea the only attention she gets is when she is quiet. Don’t even touch the crate to remove her unless she is quiet. If you go to let her out and she screeches, turn and leave the room. Even a look, a sound, a touch is praise and a reward.
 

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I had to start from a negative square one with crate training my puppy. He had a strong aversion to it. He would immediately pee or poop when the door closed. Then he would jump around screaming, trying not to get his feet dirty.

For us, we stopped using the crate and used baby gates to limit him to one room with a hardwood floor. (at least it wasn't carpeted)

Then we started from scratch by occasionally throwing toys and treats into the crate. At this point, I never closed the door.

Rather than just feed him in the crate, We played a lot of 'find it.' I would toss a handful of kibble into the crate for him to find. This was his primary source of kibble for a few days. We went through this for a week or so until he had no reaction at all to going in and out of his crate.

Next, I started shutting the door for a few seconds while his mind was occupied finding his kibble. But he could walk right out. I praised heavily while he was in the crate with the door closed, but went neutral when he came out. This went on for about a week. Over the course of the week, I started verbally cueing Ole to 'down' before I let him out.

Next, he started napping in his crate. I planned a bit so that his crate naps happened after a tiring play session. I would quietly sit working on my laptop next to his crate while he slept. We built this up to three two hour naps per day.

Then, I started leaving the room. At first, it was for a few seconds where I would stand quietly out of his line of vision. I gradually increased the duration and noise I made until I could make dinner outside of his vision. By this point, he was voluntarily going into his crate at bedtime.

He sleeps on the floor of my room. But, he gets about 10 minutes of snuggle time in my bed before I have him to get down. I think he associates bedtime with the crate, which results in snuggle time.

Because of his overall fear and aversion to his crate, I focused heavily on the positive. I tried to keep his success rate up in the 80% rate before I increased the difficulty. Any acting up meant that I went total boring. No reaction from me at all. Once, he had settled himself. I calmly opened the door.

During this entire process, I tried to be totally neutral while he was going in or coming out of his crate. The rewards and lovin' happened either while he was settled in his crate or after he calmly went about his business after he got out of the crate.

Finally, I tried really hard never to associated going in the crate with punishment. I used a house line so that if he acted up, I held onto or stepped on the line until he calmed down. It was only after he calmed down that I started directing him towards his crate.

This might be extream for your situation. But it worked for us.
 

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My dog doesn’t like daytime crate either. It may be because she hears voices, make sure it’s quiet inside during crate time. That’s what works for me.
 

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You can't give him when she's screaming, she's like a toddler. She will use any weakness against you. I would wait Della out the quiet times were brief in the beginning but she quickly figured out what was to her best advantage. She ended up loving her crate for all naps, she would head there on her own. (ear plugs)
 

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Discussion Starter #8
I think you are going to have to put up with it for a while until she learns to settle down. Perhaps try putting her in there for very short times and letting her back out when she is quiet.

Does she do the same thing if you put her in her "night time crate" during the day?
I am afraid to try that. Do not want to make her night time crate negative in any way! Plus at night I am there with her. One thought I had was that maybe the issue is being left, not just the crate. But why she would be howling with me vacuuming and seeing me doesn't really make sense.
 

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I am afraid to try that. Do not want to make her night time crate negative in any way! Plus at night I am there with her. One thought I had was that maybe the issue is being left, not just the crate. But why she would be howling with me vacuuming and seeing me doesn't really make sense.
Vacuuming is a different situation. It’s big, loud and scary.
 

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Have you played Crate Games with her? When you put her in there, did you give hers something good to chew on like a meaty bone? When she goes in, do you throw a few pieces of food in so she associates the crate with good things?
The only time I have left her in the crate is with her food and a stuffed kong. I threw food in randomly during the day so she would go in. She used to at least wait to eat her food before screaming. Now she doesn't even want to go in the crate to eat! So today I fed her in the crate but left the door open and stayed nearby. She was still hesitant to go in to eat but I guess she was hungry.
Oddly enough, I took her and my boy with me to visit my son this evening. They stayed in the car while I went in the house for about 1/2 hr. Gave her a couple of kibbles and she was fine.
 
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