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Bandit is 13 weeks old, we brought him home 7 days ago. We introduced him to the crate (door open) loved going inside laying down and playing with his toys. We started crate training, door closed this has not been a good thing. We started out with just a few minutes up to 15-30 minutes. He cried, yelped, barked and scratched even when he could see me in sight. I said nothing, did not even look his way and continued whatever I was doing. I had to work on Tuesday but only left him in the crate for 2 hours. When I came home he had knocked over his treat dish and his pad was all folded over and he was panting and crying. Yesterday I went to work, left him in the crate for 3 hours. I came home he had chewed the corner of his pad and was panting and crying. Today I pretended to leave, but went down to my basement office to listen to what happens when I am gone.....it sounded like he was throwing himself at the door, crying, barking and howling, this went on for an hour before I went upstairs. I have done everything exactly by the book. Anyone out there that has had similar problems?
 

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Hmmm. . . similar situation? Only every time I've ever crate trained a foster!

All the training books make it sound like crate training is happy fun time and the puppy will just fall in love with his crate. The truth is, every dog or pup I've ever seen hated the crate for the first week or two.

I would take out the treats, food, water, and pad. He doesn't need that stuff in his crate. I'll use a pad or blanket with a dog that doesn't chew, but if they show signs that they want to chew on it, they get no blanket. Chewing the blanket can cause a piece of it to become lodged in their digestive tract and require surgery. So. . . no blanket.

He should have regular feeding times, so no food in the crate. Water will just make him need to pee.

If you want, you can give him a Kong with some frozen peanut butter, plain yogurt, or cottage cheese to keep him occupied.

Also, it's important to make sure he's getting plenty of exercise and mental stimulation when he's not in his crate, to make him more likely to want to sleep during crate time.

Other than that, it sounds like you're doing everything right! He should pipe down in a week or so.
 

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One, while it's a personal preference, I wouldn't recommend leaving anything besides a Kong or another safe chew toy [safe as in, cannot be swallowed or ripped to pieces and swallowed] in the crate. Doubly so for puppies.

It takes puppies some time to adjust. They do, but until then, you have to ignore the dramatics. As long as you know the puppy has used the bathroom and is safe, there's no reason to be concerned over the crying. It tends to peter out once the pup realizes the crying isn't going to get them anywhere. Then they mellow out, and realize that the crate isn't actually so bad.
 

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Ditto on what Emoore and SchDDr said...exactly what we did and Frankie adjusted in about a week. Good luck and even if it takes awhile know that you are on the right path to keeping him safe :) He will figure out that the theatrics aren't getting him anywhere. By the way...I LOVE his ear flop. What a cute little dude :)
 

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also maybe leave on a tv, radio, something with some soothing music:)
 

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Thank you for the responses I feel better now. Today is a new day, will give it a try again today :) Wish us luck!
 

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I echo everything the previous posters have said. Our pup is 8 weeks old (we've had her since 6 weeks old) and she still cries when we crate her, but it is getting less and less. It helps to play music and put a sheet over the crate so it feels more like a den to them. She doesn't hate her crate, she just hates being away from us. They get over it, eventually :)
 

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Don't forget to keep playing crate games with her when you don't intend to leave her. I spent 5-7 minutes several times a day getting my puppy into the crate and settled, treating and praising, closing the door and then releasing. It didn't take long before he started going to the crate by himself to see if he'd get a treat (which he did for a while).

Also consider feeding in the crate with the door closed. I think the idea is to make it a happy place and not a prison. Also, with using the crate at different times for different things I think they learn to not fear the abandonment since you might be back in minutes instead of hours.

I got Ridley when he was 9 months so he was slightly more mature and already knew platz and sit but he didn't want to have anything to do with the crate! Now he goes in and out with no problems and no drama. He knows that I won't open the door until he's sitting or down and quiet. He still gets excited when he knows he's coming out but I ignore him (back turned) until he settles. This took longer for him to learn but it's worth it. Our last male could knock me down trying to come out of the crate or through an opening door so I decided to train better manners with this one!

I definately agree about removing stuff that the puppy can swallow. We had no idea how much fabric a dog can swallow until our first GSD consumed an entire athletic sock - the long ones (this was a LONG time ago!). We were luck that there was no medical emergency - but it made for an interesting morning for my husband during the morning outing . . . I'll just leave it at that!
 

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Crate update....still uncontrollble barking and crying while in crate. Even when Bandit is out of the crate if for some rare reason he does not see me leave the room he starts crying and running all over looking for me....
 

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Keep doing what Emoore suggested and you should get results. Sounds like he needs to get tired out. I know it's brutally cold there my brother lives in Colchester] but if he's tired enough he'll settle down. I'd try a flirt pole, tug, roll a ball down the hall, stuff like that if you can't be outside for too long. It sounds like a good time to start clicker training or NILIF with him. He is gorgeous by the way
 

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What everyone has said are good suggestions.

But also, he obviously feels very strongly about you and is very attached. You should also do a lot of short crate stays with him to help him realize that every time he is in there with the door closed is not going to be forever and you're not going to abandon him. Get him some kongs (or similar toys) and stuff them with peanut butter and kibble and freeze them (or canned dog food, frozen--or something similar)--give those to him for his crate time when you are around or when you have to leave.

When you come back to him, do not open the door while he is fussing. Put your hand on the door and wait him out. My rule is "four on the floor" (preferably a sit) before that door is opened.

You can even "refuse" to approach the crate if he's having a fit. I'll stand in the room and turn my back when I'm barked at, when it's quiet, I'll turn and take a step toward the crate, when I'm barked at again, I'll turn my back again--and if it keeps up, I'll take a step away. This, as you can imagine, sometimes can take a while, but it does send a clear message that the fussing/barking/scratching behavior does not bring you closer to opening that door.

If you google "crate games for puppies" you can find a lot of info and suggestions and even youtube videos.
 

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Here is my 2 cents, Stella far from loves the crate but is very quiet in it, a few yelps in the begining and then no noise. We have put her in from the get go 7 1/2 weeks, but in her crate with her is a dirtyT Shirt that smells like mommy, one toy no food or water, we leave the TV on and she is quiet. Now this is way different than my doie Ralph, if it was in her crate she tore it up, if it was too close to her crate she would drag it in and tear ir it up, lots of complaining but eventually she would go in as soon as she saw we were leaving or with just one word "in", I guess just keep on trying your baby will get used to it. we put Stella in on the weekends for a few hours while house work is getting done and she is very quiet. It will get better each day for sure.
For nighttime Stella is in a playpen until she is ready for a doggie bed or can get out of the playpen, this works well for her also.

Good Luck
 

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I know with Sasha we placed a rag that had her mothers scent on it in her crate. She had it in there for a couple of weeks. Did fine. Also where is your crate located at? Your bedroom, family room?

You may try moving her to where you sleep to see how that works.
 

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Oh man, I had an insane time with my girl, for well over a month! Believe me, I know what your going through!!!

However I did just as these people are telling you. I would do short crate times throughout the day, starting where she could see me, sometimes not, if I had to take a shower or run somewhere and didn't want to take her with me. I would use treats going into the crate in the beginning. Also she wasn't allowed out until she was quiet and in a sit position. I also started feeding her in her crate with the door shut, just as has been suggested already. If she does something wrong, she never goes into the crate, that is strictly for a relaxing time or bed time thing.

Believe me, there are post on here where I was absolutely loosing my mind! However after a little over a month or so, it finally broke. Now, when it's bedtime I put her kong in her crate and tell her to go in. She goes in, sets or lays down and thats that. If she does a little breathless whine or anything I pay no attention to her. Oh, I also had to end up moving her crate into my bedroom about 3 feet from my bed. In the morning, I get up, walk past her, and do my morning ritual, when ready I go back to her crate, open the door, tell her to sit and stay until I release her and that's that. Also sometimes when feeding her, I'll leave her in her crate when done for another 10 minutes or so. Usually I hear nothing from her at all.

And with the whole attachment thing. My girl has to be within eye sight of me almost always! And when I go into the restroom, she is always right there. Thankfully she goes to the other end of the room and lays down. lol
However I've now caught her drinking out of the toilet!!!! LOL SO, it's down with the lid. Also, if I go outside to start the jeep and leave her in the house more than 5 minutes, she's usually upstairs looking for something to eat, for some reason she keeps finding little sticks up stairs, and I have no flipping idea where's she getting them from! lol

Good luck, and be strong, it will take time, believe me , but when it happens, you'll more than likely not even realize it until some time later.
 

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Susan Garrett has a great DVD out "Crate Games" It could be helpful. Gives the crate value in the dog's mind. I had a similar problem, but not as severe as you describe. Now she will zoom into her crate, she will protest when I leave but settles after a few mins.
Good Luck.
 

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hehe- does the beginning of this video look familiar? Trauma 8 weeks to 4 months on Vimeo

Trauma would try and scream/eat his way out of the crate when he first arrived. He is the worst I had ever experienced in regards to the crate. We finally put him in a spare room and shut the door. As soon as he was quiet, we would go in, praise, and let him out. If he started to freak/scream when we went in to let him out all we did was quietly turn and leave. I would say it took him about a month of that consistently.

I agree with everyone on Crate Games and Blackthorn on not letting him out when he is causing a ruckus. My newest girl is not bad in the crate but leaps, digs, and pounds the door when I go to let her out. Now she has learned that I will just stand there with my hand on the door until she puts her butt on the ground and her feet off the door. It took patience and being willing to stand in that spot for over 4 minutes sometimes but it paid off. She now sits immediately to come out.

I know some feel otherwise but I ALWAYS feed my puppies in their crates. My guys love to eat and they know the food always comes in the crate. All of my dogs, and now our new addition, fly into their crate/run with complete enthusiasm and excitement when the bowls come out. I really think for food motivated dogs, feeding in the crate only builds more acceptance and enjoyment. If everything good always happened outside of the crate and never inside, why would they ever want to go in there??
 

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just to clarify also...I don't leave food constantly in the crate. My puppy gets fed twice a day AM and PM. She never leaves food left over. However, I always put a 10 minute rule on feeding for my dogs. If they decide to sit and scream or do other things instead of eat, the food is removed after that time frame. Normally this only happens once or twice as babies and they eat every single time afterward.
 

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Susan Garrett has a great DVD out "Crate Games" It could be helpful. Gives the crate value in the dog's mind. I had a similar problem, but not as severe as you describe. Now she will zoom into her crate, she will protest when I leave but settles after a few mins.
Good Luck.
I also recommend that video. http://www.cleanrun.com/index.cfm?fuseaction=product.display&Product_ID=1363&ParentCat=215

And I KNOW you aren't crating the pup with you in the bedroom at night? Or you'd be never getting any sleep. This is an IDEAL way to teach that the crate is fine, I am RIGHT HERE and can dangle my hand in your crate. And you need to knock it off sweetheartIloveyoubutIneedsomesleep. If you are 'correcting' with a rap on the crate (good dog when the quiet) then you have PERFECT timing, which you will never have to teach when you are out of the room or house.

Other thing, is I'd say that you generally aren't exercising your pup enough. You may be doing it alot. But I'm thinking not ENOUGH for your pup at this age. This is what I have to do so if it gives you a better mental picture of how much exercise a puppy can get, that will help:

 
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