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Standing around the corner on the busy street talking to a business owner about a problem....I hear to the South of me... every dog in the neighborhood seemingly raising bloody el....

We continue talking and I stop them because of the dogs all over the neighborhood raising heck. It sounds like one dog has been hit by a car (not unusual for the flood of tourists into our small neighborhood...

I stop the conversation and say something's going on and walk to the corner and a pure coyote is booking it down the sidewalk 20 feet away.

There are no coyotes here... in the 33 years I've lived here, there's never been one...ONE.... 5 miles out the city we have Elk/Moose and Wolves - wolves would never allow coyotes- they kill them because of the hiarchy of the food chain. Coyotes have never been in a 200 mile radius of this area... It's big game, heavy timber and wolves.....:surprise:

This was a wild pure - not someone's attempt to make a pet....

It was during late afternoon - it flew by but looked not skinny, coat looked healthy, standard weight & height for a Northern Coyote. Two highway patrol came by bisecting our street and cross street about 10 minutes later... like right - that animal was flying.... AC only works M-F here, so it's a shoot on site weekends for the cops.

The coyote looked extremely healthy, no confusion, booking toward the lake 4 blocks away... I hope he made it. But, also there's a huge concern- rabies.... but he looked so healthy and was running flat out.... I just feel bad for him:frown2::frown2:
 

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Coyotes are in downtown Chicago and that is a major city, so they can be anywhere. They travel and coyotes have mated with Wolves so that isn't impossible either. I remember the first coyote we seen many years ago, shocked us. It turns out they were there for a while and nobody knew, then the coyote population went up dramatically.
 

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Lol! I just got home and called the police non emergency # and asked them about the conclusion (their action) about the coyote running down our main street. She checked the call log twice and no one had reported it.

I've lived here for 33 years in this city and not one report but she said that that would be a Fish & Game call and they would not handle it... So I called the F & G # and they referred to the State Police... F & G is only open M-F-9-5 as is animal control. ....

So out of curiousity I call the state police #. Get a young sounding woman that says "It's a common problem this time of year mam... they get thirsty and come down for water"... LOL! This is the big woods in the rocky mountain chain where hunters and anyone else that ventures 5 miles outside of town is going to be soaking from rain and muddy muck! We still have snowpack and freezing ground 4 miles outside of town!

So, she was as short and curt as any ISP can be. So I said "Mam, you might familiarize yourself here with your woods and climate before you say they're running out of the woods because they're "thirsty".

IF there are a few coyotes here and the Northern forest variety runs about 40lbs and this one was.... and if suddenly you see one running in daylight down your main street (which everyone gathered and said wth lived here all there lives and never seen that.... wouldn't you be concerned about rabies? which we have turn up here in 6-8 cases per year in the city (in bats - cat or dog brings home).??? None of these agencies I called to ask about response did anything..... amazing.

So tomorrow - it's a letter to the newspaper and they will have a free for all with this....
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Coyotes are in downtown Chicago and that is a major city, so they can be anywhere. They travel and coyotes have mated with Wolves so that isn't impossible either. I remember the first coyote we seen many years ago, shocked us. It turns out they were there for a while and nobody knew, then the coyote population went up dramatically.
I grew up in San Diego and I am very familar with "Urban Coyotes", however, this is a different environment. We are in a large game, Elk, Moose environment - very rugged terrain and heavily forested. The wolves are prevalent starting 4 miles outside our small city limits and wolves quickly eliminate any coyotes that may have been here...

For our unique area - coyotes are unheard of. There's Elk, Moose, Grizzly and Wolves just outside our city limits - we have this little patch of city that runs maybe 2 miles in any direction - the rest for miles is wild forest - the next cities are 30 miles+ away from us.

I have had bald eagles in my back yard, bears in a tree at the downtown banks, moose on a regular basis thru neighborhoods, heard wolves howl in the surrounding hills at night while sitting on my porch.... never coyotes in the surrounding area or in town.????
 

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There is many occasions that they can learn to live together. Coyotes eat foxes and they co-exist.


This no coyote-most likely a coyote/wolf. They decided to mate instead of kill each other. This is broad daylight in a residential area. I had another picture of it walking down from yard to yard. I see coyotes during the day all the time. On a windy day they are in a field chasing leaves like a puppy eood. On occasion they are stalking geese.

 

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There is many occasions that they can learn to live together. Coyotes eat foxes and they co-exist.


This no coyote-most likely a coyote/wolf. They decided to mate instead of kill each other. This is broad daylight in a residential area. I had another picture of it walking down from yard to yard. I see coyotes during the day all the time. On a windy day they are in a field chasing leaves like a puppy eood. On occasion they are stalking geese.Quote/

I can see us not previously having coyote populations - but we may now. They've always been 100 or so miles South of us out on the plains. Now that you mentioned Geese - we didn't used to have them either until 6 or 7 years ago. They'd fly over and briefly stop on their migration South, but now we have a huge resident population. We also have squirrels everywhere and for 50 years had none. Several Bald Eagle pairs have also stayed year round and are not migrating further South.

So it very well could be the Geese (easy pickings) that's brought the coyote's up from the South. Thank You for your post - I think you just solved the mystery:smile2:
 

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A very interesting Nature show (Nature is the name of the program) is the one called Coy Wolf. Would unlikely be Idaho coyotes but some of the night filming is very interesting. They are out there for sure. The show is on netflix and maybe youtube.
 

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If one was out in the open, in broad daylight in a populated area, when people were active, I would be very concerned about rabies. It's not normal behavior for them. I sometimes saw them in Los Angeles in the streets in the wee hours of the AM, or just after dusk, but they are secretive and avoid confrontation.

The only coyotes I've seen active in the daylight interacting with people are the ones in Yellowstone. I've got a large format print of a photo I took of a male coyote who came up and investigated our group, to see if we'd hand over some food, while we were watching wolves in our field scopes in the park in winter. We made a lot of noise to scare him off, so he wouldn't think humans are safe. He was just being curious. The park coyotes aren't as secretive as the urban coyotes, but they do coexist with the wolf packs in Lamar Valley.
 

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There is many occasions that they can learn to live together. Coyotes eat foxes and they co-exist.


This no coyote-most likely a coyote/wolf. They decided to mate instead of kill each other. This is broad daylight in a residential area. I had another picture of it walking down from yard to yard. I see coyotes during the day all the time. On a windy day they are in a field chasing leaves like a puppy eood. On occasion they are stalking geese.Quote/

I can see us not previously having coyote populations - but we may now. They've always been 100 or so miles South of us out on the plains. Now that you mentioned Geese - we didn't used to have them either until 6 or 7 years ago. They'd fly over and briefly stop on their migration South, but now we have a huge resident population. We also have squirrels everywhere and for 50 years had none. Several Bald Eagle pairs have also stayed year round and are not migrating further South.

So it very well could be the Geese (easy pickings) that's brought the coyote's up from the South. Thank You for your post - I think you just solved the mystery:smile2:
I think animals adapt to wherever there is food. Eagles used to come here as a stop over in late Jan or so. Now they are here permanently and are spotted everywhere.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
If one was out in the open, in broad daylight in a populated area, when people were active, I would be very concerned about rabies. It's not normal behavior for them. I sometimes saw them in Los Angeles in the streets in the wee hours of the AM, or just after dusk, but they are secretive and avoid confrontation.

The only coyotes I've seen active in the daylight interacting with people are the ones in Yellowstone.
I am a bit concerned because it's something to be aware of that we have not known about. Hard to deny when you see it right in front of your face. Something happened with this coyote before he came into my view. There was a great commotion with dogs barking to the North up the street and vocalization of what sounded like maybe a dog got hit by a car and was crying.. In hindsight it was the coyote being very vocal. Then all the dogs to the south started raising a racket way before the coyote even got close to their area. There were no stray dogs and the streets and outdoor seating areas had lots of people.

I was around the corner talking to the owner of a restaurant and said hold on - something's going on around the corner. Right when I got to the corner the coyote came blowing by at full speed down the sidewalk on the opposite side of the street. He looked splendidly
healthy - really a beautifully conditioned animal.. you would expect them to look pretty mottley this time of year with coat blow. Not this guy.

Very glad I keep my girl in the house when I'm away. I do worry for the coyote though - if he made it thru all the traffic and down to the lake 4 blocks South he had a very good chance of getting back into the woods very quickly and out of harms way. That's one that I don't think will be back this way.....
 

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Have you ever heard the cry of an animal getting killed by a coyote? Bone chilling. So maybe the coyote killed something and then was scared off, maybe by a bigger predator which would explain him running like the wind.
 

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Have you ever heard the cry of an animal getting killed by a coyote? Bone chilling. So maybe the coyote killed something and then was scared off, maybe by a bigger predator which would explain him running like the wind.
Yes I have and it's something I'll never get out of my mind.:crying: We hauled a travel trailer to Yosemite Park only to find it booked to the max when we arrived. My husband took us into the high country and we found a pull over by the side of a meadow in the middle of nowhere. Apparently in the dead of night a pack of coyotes had brought down a deer in the meadow and what we heard in the next 1/2 hour from all the coyotes and deer was pretty shocking.

What ever skirmish this coyote was in though would have taken place very close to where I was with all the people around but yet no report of an injured animal and no signs of blood on the coyote. If very well could have been in a neighboring backyard though and gotten itself cornered for a time by a large dog.
 

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Sounds like any normal neighborhood in the West to me. As long as they run, I am fine with their presence. We have them around our house; never see or hear them but they are video taped on the motion detecting cameras we have around the property. We often see a youngster on the pictures who could use some worm treatment. Feel sorry for him/her. But I will resist the temptation to put out meat with a wormer in it.
 

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I've learned a little more. Found an old article about 8 small dogs killed by a coyote pair that had moved into an empty field northwest of town.

The F & G officer said in the article that in the 24 years he had been here he had never heard of coyotes in the area. This was an old 2010 article and apparently no problems since. But, he also said that Wash State passed a no trapping coyote law recently and we are only 18 miles from the border. They are seeing an influx from coyotes from that direction (the farm lands). He also stated that coyotes can travel 30 miles per day in their search for food so it's likely to become a problem here.

At that time F & G said their policy is to do nothing. They do not have the expertise to trap and would be concerned for harm to neighbor dogs if they were to try to trap. In addition,our police department will take no action because it's a F & G issue. F & G says the burden is on the property owner to control just as they would if a skunk or raccoon got under their house. Call the pest control company....

Maybe we'll get lucky and this is another fluke or maybe we'll just have to learn to live with them like most other areas. It's just strange because it has not been a problem here for so long. If yesterday was a "grand reveal" to show that they are coming - sure was a good job. Glad I do not own a leetle dog:surprise:

Are there precautions I should take though? Sometimes I let my dog out back late at night or before daylight to go potty - she's a big girl but???
 

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Little dogs and cats are not safe. They will grab a little dog here with the owner right there. There have been cases where they will go up against 1-2 bigger dogs if they are really hungry. I never leave my senior dog outside alone because she is vulnerable. I also do not walk my dogs at night. When Brennan had his FHO we never left the yard, because he was vulnerable.

In this picture there was a pack of coyotes coming our way. You could hear them--right after I took the picture I made all the dogs come in.

 

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We've had plenty of them just down the road from you living in Spokane. They've been here for a long time, I recall passing them while doing my paper route as a teenager (80's). I'd bet you have more in your area than you realise. It always pays to be mindful of the potential for rabies, but there could be other reasons the one you saw was out and about during the day, he/she may have a den nearby and by chance was discovered or it may have been trapped in someone's garage, who knows??
 

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We've had plenty of them just down the road from you living in Spokane. They've been here for a long time, I recall passing them while doing my paper route as a teenager (80's). I'd bet you have more in your area than you realise. It always pays to be mindful of the potential for rabies, but there could be other reasons the one you saw was out and about during the day, he/she may have a den nearby and by chance was discovered or it may have been trapped in someone's garage, who knows??
No doubt Nigel - and that F & G guy pointed the finger at your state for banning trapping on coyotes as a likely source...It's an old article, but is that true??
 

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If you research it, you'll find that putting pressure on a coyote population with trapping and hunting actually do nothing to reduce their numbers. The coyotes have built-in mechanisms to increase litter size and the number of litters to adjust.

I think it is better to haze coyotes to avoid humans and pets than kill them as a more effective long term solution. Killing the ones that are caught in the act or that a landowner wants to eliminate is fine. But wide-spread trapping and poisoning by the gov't is not only ineffective but inhumane and kills many non-target animals.
 

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People here coyotes all the time around me, and I don't. I think my dogs kind of deter them. We did have a black bear up in town, climbed a tree and was there for a couple of days.

I've seen a coyote or grey fox once while driving, it was dusk and I couldn't be sure. I've seen red fox too. No wolves. We don't have wolves. They maybe would knock down the deer population.
 

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If you research it, you'll find that putting pressure on a coyote population with trapping and hunting actually do nothing to reduce their numbers. The coyotes have built-in mechanisms to increase litter size and the number of litters to adjust.

I think it is better to haze coyotes to avoid humans and pets than kill them as a more effective long term solution. Killing the ones that are caught in the act or that a landowner wants to eliminate is fine. But wide-spread trapping and poisoning by the gov't is not only ineffective but inhumane and kills many non-target animals.
No doubt. I don't condone trapping in any way. It is a curiosity though that Wa would do this. How do you haze an animal that travels up to 30 miles in a night and where they find food is where they stop?
 
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