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When we eradicate predators like coyotes we cause explosions in rodent populations and hasten the spread of disease and the destruction of vital grasslands.
Especially as a hunter it is vital that you respect the need for these wonderfully adaptable animals.
I'm sorry for your kitties but for the animals it is not personal. It's just nature.
Oh i agree its nature, but less of them in my area means more bunnies and deer for me to fill my and my family's belly. as for the rodents, that's why i have kitties. :) I have just seen what happens when these things are not kept in check. Not to mention these animals are very smart and are not easy to shoot
 

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When we eradicate predators like coyotes we cause explosions in rodent populations and hasten the spread of disease and the destruction of vital grasslands.
Especially as a hunter it is vital that you respect the need for these wonderfully adaptable animals.
I'm sorry for your kitties but for the animals it is not personal. It's just nature.
I believe in keeping the populations in check if possible and keeping a healthy dose of fear of humans in them. Keeps them and us safer. We had one area the coyotes got so overpopulated all we were finding were dead fawn carcasses and nearly zero deer, we didn't bother hunting there since the numbers were so low. The ranch owners got together and had a pretty big coyote hunt inviting people out and really reduced the population and now the deer are a bit higher back out there.

Although yes it can be tricky since reducing numbers can increase litter sizes. But keeping hunting events seems to be pretty successful in keeping numbers lower as long as they're regular and not intermittent and helps keep coyotes away from houses and such.
 

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Let's all just agree to disagree. Some of us have come from different lifestyles/ways of life and have different view points on this particular issue. :)
 

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We all have different perspectives and experiences.That's what makes for an interesting discussion.Animal behavior is endlessly fascinating. :giggle:
 

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It’s my upstate house, it’s in the Catskills in NY
The northeast is also experiencing a rapid growth of coywolf populations. Canadian wolves are coming down and breeding with coyotes. Think larger coyote/small wolf that isn't as afraid of man.
 

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The northeast is also experiencing a rapid growth of coywolf populations. Canadian wolves are coming down and breeding with coyotes. Think larger coyote/small wolf that isn't as afraid of man.
Coywolves are a direct result of human interference. We have only ourselves to blame for that particular issue.
People need to understand that as we decimate natural areas in order to build, we displace and disrupt animal populations. Humans have forced cross breeding by skewing natural populations, the argument of predators overkilling in invalid. WE cause the imbalance, not them. Without prey there are no predators, and coyotes are not really into big game. Pastures, crops, roads and housing change patterns and decrease habitat. Of course deer will inhabit areas devoid of predators, and then we complain about deer destroying crops, orchards and gardens justifying the need to hunt them. Its a vicious circle.
The whole concept of "I want to live in the woods, but please dispose of the wildlife" disturbs and confuses me.
Yes we all have different views and opinions, I can respect that without understanding it. All life has value and the coyote is no less important then I am. I have had issues and run ins with them over the years, but still respect them as beautiful, adaptable inhabitants of the planet. They are highly intelligent and while I am in favor of hazing to keep the peace I believe they could teach us a thing or two about acceptance.
 

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Coyotes have front upper leg joints that are below their bodies. German Shepherd joints are above the bottom edge of the body line. I read that somewhere and can’t find it now, but I have also noticed it by looking at dogs and at pictures of coyotes.
 

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Coyotes have front upper leg joints that are below their bodies. German Shepherd joints are above the bottom edge of the body line. I read that somewhere and can’t find it now, but I have also noticed it by looking at dogs and at pictures of coyotes.
Here's an article talking about that..



Looking at the photo it's elbows are definitely below the body line.
 
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