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So what's the prognosis for a WL pup with cow hocks? Other than that, the structure looks pretty good and the pup is a pistol.
 

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Prognosis?? Wait a bit, let them grow and get more muscle and see if it affects gait.
 

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So what's the prognosis for a WL pup with cow hocks? Other than that, the structure looks pretty good and the pup is a pistol.
I wouldn't worry about it. I've had pups who's back legs were like wet spaghetti, then they grew up and jumped 6 foot fences. Just make sure they don't jump off any high surfaces and don't play on hard surfaces for the first 6-8 months or so. Light play sessions on grass strengthens their legs. You can't judge their hips until they are a year old by x-ray.
 

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I wouldn't worry about it. I've had pups who's back legs were like wet spaghetti, then they grew up and jumped 6 foot fences. Just make sure they don't jump off any high surfaces and don't play on hard surfaces for the first 6-8 months or so. Light play sessions on grass strengthens their legs. You can't judge their hips until they are a year old by x-ray.

Cow hocked has to do with rear angulation, especially significant or extreme rear angulation, not hip dysplasia.
 

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Cow hocked is when the hocks turn in toward each other.
Yes, I know. But it's wrong to automatically assume it's due to hip dysplasia. More often it's due to more significant angulation to the rear. It should be watched and monitored, but not assumed it's HD causing it. In dogs with extreme angulation and in the 'galumpy' stage, you will often see cow hocked legs.
 

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Yes, I know. But it's wrong to automatically assume it's due to hip dysplasia. More often it's due to more significant angulation to the rear. It should be watched and monitored, but not assumed it's HD causing it. In dogs with extreme angulation and in the 'galumpy' stage, you will often see cow hocked legs.
According to experts it has nothing to do with hd.
And in my experience not much to do with angulation.
Not sure about dogs but unless its severe in horses it has no impact on gait.
 

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If you watch some SL german shepherd puppies or those with significant angulation you will often see loose hocks or cow hocks as they move away from you, or even standing, especially in the galumpy stage where they don't seem to have full control and legs are just going all over.
 
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