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Fighting it to turn her head. She is very active and alert. She can walk one direction with her head swiveled to look behind her. The more she felt her head was constrained the more she fought it and she would not calm down. This was after a lesson using it in someone’s yard. It did not work on a walk. This is the same dog who went into drive, jerked the leash unexpectedly, knocked me off balance and I had a broken bone.
What a lot of people don't realize is that the Halti, just like the prong, a muzzle or e collar must be conditioned just the same.
 
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I learned the same method from an ex military handler who is now my trainer when I need one. Dogtra collar, low stim, only as needed.
I am not against appropriate use of prongs or e collars. I am just shocked at the resistance to such a powerful tool as the Halti especially among women or the elderly when outmatched by a dog's strength or determination.
 
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Different perspective on head collars. https://www.nitrocanine.com/blog/2015/02/10/the-head-halter-torture-pain-and-nonsense-explained/. Not sure if the link worked.

When I was directed, by people on this forum, to a particular Schutzhund trainer in this area, and I showed up on the first day, the second words out of their mouth were, "get a prong collar."
On the dead ring, hooked to both, where I use it a lot of the time, it does not impart much of a sharp correction.

Not harshing on the e-collars, and admittedly, I have not used one. But most of the yelps I hear out of dogs at training are when they get a jolt.

I don't use the prong as a substitute for training, and if anything, the trainers I've worked with have suggested I am too soft with it, even when I have it on the single ring.

When I'm just out for a walk, not looking to do any close heeling, I put the Sprenger prong on the dead ring combo, and the end result is a dog walking with a sufficiently slack lead to suit me.
I am not being pulled along like a self propelled lawnmower, but on the other hand the leash is not dragging the ground, either.
 

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I screwed the e collar with Punk. Even with Lou constantly advising. To this day if I pull it out and put it on her she simply stays glued to me. There seems no negative association, she is pleased as punch with herself.
I believe they are an incredible tool. I simply underestimated my dog. She is both softer and smarter then I gave her credit for.
The halti was a fabulous tool, unless you have a dog that fights. It made sense to the horsey me. But, on a type of dog that will submit to guidance.
The no pull harnesses I don't like. The most common design alters a dogs natural movement. And they are only really useful on some body types. Shadow slips out of them.
I would like prongs better if owners would stop relying on them. But as I said, most put them on and stop pretending to train.
 

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I screwed the e collar with Punk. Even with Lou constantly advising. To this day if I pull it out and put it on her she simply stays glued to me. There seems no negative association, she is pleased as punch with herself.
I believe they are an incredible tool. I simply underestimated my dog. She is both softer and smarter then I gave her credit for.
The halti was a fabulous tool, unless you have a dog that fights. It made sense to the horsey me. But, on a type of dog that will submit to guidance.
The no pull harnesses I don't like. The most common design alters a dogs natural movement. And they are only really useful on some body types. Shadow slips out of them.
I would like prongs better if owners would stop relying on them. But as I said, most put them on and stop pretending to train.
The bold, that is where my experience differs. I have only used the Halti on one dog in my life and mainly for control until both of us had the learning and training under our belts to advance. He powered through prongs and e collars as if they weren't even there. I would not hesitate to use it again and, obviously, to advise it.

After that, for strong dogs that may have control issues, it's a dominant dog collar. Everything else is done on a flat collar.
 

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I am not against appropriate use of prongs or e collars. I am just shocked at the resistance to such a powerful tool as the Halti especially among women or the elderly when outmatched by a dog's strength or determination.
I’m not going to force my dog to be conditioned to something she so clearly hates. This wasn’t just getting used to it, it goes against her ability to enjoy herself. So what is the point of training her to use something she hates when I have an alternative? Think they are dangerous and nothing in my experience has shown me they aren’t.
 

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The Gentle Leader pivots the entire weight of a pulling dog on its nose. The pressure of that weight forces the dog’s head to turn. It’s called torque and it hurts.
Also, the company says that there’s pressure transferred to the back of the neck, but a simple look at where the lead attaches demonstrates this isn’t true. It’s all on the nose.

Also, the company says that there’s pressure transferred to the back of the neck, but a simple look at where the lead attaches demonstrates this isn’t true. It’s all on the nose.
Imagine a 50-pound dog running forward, hitting the end of a leash and having its neck snapped around. We’re talking serious damage. Even on a slower walk, hitting the end of the leash is painful.

So yes, it works. Dogs don’t pull because they know that it will hurt like the dickens if they do. Gentle Leader calls it “power steering.” The handler doesn’t have to do anything because the halter does it for them.

(Do you see why I hate this company so much? It preys on people and their fears of being bad dog owners. People read this and are deceived into thinking that it’s a more “humane” choice than training with a prong collar which, let’s just get the facts straight, does not choke a dog.)
 

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I’m not going to force my dog to be conditioned to something she so clearly hates. This wasn’t just getting used to it, it goes against her ability to enjoy herself. So what is the point of training her to use something she hates when I have an alternative? Think they are dangerous and nothing in my experience has shown me they aren’t.
I don't know. Maybe because dogs hate prong collars? Prongs do work by causing discomfort or pain.
 

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Also, the company says that there’s pressure transferred to the back of the neck, but a simple look at where the lead attaches demonstrates this isn’t true. It’s all on the nose.

Also, the company says that there’s pressure transferred to the back of the neck, but a simple look at where the lead attaches demonstrates this isn’t true. It’s all on the nose.
Imagine a 50-pound dog running forward, hitting the end of a leash and having its neck snapped around. We’re talking serious damage. Even on a slower walk, hitting the end of the leash is painful.

So yes, it works. Dogs don’t pull because they know that it will hurt like the dickens if they do. Gentle Leader calls it “power steering.” The handler doesn’t have to do anything because the halter does it for them.

(Do you see why I hate this company so much? It preys on people and their fears of being bad dog owners. People read this and are deceived into thinking that it’s a more “humane” choice than training with a prong collar which, let’s just get the facts straight, does not choke a dog.)
I am talking Haltis, not Gentle Leaders. Anyhow, why would anyone allow a 50# dog to run and hit the end of a lead regardless of what tool is used? The heck with the dog. Imagine what that would do to the human's shoulder!!! I am not that big or strong enough of a person to permit a 50#, let alone a 95# dog, hit the end of a leash while attached to my arm. That is not my idea of control.
 

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The bold, that is where my experience differs. I have only used the Halti on one dog in my life and mainly for control until both of us had the learning and training under our belts to advance. He powered through prongs and e collars as if they weren't even there. I would not hesitate to use it again and, obviously, to advise it.

After that, for strong dogs that may have control issues, it's a dominant dog collar. Everything else is done on a flat collar.
In general, I am inclined to agree. But I am sort of firmly in the " training not equipment" category.
Pre-Shadow most of my trials with equipment had been for the purpose of assessment. To help other people who may have dogs that overpowered them, just by virtue of size.
 

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In general, I am inclined to agree. But I am sort of firmly in the " training not equipment" category.
Pre-Shadow most of my trials with equipment had been for the purpose of assessment. To help other people who may have dogs that overpowered them, just by virtue of size.
Sometimes you need to find the right tool for the dog in front of you for management and control until the training can begin or have an impact.

A friend of mine does board and trains and also does workshops. He has had numerous people of lesser physical stature or age come in with medium to large, out of control dogs on prongs. The first thing he does is puts a Halti on the dog. He says the immediate difference in control vs the prong is night and day and now that the control issue is out of the way, the training can begin.
 

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As I said, I like haltis. I believe that they are a great tool.
And I agree that the immediate change is notable. Dane owners use them a ton.
On dogs that throw acrobatic displays they can be harmful. On breeds that will try and muscle through they can get scary. But most dogs are not inclined to go to those extremes.
 

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Different perspective on head collars. The Head Halter- Torture & Pain and This Nonsense explained. - Nitro K-9 LLC. Not sure if the link worked.

When I was directed, by people on this forum, to a particular Schutzhund trainer in this area, and I showed up on the first day, the second words out of their mouth were, "get a prong collar."
On the dead ring, hooked to both, where I use it a lot of the time, it does not impart much of a sharp correction.

Not harshing on the e-collars, and admittedly, I have not used one. But most of the yelps I hear out of dogs at training are when they get a jolt.

I don't use the prong as a substitute for training, and if anything, the trainers I've worked with have suggested I am too soft with it, even when I have it on the single ring.

When I'm just out for a walk, not looking to do any close heeling, I put the Sprenger prong on the dead ring combo, and the end result is a dog walking with a sufficiently slack lead to suit me.
I am not being pulled along like a self propelled lawnmower, but on the other hand the leash is not dragging the ground, either.
I read the article. An article on prongs, pain and yank and crank could easily be written to counter. A tool should not be faulted for the abuse that results from its misuse. That's like banning prongs and ecollars because some people, (a lot of people), don't know how to use them.
 
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OK. Give me a citation and I'll read it. And in the above quoted section, I believe I said e-collars caused most of the yelps I've heard.

I took the point of the article to be that even when USED AS DESIGNED, NAY, ESPECIALLY WHEN USED AS DESIGNED, the head halter is abusive. I don't claim to be a mechanical or any other type of engineer, although in my line of work I sometimes deal with their screw ups. But here's my layperson's perspective on the head halter vs. the prong. The prong (or a Martingale) applies pressure at the neck, and in many, not all circumstances of use, gradually increases that pressure in response to pulling, or, as to the prong when used to correct, does so in a short pop applied directly to the fairly strong neck area. By contrast, the writer's point seems to be that the head halter transfers the point of control out to the head itself, which ultimately transfers the applied torque to the neck area in a way the writer, and he/she says, the dogs find objectionable and he/she the writer, finds abusive. Maybe for a person who is a little infirm or just not as physically strong as they were at say, age 21, and on the right dog, a head halter might be a defensible choice. Of course, it might also be true that at the far spectrum of being infirm, a high drive dog that is 65 ## or more of solid muscle might not be a wise choice for a lot of people.

I don't say the training sessions I go to, or the guest trainers they sometimes bring in are the end all and be all. I try to pick up what I can from them, though, and I have never seen them use or heard them recommend the head halter. Ditto my breeder (or at least one of them), who not only breeds, but also trains dogs for law enforcement. It's strictly prongs and e-collars, and also harnesses in situations where you know they are bound to pull (ragwork, e.g.).

To your point, yeah, someone can absolutely yank and mistreat a dog with a prong collar, a choke chain, a Martingale or even a harness or plain old flat collar.That tendency among some to take out their desire for competition points on their dog's body, or maybe just take out their bad day on their dog's body probably contributed to some dogs coming up the leash after their handlers. More often, it probably results in the dog sucking it up and suffering in silence.

All this gets far afield from the OP.
To the OP, it looks from the photos as if you must be doing something right, and it sounds like you did your due diligence on the previous, apparently irresponsible owner.
Seems to me you have yourself a nice looking dog, and I hope it continues to work out.
 

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Here's a balanced article I found myself on various types of collars, though not GSD specific.


Note the person says they usually prefer the head halter, for whatever reason for most dogs, but they found it to be the worst for their particular puppy of the moment.
And they make the point all dogs are different, different tools for different dogs.

To the OP, again, good luck.
 

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Here's a balanced article I found myself on various types of collars, though not GSD specific.


Note the person says they usually prefer the head halter, for whatever reason for most dogs, but they found it to be the worst for their particular puppy of the moment.
And they make the point all dogs are different, different tools for different dogs.

To the OP, again, good luck.
That's a fantastic and fair article that comes from a place of experience with all of the tools. Thank you for posting it!

I have had different experiences with trainers and methods regarding the Halti and this is something I think is of interest that I have found. I have yet to see any well known trainers or behaviorists that don't recommend or use Haltis as in the posted article. However, I have found that a great many, albeit not all, trainers that specialize in German Shepherds largely don't recommend them. Just speculating here, but there appears to be a bias against the tool and I am not sure why.

Personally, I can't testify as to its efficacy in correcting pulling as I have not used it for that purpose. My experience with the Halti lies strictly with the control and management of the head of a large, aggressive dog in need of training.

Tom Rose liked to use the Halti for control of the head position during training. There must be something to it. ;)
 

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I had one on a BTMBN/Lab x who was animal aggressive. He darted to the right and hit the end of the leash, injuring his neck. It also really freaked him out.

That was 12 years ago. I haven't used one since.

I've managed to accomplish whatever I need with a flat, prong, DD, harness, muzzle and/or e-collar. I am strong enough to handle a powerful dog physically if necessary.
 

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I guess my size coupled with physics forces me to use this tool differently than others. Force = mass x acceleration. I don’t allow for sufficient space to allow a dog to develop acceleration hence rendering Force to be negligible.

Since we have to name a respondent, tag, you are it David. o_O
 

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I guess my size coupled with physics forces me to use this tool differently than others. Force = mass x acceleration. I don’t allow for sufficient space to allow a dog to develop acceleration hence rendering Force to be negligible.

Since we have to name a respondent, tag, you are it David. o_O
I wouldn't call it necessary by any means, just helpful at times :)
 
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