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Moriah,thank you!!!!This is what I was hoping for as a response.Someone with the exact same dilemma!
Yes, but. It doesn't sound like Moriah's dog is reacting out of fear, which to me would make a difference in how I dealt with the behavior.

I've had two pretty leash reactive dogs - Cassidy, who was a temperamental mess with weak nerves, and Keefer, who has always been extremely social. His reactivity was not fear based, it was due to frustration. He'd bark at a dog from a distance, but is totally fine with dogs in his face. And once he gets to meet a dog up close and personal, he's completely cool, hanging out with no further reactions. It's being restrained by a leash and prevented from the greeting that he wants to do that causes his reactions.

Since there is no risk of blowback with Keefer, I can correct him to let him know that's not acceptable behavior. He still sometimes gets excited about approaching dogs, and I need to remind him that he is actually capable of controlling his impulses and doesn't need to act like a butthead. But what works perfectly fine with him is not something I'd have even considered trying with Cassidy. Different dogs, different root causes of the behavior, different approaches. Although he's a big sweet mush of a dog, and very handler sensitive, he's quite resilient to corrections, which is something else that's good to know. He never takes it personally or redirects towards the other dog if I correct him.

Halo is much more neutral towards other dogs, but will sometimes get snarky on leash if the other dog is staring at her and barking and lunging. Since she's got rock solid nerves, I can let her know to knock it off without worrying about negative consequences.
 

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The key to purifying the reason for why a correction happened is discrimination.

A dog will associate a correction with a person if the person enters the picture and the dog gets corrected till the person leaves.

The dog associates the correction with the behavior if the person enters the picture the dog does the behavior then gets corrected till the behavior stops and the person remains in the picture. Its simple discrimination.

You dont correct fear you correct the operant behavior you dont want to see anymore.
correct for disobeying a command, not for reacting. Managing the reactivity is important, proactively give a command so the dog will get corrected if not complying, it'll redirect the dogs attention from what they are reacting to. PRAISE, throw a party with high value reward if the dog needs no correction.
LAT does work as well.
My dog ramped up when she was corrected for her reactivity...it backfired on us, so I used the LAT method and it worked/more clear to her.
Correct the behaviour and not the dog?? Most likely that was explained in the link I could not find?? So thanks, folks!

Have to say.. a lot of acronyms and terms being thrown out here...just saying. :)
 

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Discussion Starter #23
Hey Debbie!Thanks!I'm interested in all different perspectives.I am sort of stuck on how to correct my anxious boy without compounding his anxiety.Got a lot different ways to look at the problem now and I sincerely appreciate all who took the time to help:)
 

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dogma13 - in my experience, a correction to shut down the reaction immediately followed by a behavior modification method ( I used LAT as Jane did) is what worked for me. You can use a correction collar for it but it must be well timed and WITHOUT EMOTION. Do not say a word. You need the dog to associate the correction with the action, not with you or with the person/dog.

With Jax, I used an e-collar. With Seger, when he was young and just being dumb, I used a nylon choker. The difference between the two is that Jax is truly reactive where Seger is stable but was young and dumb so just needed to learn that behavior was not acceptable. If you choose to use a correction collar, I highly advise doing so under the guide of a trainer.
 

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Correct the behaviour and not the dog?? Most likely that was explained in the link I could not find?? So thanks, folks!

Have to say.. a lot of acronyms and terms being thrown out here...just saying. :)
Opps meant to use exclamation points Correct the behaviour and not the dog!!
 

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Update:
Your advice worked like a charm Baillif!Had two opportunities this weekend when he growled at someone making eye contact.A quick leash pop,look at me,treat,then remained in the presence of the other person.He took the correction and chilled right out immediately.Nice!
 

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Fascinating discussion in which @dogma13 , who is now an oldtimer, is learning to work through a reactivity issue.

@Cassidy's Mom makes an interesting point between fear and frustration as a cause of reactivity. I have recently been noting a difference in Ole's reactivity towards some big, calm dogs. His bark is higher pitched and he doesn't go stiff. Going to have to follow up on that next time we are out.
 

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Well,I have to say I learned to substitute a sharp "Eh!" and then give him something else to do that I can praise him for.Keeping him busy and not letting him dwell on what makes him uncomfortable.
 

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Well,I have to say I learned to substitute a sharp "Eh!" and then give him something else to do that I can praise him for.Keeping him busy and not letting him dwell on what makes him uncomfortable.
I try to catch Shadow before she reacts and redirect. Nine years of practice has honed my skills. But I do miss sometimes and it's too late to redirect so I correct and then redirect. I do know that in Shadows case it is fear. Very real fear.
Threads like this one are immensely helpful for newcomers looking for help and for others who need a refresher, new ideas or just to feel less alone.
 

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Exactly!It becomes second nature.Knowing what makes our dogs uncomfortable and being proactive to keep them steady.Samson will be six next month.
 

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@Cassidy's Mom makes an interesting point between fear and frustration as a cause of reactivity. I have recently been noting a difference in Ole's reactivity towards some big, calm dogs. His bark is higher pitched and he doesn't go stiff. Going to have to follow up on that next time we are out.
Wow, old thread! Interesting to see stuff I wrote many years ago, lol. Keefer had a high pitched, whiny, kind of bark, like flushing prey, which sounds like what Ole might be doing as well, not an aggressive bark. And he was super social, almost obsessively friendly, so it was very clear that the root of his reactivity was very different than Cassidy's.
 

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We got a chance to work in the field behind the dog park. We stay outside the fence, but are able to get close enough I could pay attention to Ole's vocalizations towards other dogs.
He showed annoyance towards a pushy beagle.
He showed fear towards a husky that just sat and stared at us. To be honest, this guy's intensity kind of freaked me out too.
He showed excitement/frustration towards a really calm Bernese Mountain Dog. He wanted to go see him.

Interesting changes. He is a much different dog than he was 5 weeks ago.
 
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