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Discussion Starter #1
Ziva weighs 81 lbs (& counting). We've had her 3 months - she came from a Rescue. She's roughly 15-18 mos, for she's still growing.

She jumps up on people. On the doors when she is excited to go out or come in. This am, DH was walking her to his truck & she jumped up on the door. Scratched it.

She does this on-lead or off. Doesn't matter. You turn around to ignore her - doesn't matter. She'll just jump again in 5 minutes. "No", "Off", yelp like a wounded puppy...nothing works.

And it doesn't matter the type of collar, either. She jumps & lunges whether it was a standard choke collar, Gentle Leader, Halti, etc. DH likes the short-pronged collar & THAT'S not working.

And, if she scrathes my camaro, I'm gonna use her tail to wax them out:mad: (just kidding)

Help!

Becky
 

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Dogs jump up when they want something. She wants attention so she jumps on people. She wants to go in or out so she jumps on the door. She wants to get in the car so she jumps on the car.

So, starting today and into eternity, she ONLY gets what she wants if she is SITTING. She wants attention? She has to sit. The minute that butt leaves the floor you ignore. She wants her dinner? She sits. She wants to go outside? She sits. Teach her to sit and wait quietly at doors. She wants to get in the car? She sits quietly by the car.

So, for example, if she's jumping on the door to go out. You stand by the door and tell her to sit. This may take a minute, but eventually she'll get bored or tired and sit down. When she's sitting, you reach for the door. Her butt comes up, you take your hand back and look at her. You reach for the door again. Maybe this time you get it open a crack. Butt comes up, you slam the door again. Repeat this until you can open the door wide and she still sits. I like to teach the "sit, wait" command with this.

Same thing with attention. She wants attention, she sits. The minute she starts to stand up, you ignore. Tell her to sit and when she does you commence petting.

From now on she only gets what she wants if she's sitting. When she's jumping around and acting crazy, just stare at her like she's lost her mind. Eventually she'll get bored and try sitting, then you reward her with whatever it was she wanted.

The only problem you get from this is a dog that won't stop sitting in front of you and you have to figure out what the heck she wants.
 

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This maybe "Ole School" and I may take some heat for it, but one of the reasons the family gave up DJ and brought him to me is because he jumped up on everyone coming into the room. I broke him in one day.
When she jumps up on you, put your knee into her rib cage firm enough to dislodge her. She may do this a couple more times, but I promise this technique works.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Jake - I don't dare grab her front legs, because then Problem #2 would start: after the 2nd trainer had her (before we fired the snot), she came back with this mouthing problem, which hurts.:(

Emmore - I guess we need to start further from the door. Because there's a battle of stubborness. She sits, then gets up. She waits, then lunges. Maybe just keep her further from the door.

But when she's acting like a Wild Child, she completely ignores ANY spoken words. (And I've more than a few!) Boy, as much as I wanted this dog, she's gonna drive me to drink...

What's the best collar to use on this big girl?

Thanks again,
Becky
 

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Emoore's method is one of the ones i highly suggest. Shelby is a jumper as well but she's learning that unless she's sitting and CALM, no dinner. No car rides. no fun. not a darn thing for her until she behaves and if she doesnt behave, into her crate she goes until she's calm and WAITS until the crate door is open and she is released. if for even a second her butt pops up and her head even pokes out of the crate before she's released, the door gets closed until she's sitting and calm again. Persistance. They're smart dogs and will eventually give in because they know if they want something, they have to listen to you. Another method you can try is tether her to you. When you head to the door, the minute she goes to jump thinking she gets what she wants, turn and walk the opposite direction when you get to the door and she's no longer jumping, THEN make her sit and wait and implement Emoore's method.

also if the prong collar isn't properly fitted.... guess what! it wont work. have a trainer help you properly fit the prong and it should help as well. make her work for EVERYTHING she wants.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Stogey - great idea & I've tried it, but guess I'm either not quick enough or firm enough. I also have a temporary colostomy following a battle with cancer last year: I'm fearful of her yanking the bag off (yuck) or causing a hernia...:confused:
 

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I can just about promise she won't be biting or mouthing you if you hold her front feet,,,,,she will cry for you to let go.:)
 

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It is absolutely a battle of stubbornness. The first time I tried this with Cash it took us nearly 30 minutes to get out the door. I'd take a step towards the door and he'd go nuts. I'd stand there and stare at him until he was calm. Take another step, he goes nuts. I stand there and stare until he calms down. Eventually, we got out the door with him being somewhat calm. The next day it took more like 10 minutes. The day after that was 5 minutes. And within a week, he'd figured out that the best way to keep this crazy woman moving was to stay calm.
 

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When ever I have a dog who likes to jump up and refuses to listen to the command of sit etc.
I will grab his front leg’s gently hold them and reach out with my foot and step lightly on their rear foot not to hurt them, they just plain don’t like the feeling of being held up front and touched on the back feet at the same time, it works, doesn’t hurt them, but it has always worked for me.
 

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Dogs jump up when they want something. She wants attention so she jumps on people. She wants to go in or out so she jumps on the door. She wants to get in the car so she jumps on the car.

So, starting today and into eternity, she ONLY gets what she wants if she is SITTING. She wants attention? She has to sit. The minute that butt leaves the floor you ignore. She wants her dinner? She sits. She wants to go outside? She sits. Teach her to sit and wait quietly at doors. She wants to get in the car? She sits quietly by the car.

So, for example, if she's jumping on the door to go out. You stand by the door and tell her to sit. This may take a minute, but eventually she'll get bored or tired and sit down. When she's sitting, you reach for the door. Her butt comes up, you take your hand back and look at her. You reach for the door again. Maybe this time you get it open a crack. Butt comes up, you slam the door again. Repeat this until you can open the door wide and she still sits. I like to teach the "sit, wait" command with this.

Same thing with attention. She wants attention, she sits. The minute she starts to stand up, you ignore. Tell her to sit and when she does you commence petting.

From now on she only gets what she wants if she's sitting. When she's jumping around and acting crazy, just stare at her like she's lost her mind. Eventually she'll get bored and try sitting, then you reward her with whatever it was she wanted.
This is what I do, except that I don't stare at them, I completely ignore them until they calm down - I don't look at them, talk to them, or touch them, I simply wait for the good behavior, say "good dog!" and then continue with what I was about to do. If she jumps up and gets excited again, stop and wait. Practice when you don't really need to go anywhere or you'll be late for work a lot!

You can also add a negative marker (also referred to as a "no reward marker" - in this case the reward is getting to go through that door), such as "oops!". Walk towards the door and if she charges at it, "oops!", turn around and walk away, ignoring her. Wait a minute and try again. After a few tries if she still won't calm down, go into another room, sit on the couch and pick up a book or turn on the TV and pretend she doesn't exist. Wait 10 minutes and try again. Over and over and over again.

As KZoppa suggests, you can do the same thing with the crate. I can now open the dogs' crates in the morning and walk away and they'll stay in there until I tell them "okay". At first I had to tell them to "wait" and slam the crate door in their faces a few times, and work up to them waiting for a few seconds with me right there before even attempting to go out of sight.

I can't remember - do you have her wait with her food bowl on the floor before being released to eat? If not, do that too. Pick up the bowl each time she breaks the sit and wait for her to sit again. As soon as you can put down the bowl without her breaking, release her immediately. Work up to being able to walk away from the bowl with her still in a sit, and wait for eye contact before releasing her to eat, don't let her stare at the bowl.

Do it with toys too, sit and eye contact "makes" you play with her.
 

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I was going to post about this too...it's the one habit we have not been able to break Regen of. She jumps to greet my husband and I, and we have tried ignoring her completely when we get home for 10 minutes (which means she will follow us trying to jump or jumping and just falling off), and though she now usually only jumps 1-2xs and then will go lie down or sit (we ignore her until she does this), it is a really irritating behavior ESPECIALLY because she also hates getting her nails trimmed and so often her nails are sharp!
She jumps up when we're training and she can't figure out what to do, or if she's overstimulated.

She DID mouth if we tried to grab her paws, and like you, this was a habit we were also trying to break.

She never gets reinforced for jumping- by attention (other than walking away), eye contact, access to anything...but she still does it when we come home. It's been a couple of months. She sits to go through doors, eat, get out of her crate, get a treat, get her collar on, get into the car, etc...but jumps to greet still.

I hesitate to knee her in the ribcage because she was physically abused before we got her and we have tried to only use positive methods with her.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Truly, the most irritating thing about Ziva is her intelligence.:D

IF - & only IF - we have food treats, she'll comply 99% of the time. (And she looks so gorgeous doing so...) She is great with her "wait" coming out of the crate & equally so while I put her bowl down.

I am going to start on all your suggestions tonight. I can't thank you enough for helping. We spent way too much $$ on worthless / abusive Board-and-Trainers & we not only have the same problems, but these new ones (like jumping, mouthing, peeing in the house).

Our biggest asset is that we love her to death. And her IQ. We wanted this big girl, altho we didn't she'd keep growing. it's up to us to make it work.

Becky
 

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Truly, the most irritating thing about Ziva is her intelligence.:D
:rofl: I know, it's a blessing and a curse, isn't it?

The fact that she "gets it" with her food and the crate is great - you've already got a foundation of her understanding that her behavior can make good things happen. You just have to use your imagination to figure out how to exploit that in other areas. And if it takes a lot of treats for awhile - do that. Worry about phasing them out later. When I get a brand new puppy I wear my treat bag around the house from the time I get home from work until bedtime. Ziva is older, but she's relatively new to you, so treat her like a puppy and start with the basics. Reward what you like, make what you don't like not work anymore to get what she wants. The more motivated she is to get something, in this case going through a door, the faster she'll learn how to make it happen.

I think the next step for me would be to take the things she's learned (impulse control in the crate and at mealtimes) and turn that into default behavior. Stop asking for it and start just expecting it. With my dogs I don't need to tell them sit or down before I put the bowl on the floor, I don't need to tell them "watch" (although when my hubby feeds them he insists on doing so, even though I've told him several times they'll do it without being told to :rolleyes:) I just stand there and wait for it. Same thing at doorways, my dogs now know that if I walk up to a door with them and just stand there, they need to sit. I don't tell them "wait" at the crate, they know that just because the door is open it doesn't mean they get to come out, they have to wait until I say they can. It's house rules, and expected. The stronger your default behaviors the better.

Jumping on people is tough, I've struggled with this with Halo. With other people, no problem. She's on leash, so I can control it. But when I come home from work she's so excited that she charges the door and there's a head poking through before I can get it open enough to try and walk through. With her and Keefer both, walking in and immediately turning around and ignoring them until they calmed down did not work. I swear I tried that for MONTHS with Keef, and he just jumped on my back instead of my front, lol!

Some things that have worked: First, work on a "back" command, where you get her to back up when you walk towards her. Start in a hallway if you need to, and just a step or two at first, mark and reward, working up to longer distances. For one thing it's a good way to establish that you're the leader by making them yield space to you, so I routinely walk into my dogs to back them up. Practice in every area of the house and outdoors.

Second, have a mat or some clear boundary that you'd like her go retreat to when you or others come into the house. Working on my own with this the easiest way to get them to back up far enough to at least get inside was to carry treats in my car. I'd bring a handful with me when I got to the door, and as soon as I opened it I said "back" and tossed them over the dogs' heads. Whoever moved away from the door faster got the bulk of treats, and it gave me enough time to get inside and close the door without being mauled by happy exuberant dogs. From there I could walk into them and get them to sit and reward with another treat before releasing. If they were shoving their way into the crack of the door so I couldn't even get an arm in to toss the treats, I'd close the door again. Open the door, dog heads in the way, close the door, over and over until they figured out that I wasn't coming in unless they backed off a bit. You can also practice this by coming in the door and leaving again and repeating the exercise. Mine were noticeably less excited the second time I came home in an evening and then the third time. Do it 3 or 4 times in a row every day.

My husband has finally started working on this with me, and that's made it a lot easier than doing it by myself. I'd made a lot of progress, but what really helped was to have him with the dogs on leash inside, so he could prevent them from rushing the door. If your husband can be inside rewarding her for maintaining a down stay and keeping her in place with the leash, that would be perfect. Trade off and do it with him coming home and you inside with the leash and treats.
 

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How are things going with Ziva?
 

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I read this somewhere...havn't tried myself though: Have her on the leash and step on the leash preventing the jumping. We have tried the "only when you sit" trick...and it takes practice and patience! When I come home, my girls know they will only get attention if we go into he family room and sit. The leash trick might help!
 

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Discussion Starter #17
I certainly appreciate all the help you guys have offered! People say Irish Setters are crazy dogs, but it sure was easier training them - from pups - than this big girl! I'll start using the leash more in the house. But then, she also jumps like crazy as soon as the leash goes on in the morning. And I HAVE done that move where my foot is on her leash a couple of feet from the floor. She's just stubborn, for then she starts flopping all over the place like a beached whale. She just has had no manners-training & she's hard to control because of her size - she's gained almost 15 lbs in the few months we've had her.

Last night, she did her Jumping Jee-Ho-Sa-Fat thing again & this time - fwop - there went the sliding screen door. (Well, the frame's still there, but the screen material blows in the breeze...:eek:)
 

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OK, Ziva is seriously gonna drive me to drink...

Last night, we were out back with her. She saw 1 of our cats thru the slider door & started jumping up & down at the door. I understand the "excitement", but she refused to listen to ANYthing we said. I grabbed her leash & looped it around her neck (didn't take the time to find the loop on her collar), pulled her away from door while telling her "leave it" & "sit". Did absolutely nothing at all. I wound up placing my own butt in a chair, then making her lie down & held my foot on the leash so she couldn't get up. All verbal commands were ignored. Even at that, she flopped back & forth a couple of times in an attempt to get up. She FINALLY calmed down about 10 minutes later. A short while later, she was fine - kept going over to the door & looking, but had stopped the crazy jumping. But the screen door? Dead. Bent & shredded.

This morning, the MINUTE I came at her with the leash, the jumping started all over again. Almost the same as last night, where I had to sit & hold her leash with my foot so she would STOP!

I have to wear a temporary ostomy appliance for a cancer I beat last year. While jumping, she snapped that thing off. Good thing it was empty. I'm trying everything you all have suggested, but this is out of control. Is there a quicker way to do this? Or should I just have a shot of JD? And quit bugging you guys? :eek::rolleyes:
 

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With my dogs, I use a stern, "Get Off", and scowl, while trying to avoid the paws. That's enough for them to get the message for that occassion. Of course, I have to repeat this every day until the puppy gets the complete message. Basically, you are starting from puppy level, also.

You need to make sure everybody is on board. Just one reward (petting and/or smiling) for jumping up and you are back to square one.
 
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