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Our 20 mo. old girl is on a Kibble diet, with her frequent treats of chicken foot and a sardine. I’ve read some posts here where people are feeding as much as 6 cups per day. We are currently using Taste of the Wild (venison) with the recommended ammount of 3-3.75 cups per day for 60-80 lb dog. Even at this, she is not too thin at all. Do various brands of kibble vary that much in terms of ammount?
 

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Sometimes it also depends on how lean you want your dog to be at 22 months old I was still feeding my GSD 3 cups a day. She was a healthy weight and not bulky.
 

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Yes, they do vary that much.

I aim for foods that can meet my dogs nutritional needs in 3 cups. My boys are smaller in size, but volume wise, I like the 3 cup ration.
 

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Yes, even within the same line, kibble can be different sizes and densities. I was feeding up to 6 cups a day as a puppy, now he gets 4. My other dog switch from Fromm to Hills ID until I can figure out which food to switch her to, and the amount went up 50% in volume. Her weight stayed the same.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Yeah, I found the Kcal info.

Taste of the Wild gets pretty high marks on Dog Food Advisor. If other brands have a much larger recommended ammount, could be more fillers? Our girl is 80 lbs., thinking more quantity might be more satisfying.....I know it is for me! LOL
 

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Kibbles do vary, but so does your dog's caloric requirements when they're growing or very active. I have used several different brands, and usually start with the amount listed on the bag and then adjust based on the dog's appearance. When my dog was growing fast, between 6 and 9 months, she was eating 6 or even 7 cups of kibble and still had bones showing! Now that she's fully grown she's back to 3.5 cups.
 

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Kcals per cup can vary widely between foods. Some are as little as 300 kcals, possibly even less. The lower the caloric density, the lower the quality of the food, generally - less nutrition, and more fillers. The most inexpensive, lowest quality foods are least likely to even provide that information on their websites or on the bag. I'm using a food that has 490 kcals per cup, so I need quite a bit less volume to provide the same level of nutrition as a lower quality food with fewer kcals per cup.
 
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