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touchpad???

You mean perch work? It teaches rear end awareness which is pretty important.
 

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touchpad???

You mean perch work? It teaches rear end awareness which is pretty important.


I guess you do perch work on a touch pad lol. And okay. That’s something I was wondering. I’ll give it a shot. Any tips?


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Necessary, no. Helpful, can be. Fun, yes. Unfortunately is means that the dog is circling around his front feet, when in reality the handler is usually the center of the circle.
 

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I guess you do perch work on a touch pad lol. And okay. That’s something I was wondering. I’ll give it a shot. Any tips?


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Amanda's video is quite helpful

https://vimeo.com/88610515

Get a bowl from Tractor supply that will support the weight of the dog. You might need to have two bowls doubled.

Dogs don't know they can move their butts independently. Typically you'll want to swing the dog in the direction of the heel position but make sure to go both ways. It's important because you have to finish your dog after recalls and retrieves to bring them back to basic position. You are pointed on each finish. That dog needs to know where to put his butt and move his body.

Click as soon as he moves his feet so he connects that. Once he starts to get it, ask for more movement before clicking.
 

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The first thing I would decide and work on is whether you want an AKC static heel or a static service heel and begin to work on that with food. I prefer a service finish, which requires more hind end awareness.
 

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As someone is not a huge fan of the modern constant dead locked eyeball stare style heel while walking 50 paces and making turns (frequent eye contact and handler attentiveness I can dig, but not eyeballs glued to me right off a cliff. I'd rather see a dog glancing frequently at his handler but also paying attention to his surroundings. But that is just me and my stubbornness about Situational Awareness) but does it because I want to play too, I can tell you with 100 % certainty using a bowl with one dog and not with another has made a noticeable difference lol. The one I didn't use any of that stuff with has zero rear end awareness with, is big, and teaching him rear end awareness once he was big and habits were set in was very difficult. Even know that he knows what I mean, it looks forced. Because it is.

The 2nd dog, I started him on a bowl, then stopped. So he is just a little better than the big one. But I do see a difference for sure. Had I stuck with it he would be much better right now. Looks like I am going down the same path though. So yeah..I recommend using the bowl and sticking with it lol.
 

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As someone is not a huge fan of the modern constant dead locked eyeball stare style heel while walking 50 paces and making turns (frequent eye contact and handler attentiveness I can dig, but not eyeballs glued to me right off a cliff. I'd rather see a dog glancing frequently at his handler but also paying attention to his surroundings. But that is just me and my stubbornness about Situational Awareness) but does it because I want to play too, I can tell you with 100 % certainty using a bowl with one dog and not with another has made a noticeable difference lol. The one I didn't use any of that stuff with has zero rear end awareness with, is big, and teaching him rear end awareness once he was big and habits were set in was very difficult. Even know that he knows what I mean, it looks forced. Because it is.



The 2nd dog, I started him on a bowl, then stopped. So he is just a little better than the big one. But I do see a difference for sure. Had I stuck with it he would be much better right now. Looks like I am going down the same path though. So yeah..I recommend using the bowl and sticking with it lol.


I also tend not to be a huge fan of the focus in the heel. It’s not practical. Looks nice in competition though. I wish it wasn’t required. I don’t think it will be in American schutzhund....I’ll have to check it out. I kinda feel my dog is supposed to be aware of the surroundings


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Well, let me expand on that a little. I was a little too hasty and broad brushed in expressing my opinion. School bus was coming lol I absolutely see the value in bonding enough and earning enough trust that your dog WOULD blindly put his whole self into your hands. And having a dog that would do that for you through a wall of fire is also invaluable. I'd like to see it implemented more sporadically rather than a constant neck crane. Like, through distractions. I think it is a great exercise to demonstrate when a decoy is present, or through a group. I guess what I mean is I would like to see it turn on and off, not be constant.
 

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Well, let me expand on that a little. I was a little too hasty and broad brushed in expressing my opinion. School bus was coming lol I absolutely see the value in bonding enough and earning enough trust that your dog WOULD blindly put his whole self into your hands. And having a dog that would do that for you through a wall of fire is also invaluable. I'd like to see it implemented more sporadically rather than a constant neck crane. Like, through distractions. I think it is a great exercise to demonstrate when a decoy is present, or through a group. I guess what I mean is I would like to see it turn on and off, not be constant.


Idk. I’m going probably teach it to my dog regardless. But I feel it’s not practical. I feel my dog can listen to me without looking at me. I’d could be the only one that prefers it. Idk.


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And FYI - the cofounder of American Schutzhund is Deb Zappia. Deb Zappia is the one that taught me perch work and rear end awareness. I'm willing to be that precision in obedience will be pointed.
 

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And FYI - the cofounder of American Schutzhund is Deb Zappia. Deb Zappia is the one that taught me perch work and rear end awareness. I'm willing to be that precision in obedience will be pointed.


Yes, I’m aware. And oh that’s cool! Iron is in my dogs pedigree. And I I read in the rule book that “Any style of heeling is acceptable”. So I’m not sure. I guess that’s vague. Either way, As I said I’m going to start working on it. Was able to get the 2 front paws on the bowl yesterday...but that’s it. Nothing as far as turning. She wasn’t having it. I guess I should
Just continue to try to lure? Thanks for all the knowledge Jax. I do appreciate the responses.


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"Attention heeling can allow you to move from one position through distractions of citizens yelling and creating disturbances. Attention heeling can also allow you to keep your dog calm and be able to deploy him for a track without becoming agitated by these distractions and interrupting his ability to concentrate on a track, for example. Each tool takes time to develop, but what you have in the end are more options for successful deployments."
from an article by Jerry Bradshaw and Sean Siggins
So there is a tactical advantage to attention/focused heeling. I think many people don't train for it because it is very difficult, has to be done correctly, and takes a lot of time and repetition. You also have to have a dog with sufficient drive or you are spitting in the wind. That doesn't mean extreme prey drive, but rather sufficient.
 

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In summary the perch is fun! No reason not to do it. Evertime I have reached out with an American Schutzhund question they have been friendly, eager to help, and chat about their new endeavor. I have hats and Tshirts already lol
 

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In summary the perch is fun! No reason not to do it. Evertime I have reached out with an American Schutzhund question they have been friendly, eager to help, and chat about their new endeavor. I have hats and Tshirts already lol


Yes, yes. We digress. I will be doing the perch work.


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What does your trainer have to say about the perchwork? They didn't show you this months ago when your dog was a puppy?
 

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No, it doesn't need to be done. There are other ways to teach rear end awareness. It does have its purpose, though, and is an easy way for most people to do this.

A dog watching you in heeling shows the bond and relationship with the handler. It can also be created through artificial means. I don't care for the head up the arm pit look that is too often created in training and not developed through training and relationship. It is NOT needed for high points, but the dog giving your focus is. In dogs with high pack drive this is very easy to get. Dogs with less pack drive it can be more difficult, but still possible.

This is competition and obedience. It has nothing to do with the dog being unaware of its surroundings or wanting the dog to look around. You are either willing to put the time in to develop that relationship with your dog or you are not.


These dogs were trained with food, toy and a little pinch to keep the forward momentum controlled. No force to make them look at me. No sticks to get the heads up. NO ball or toy under the arm (bites there hurt!). Deja was a bit flashier than Vala due to her structure.
 

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Yes, yes. We digress. I will be doing the perch work.


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My dogs are very enthusiastic about learning touch pads. We do it for the fun of it. I have found that once they get it, they will independently use any hard round item such as a frisbee or a plastic, dollar store oil pan to scooter all over the place whether it is on the tile porch, grass, or even cement in the basement. It has become a great source of pleasure and exercise for them.
 

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This is competition and obedience. It has nothing to do with the dog being unaware of its surroundings or wanting the dog to look around. You are either willing to put the time in to develop that relationship with your dog or you are not.
I was referring to how an attentive heel has tactical advantages in police dogs and it is not just a sport thing.
 
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