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I'm noticing, that some people are training GSD by using commands in german language, although they don't speak it at all.

Does it have any purpose? (eg. schutzhund)? Or it's just that they're trying to look cool or something?
 

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No, we aren't just trying to look cool ;) In fact, since we don't pronounce the words correctly, we would fail miserably in that aspect.

I use a mix of English and German in IPO. Never really thought about why. Probably because my trainer uses them. I do think the German words are sharper. Revier to Search. Fuss to Heel. Platz to down. The words seem to flow better and are sharper, cleaner, commands. I use Out and Go and Sit. Out and Sit are very close to German (Ous / Sitz) And I just hate the sound of Voraus instead of Go.
 

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I personally considered teaching my pup's commands in German so that others could not tell him what to do. I had an issue previously with my golden retriever and people giving her commands while I was trying to get her to do things. Because she loves everyone and is very obedient to follow all commands, she would do whatever they said. That's a good way to get her stolen!
 

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I actually speak German pretty well from taking 5+ years of it in school but still I do NOT use German commands...While the words are fun to say with angry tone around friends etc....I will still always be way to embarassed to yell "Haltestelle" in front of strangers in public lol
 

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It can help to have commands that you and nobody else around you uses in everyday language. Absolutely no mixed signals for the dog.

You can also use two sets of commands German and English to create a more formal and informal command set. So like go lay down in your spot versus lay down and stay there until I release you to get up type thing. My dog Codi has or was getting a mix and match of other languages for me to use because my family is inconsistent with training and won't enforce commands. Unfortunately once they realized that she listened to the other language commands they started using those as well and ruined them. I'll have to be more training but won't work until I move out unfortunately. But there's my reasoning for it.

I also like others liked the idea of my dogs not listening to strangers who could maybe take her. But realized if something happened to me or if I was gone they wouldn't know her commands. Part of the reason I used English as well. Well and hand signals.
 

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My family is from Nuremberg so naturally when we moved to America and decided to get our first dog my parents wanted a German shepherd! Growing up we always taught our dogs both the German and English commands... it always cracks me up going to IPO events and hearing people mispronounce words. I especially love the people with pitbulls and non German breeds that mispronounce and train their dogs with German commands. I chose not to teach my current dog the German commands, I just prefer the English. My dad forgets sometimes when he comes over and will yell at my dog PLATZ!!! Why is he so poorly trained? Why doesn't he even know platz by now!!! You need to train your dog!! Always have to remind him my dog only knows DOWN dad... i see the need to train German commands in police work as you may not want a criminal knowing how to command your dog. However when everyday people use the commands I find it annoying because I expect them to be fluent and will try to strike a conversation with them only to get a blank look.
 

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I have always trained my trained my sport dogs and work dogs in German. My dogs have two sets of commands one in English and one set in German, in addition to hand signals. My wife will give commands in English, but will not reinforce them. "Down" in English means "down" but not stay. She can tell my dogs to down, and it is a loose command. I use "platz" and that means down and stay, there is no breaking or movement allowed. My dogs have between 1 1/2 - 2 seconds to perform a command that I give them. Platz means hit the deck and stay there, even when running 30 mph chasing a ball, squirrel or person. My dogs simply will not respond to my wife in the same way. "Here" or Hier is reserved for outside and means come to me at full speed. A dog can not run full speed in the house, so "come" is used inside. "Here" means recall at full speed. I am the only one that uses that command.

My current dog came from Holland and is trained in Dutch, I changed a couple of his commands and his name when I got him. No one deals with him but me, so others giving him commands is not an issue.

German is a good language to use for commands, the words are sharp and to the point. Dutch is similar. We also use a different language when training to avoid other people from trying to give our dogs commands. At work there are certain things that you simply can not say because of our politically correct society. "Get em" or "get him, son" doesn't sound good when the general public hears it. So, we use the German "Get him" command of "packen" or the dutch command of "Stellen!" We achieve the same result with out all the unnecessary aggravation. It also separates what we tell suspects from what we tell the dog. If I want a suspect to remain standing because there is a gun at his feet, but I want my dog to down and stay, I say "af" to the dog. If I told my dog "down" it may confuse the suspect causing him to go to the ground, for example.

For my sport dog, English commands are a little looser, German commands are stricter, higher energy and more precise. The dog knows the difference.
 

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I used to use verschlingen! (engulf and devour), now I just say Eat! Eat! She shows instant obedience.
 

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I personally considered teaching my pup's commands in German so that others could not tell him what to do. I had an issue previously with my golden retriever and people giving her commands while I was trying to get her to do things. Because she loves everyone and is very obedient to follow all commands, she would do whatever they said. That's a good way to get her stolen!
Boy have I had a lot of trouble with strangers trying to train my dogs. I use a different language now to avoid any confusion with my dogs and it has worked out tremendously well.
 

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I personally considered teaching my pup's commands in German so that others could not tell him what to do. I had an issue previously with my golden retriever and people giving her commands while I was trying to get her to do things. Because she loves everyone and is very obedient to follow all commands, she would do whatever they said. That's a good way to get her stolen!
Personally, I think if your dog is friendly enough to get stolen, the thief doesn't need to use any commands. I don't care if my dog follows your commands at all because he knows them. You won't be able to get him out of my car though, just because you're saying here, foos. Once I tell my dog to do something, he has to do it even if a stranger with a handful of hot dogs is giving him every command he knows. But once I let him interact with someone, I don't care if they have him sit, or heel, or call him to them. Whatever.
 

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Personally, I think if your dog is friendly enough to get stolen, the thief doesn't need to use any commands. I don't care if my dog follows your commands at all because he knows them. You won't be able to get him out of my car though, just because you're saying here, foos. Once I tell my dog to do something, he has to do it even if a stranger with a handful of hot dogs is giving him every command he knows. But once I let him interact with someone, I don't care if they have him sit, or heel, or call him to them. Whatever.
Yes, she is too friendly. Commands would help, but they wouldn't be required. That is why she is only out of my sight when she is confined in the house, behind a locked door. She does not get to be out in the backyard by herself at all, and if others are around, she is at my side at all times. Normally though, she won't go more than 5 feet away from me by her own choice. She would not leave the backyard without me, which I like. She may, however, be convinced to leave the backyard if someone were calling her.

In this instance, I was living with a family that had 7(!) kids, and while I was trying to get her to go outside to go to the bathroom so we could get into the car, they kept calling her to them and grabbing onto her collar so she couldn't come back to me. These types of things happened all the time. I do realize that this was partially a training issue and that she should have just ignored them, but they were making it SO difficult for everyone. They would encourage her to jump up on them, beg, bark, etc. They even had the audacity to go around telling people that she was their dog, and for whatever reason, that really pissed me off. Maybe I'm a little territorial myself. ;)
 

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Yes, she is too friendly. Commands would help, but they wouldn't be required. That is why she is only out of my sight when she is confined in the house, behind a locked door. She does not get to be out in the backyard by herself at all, and if others are around, she is at my side at all times. Normally though, she won't go more than 5 feet away from me by her own choice. She would not leave the backyard without me, which I like. She may, however, be convinced to leave the backyard if someone were calling her.

In this instance, I was living with a family that had 7(!) kids, and while I was trying to get her to go outside to go to the bathroom so we could get into the car, they kept calling her to them and grabbing onto her collar so she couldn't come back to me. These types of things happened all the time. I do realize that this was partially a training issue and that she should have just ignored them, but they were making it SO difficult for everyone. They would encourage her to jump up on them, beg, bark, etc. They even had the audacity to go around telling people that she was their dog, and for whatever reason, that really pissed me off. Maybe I'm a little territorial myself. ;)
I actually had neighbors similar to what you describe. What a nightmare! It really messes with any training done. I had to start confining my dogs in the house all the time too unless I had time to be out with them. They were young dogs, I got them as puppies and did not think it would be much of an issue if they liked the neighbors. Ultimately they had extreme bonding issues, did not seem to be able to form one. Not sure if it was the neighbors, genetics or a combination of both.
 

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Besides training Pytheis, you're going to see some distinct differences in the breeds and how a lot of the terms describing temperament are going to be so situational with a Shepherd vs a Golden. A goofy Golden tends to be goofy all the time. With my Shepherds, they can be a goof here, and then real serious there.
 

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There is a reason I am much more active on this GSD forum than over on the golden retriever forum, even though I have a golden and do not have a shepherd at the moment. I much prefer the aloof nature and family-only oriented temperaments of GSDs. After my golden passes, I will likely not get another one. I dislike the "loves everyone" attitudes in goldens. I still love her to death, but German shepherds are definitely my breed.
 

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I'm noticing, that some people are training GSD by using commands in german language, although they don't speak it at all.

Does it have any purpose? (eg. schutzhund)? Or it's just that they're trying to look cool or something?
I have had dogs who were trained in German, Dutch, Turkish and French as well as whistles, signs, and English.
Some of it had a practical purpose and some was just for fun, to see how much the dogs could learn.
Our patrol dogs were trained in German largely to prevent the possibility of outside interference. When it became more popular, I switched to Turkish with mine.
 

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My SIL is living with my partner and I at the moment, so I don't want my training undone by someone else. Similar to what Slamdunc mentioned. If someone tells my dog to "down", chances are they mean get off me, get off the counter, couch, etc. They don't mean drop into a sphinx position and stay there until I say otherwise. That's what Platz is for. I get a lot of questions about why I use German commands when I'm out in public, and often the question is, "Is it because she's a German Shepherd?" I always laugh. It's really just for clarity sake for her. I don't want her getting confused on when a command is flexible and when it's absolute.

For example, when she's in the yard I might yell, "Ryka, come here!" and to be honest, I don't really expect her to come immediately. I expect her to mosey on over at some point. However, if I yell, "Ryka, HIER!", you can bet your bottom she better drop what she's doing and come as fast as she can and sit in a front. That being said, I never use an "absolute" command unless I can reinforce it. Otherwise I'm just setting us both up for failure.

As for other people giving commands... I always laugh when they say it absolutely wrong. I'm not perfect in my pronunciation, but I did have a German club member teach me how to say the words. My FIL always tries to tell Ryka to "plot" when he sees her, lol!
 

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My dogs aren't involved in sports or other activities that language matters. I use a lot of hand signals. Spoken commands are only in English. My shepherd is a slow kid. She could never be bilingual. lol! We have some command adaptations. When my shepherd goes into her den - behind the bush, under the deck, I yell, "OUT!" She comes every time and that is her word. For the hound dog, 'Come' has been modified to 'EAT!' Hound dog - needs no explanation. HA!
 

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I taught my last dog to ignore commands given by anyone but me...so the language used didn't matter. When ever anyone else gave her a command she would look at me, if given a release she would follow the command, if not she'd go back to sleep or whatever else she was doing. Within the confines of the house or other enclosed space a stranger attempting to give her a command usually caused her to object with a growl, if the persisted she'd escalate that to a bark. I never had anyone press her beyond that...
 

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There is a reason I am much more active on this GSD forum than over on the golden retriever forum, even though I have a golden and do not have a shepherd at the moment. I much prefer the aloof nature and family-only oriented temperaments of GSDs. After my golden passes, I will likely not get another one. I dislike the "loves everyone" attitudes in goldens. I still love her to death, but German shepherds are definitely my breed.
Off topic, but exactly!

When I was starting this thread, my first alternative thought (except some regulations in Schuz., IPO) was, that it's done to eliminate control of your dog from strangers. But I disregarded that thought immediately. They aren't golden retrievers, they are aloof, owner oriented. They won't listen to strangers.

There are 4 people in our house. My GSD listens to me. Also listens to my wife, if she has food. And that's it! Even other 2 people living with GSD are ignored, how could a stranger command a GSD? I have problem believing this explanation.
 
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