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From another post on the forum, I started perusing this site called Skeptvet. Interesting reading. This posting mentioned one small study (which I know means almost nothing) that use of coconut oil decreased scent discrimination for dogs.

Coconut Oil for Pets? | The SkeptVet

Just interesting to keep in mind for our SAR dogs.
 

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I don't know, I feed coconut oil and my male does competitive scent detection and has an awesome sniffer. On Monday we did a demo for a veterinary assistant class at the local college and he was 100% in his finds. And my young bitch just started tracking and picked it up like no dog I've ever seen.
If it affects their scenting ability, it can't affect it very much.
 

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Dog eating coconut oil or was coconut oil being used to hide a scent? I would put coconut oil on max's nose when its dry. He hates the smell of it. Had to stop using it.
 

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The article was for dietary supplementation it was very interesting. Actually I have not been giving coconut oil but giving foods with high animal oil content
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Hi Nancy. What is your thought there... about the high animal oil content?
 

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Fat burns cooler....i am talking 30..20 time tested for SportDog mixes
 

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http://www.news.cornell.edu/stories/2013/03/more-fat-less-protein-improves-detection-dogs-sniffers

There is a lot we don't know now in this study this was detection dogs protection dogs tend to work in bursts and rest in between sessions. Working search dogs tend to work steadily for long periods of time. but obviously both have to use their nose. Now I would not be too excited about giving a dog lots of corn oil but it does raise interesting questions on dietary components and performance
 

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Thanks for that article! Very interesting. Nancy, what do you feed Beau? I'm mixing two foods right now one at 28% protein and 13% crude fat and one that is 19% protein and 17% crude fat. Long story why... What have you tended to? Do you add polyunsaturated fats at all?
 

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No polyunsaturated fats added. I am feeding Farmina Ancient Grains right now which is basically 30/18. Right now it is cod because fish is a "cooling" food

Single Animal Protein Wild Cod & Ancestral Grain Recipe | Farmina Pet Foods - Happy pet. Happy You.

Herbsmith Food Energetics Charts

I have not added any other fats -- I may look at it when we go to lamb and chicken in the winter though I may look around. I like that the food, made in Italy, is GMO free which we can't say for American Chicken unless it is organic.

That is one study and I think police detection dogs work in such spurts. At training the other day Beau did just fine locating a few ounces of tissue buried about 18 inches deep at the top of a hill. I am not seeing problems with detection limits but if we were doing blood spatter forensics detail kind of work maybe I would look more.
 

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I am sceptical of skeptvet .

I went to several of the links provided on this site and then took the time to read their response to reader`s questions and comments.

Does this person ever identify themself.

They go on to criticize Dogs Naturally magazine, Dr Karen Becker and even Dr Jean Dodds are all on quack watch.

read ``
As far as Dr. Dodds is concerned, she has certainly made many significant and valuable contributions to veterinary medicine. She is also dedicated to a number of ideas that are absolutely pseudoscientific. She was awarded the honor of Holistic Veterinarian of the Year in 1994, she promotes an unvalidated salivary test for food allergies, and she has been quoted as saying such things as (http://www.itsfortheanimals.com/DODDS-NUTRITION-THYROID.HTM):
“Holistic alternatives and homeopathic remedies can be used in place of standard allopathic treatments for immunologic disorders”
“Bolstering detoxification pathways mediated through the cytochrome P450 system and via conjugation with protective amino acids (glutathiones, cysteine, taurine) is important. Antioxidants including vitamins A, C, D and E, selenium, bioflavonoids and homeopathics are used as biosupport to strengthen the patient’s metabolism and immune system before implementing harsh detoxification regimens (once offending toxicants have been identified by such methods as applied kinesiology, intero- and electrodiagnostics). This author supplements all patients on a weight basis with extra vitamin E (100-400 IU/day), vitamin C in the ester C form (500-1500mg/day), Echinacea with Golden Seal, and garlic, although many other herbal and supportive nutrients also can be used. Animal experiencing adverse vaccine reactions are given Thuja, Lyssin (rabies vaccine) or sulphur. Specific Bach flower remedies are also helpful.”
Dr. Dodds is a perfect example of a smart, educated, well-intentioned person who can both make important contributions to scientific medicine and be completely unscientific about alternative therapies. Her position on vaccines is extreme and in many aspects not at all evidence-based. She claims, for example, that vaccination for parvovirus is “optional” after 14 weeks, when it is well-established than maternal antibodies can interfere with vaccination and leave animals vulnerable up to 16-20 weeks, and she promotes fears about “vaccinosis” and other supposed vaccine adverse effects that wre not supported by real science. While many of her recommendations are reasonable, some are not, and she undoubtedly supports some kinds of pseudoscientific nonsense like homeopathy and Bach flower therapy, so I think that has to be considered in any evaluation of her contributions to the profession, along with the unqeustionably valuable work she has done.``

Ideally good medicine is integrative and complementary , using the best of each field`s expertise on an individual basis , acute and chronic , and proactively preventive.
This is true of human and animal care .
One can not deny the value of Traditional Chinese medicine nor Ayurvedic which have been around for over 2,000 years .

The skeptvet had a laundry list of benefits that coconut oil claims to have , which are questioned , yet Third World countries have been using the antibacterial and antidiarrheal benefits for dysentery .
Benefits are so numerous it would take an entire thread to cover them all.
Furthermore , recent (human) research is showing that coconut oil given to Alzheimer`s patients can improve the condition or at least stall the progression of this disease .

This skeptvet supports vaccination and is against raw feeding raw feeding | Search Results | The SkeptVet

part one
 

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Very interesting. Thank you for sharing, I am interested in reading y'alls thoughts, as I am not versed enough to have an opinion, lol.
 

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Carmen, I totally appreciate your input. I think for me, given my background, western scientific approaches, offer me the most consistent method for assessing the value of something, for coming to know something. Of course, it is not without its own faults and pitfalls. I think this is the root of so many of the disagreements here and elsewhere. And it really is philosophy on many levels but I think for each of us it is important to think about this consistently. What do you (not you specifically but one) think of western scientific process? What do you think of anecdotal process? What do you think of your own ability to observe objectively (which for most of us, we are not that good at)? etc. For me I rely on scientific process but am interested in other ways of knowing. In the world of dogs and many other worlds, unfortunately, the consistency of process is absent. Coconut oil is a great example... there are very few consistent controlled studies of the impact. Lots of theorizing and lots of participant observation (which is weak at best).

Anyhoo.... just some thoughts.
 

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dogs are meant to metabolize primarily protein , fat, and minimally some carbohydrates , which convert into sugars some of which are not readily absorbed in the intestines.

Concentrating on fats. Preparing for the super-search dog begins with genetics , selection of proven instinctive tracking and hunt and search skills. It continues with pre-natal (fetal) nutrition which contributes to maximizing potential by providing brain building fats and proteins .
It continues with physical conditioning . A working dog is an entire body and not just a nose. Physical condition affects performance. Knowing the dog`s emotional states allows you to prepare the working dog for it`s best performance.
Dogs that are super keen , overly excited with anticipation will need a pre-entry `blow-off` session to get their respiration settled and to work calmly and methodically.
The dog`s personal metabolic rate has to be considered.

I had experience with sled dogs which had raced professionally in major events including the Iditarod . These were vet monitored animals. Resting, pre- and post activity blood samples, rectal temperature at points throughout the extreme exercise, so temperature, heart and respiration . These dogs were being prepared for the Yukon Quest. The search dog is a canine athlete also. Not just a nose , an entire body including nasal passage , mouth to lungs , physical stamina (energy) mental state (fatigue) hydration levels , digestive competence .

The racing sled dog`s concern is for dehydration and protein catabolization , resulting in further dehydration through bloody diarrhea .

This was just a privilege to rub shoulders with some of the eager vets who specialized in working , or extreme canine sports , and those who were writing papers - the newbies with new ideas and an extra keenness.

Part of the dog`s nutrition did include a product which had 3 oils , including fish , plant (circulation - brain) and functional high level lauric acid coconut oil (glandular - brain - digestion ) . A portion . The study provided sited
quote -- or 16% fat provided by equivalent amounts of beef tallow and coconut oil -- . That is way too much .

Just a side note while I still remember this . You do NOT put coconut oil onto the nose of a scenting dog ! This will work against you. Coconut is a dry oil, it dries . The nasal cavity has to be moist and friable .

Search dogs eventually fatigue and this where coconut oil comes in handy . A little squirt of the oil will give instant energy to the muscles , bypassing digestion .

sigh , another interruption


dogs are meant to metabolize primarily protein , fat, and minimally some carbohydrates , which convert into sugars some of which are not readily absorbed in the intestines.

Concentrating on fats. Preparing for the super-search dog begins with genetics , selection of proven instinctive tracking and hunt and search skills. It continues with pre-natal (fetal) nutrition which contributes to maximizing potential by providing brain building fats and proteins .
It continues with physical conditioning . A working dog is an entire body and not just a nose. Physical condition affects performance. Knowing the dog`s emotional states allows you to prepare the working dog for it`s best performance.
Dogs that are super keen , overly excited with anticipation will need a pre-entry `blow-off` session to get their respiration settled and to work calmly and methodically.
The dog`s personal metabolic rate has to be considered.

I had experience with sled dogs which had raced professionally in major events including the Iditarod . These were vet monitored animals. Resting, pre- and post activity blood samples, rectal temperature at points throughout the extreme exercise, so temperature, heart and respiration . These dogs were being prepared for the Yukon Quest. The search dog is a canine athlete also. Not just a nose , an entire body including nasal passage , mouth to lungs , physical stamina (energy) mental state (fatigue) hydration levels , digestive competence .

The racing sled dog`s concern is for dehydration and protein catabolization , resulting in further dehydration through bloody diarrhea .

This was just a privilege to rub shoulders with some of the eager vets who specialized in working , or extreme canine sports , and those who were writing papers - the newbies with new ideas and an extra keenness.

Part of the dog`s nutrition did include a product which had 3 oils , including fish , plant (circulation - brain) and functional high level lauric acid coconut oil (glandular - brain - digestion ) . A portion . The study provided sited
quote -- or 16% fat provided by equivalent amounts of beef tallow and coconut oil -- . That is way too much .

Just a side note while I still remember this . You do NOT put coconut oil onto the nose of a scenting dog ! This will work against you. Coconut is a dry oil, it dries . The nasal cavity has to be moist and friable .

Search dogs eventually fatigue and this where coconut oil comes in handy . A little squirt of the oil will give instant energy to the muscles , bypassing digestion .

sigh , another interruption
 

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Carmspack- Hi. You said not to put coconut oil on dogs nose. Wasn't aware of that. He didn't like it. So I didn't put on it. Planning to do a nose works class. Know he is going to love it. Do not want to mess up his scenting ability. What do you suggest I put on his nose sometimes gets very dry.
 

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Keeping the DOG hydrated is most important! Sometimes they are too excited to drink. I keep some kibble to throw in his water so he will drink down to get it. He has to keep his nose wet with his tongue. And, yes, coconut oil is a good "energy treat". I usually force breaks on my dog every 20-30 minutes. Detection work is hard as they are not cooling themselves as efficiently while they are breathing in a manner to hunt for and follow odor.


https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Philtrum
 

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Jocoyn is right . Hydration , not schmearing something on the nose .
You can juice some watermelon with the white and some rind which is rich in citrulline .

Dogs love it.

This mix provides potassium and electrolytes , a bit of sugar for energy , lycopene as an anti inflammatory and the citrulline for recovery.
You can use clean water or coconut water for more electrolytes.
 

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He does drink an awfully lot maybe its not enough. Cant wait to try this I am sure he is going to love it. Thank you:)
 
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