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My neighbor had an "oops" litter. The parents are brother and sister. What are the chances the puppies will live a healthy life? They all look healthy and are growing properly.*** IMPORTANT: please don't discuss the ignorance of the owner and stupidity of the mistake. We ALL know it was wrong. I am NOT trying to spark a fight, I want thoughtful information. Thanks.
 

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I'm not sure how anyone can answer this question with inbred puppies whose parents may or may not even have OFA's done. You could have genetic diseases pop up as they age. Genetic temperament issues could develop. Or they could live to be 15 and be the best dogs ever.
 

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The usual thing with an 'oops' litter is for the owner to sell the pups on a spay/neuter contract so that there will be no concerns about a too-closely bred dog reproducing. As for if they will have genetic problems, well, it's a crapshoot. It's impossible to say what the odds are. Of course, it would help to see the pedigrees of the parents, and know if there was already a lot of linebreeding or inbreeding in their pedigrees, and if the owner ever had them tested (hips, elbows, DM).

But like I said, there's no way of being sure. I have a female that's a total outcross - no common ancestors in her pedigree at all. Both parents are extremely well-bred, and there are 5 generations of good hips behind them. Guess what? She failed OFA at age 2. One hip was mildly dysplastic.
 

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Total crapshoot. If your neighbor doesn't know anything about the genetics of the dogs and hasn't done any health testing (such as OFA on hips and elbows, maybe an Embark profile), then there is simply no way to know what issues may have been passed on to the pups, and probably amplified since they carry the same genes.
 

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WORSE than a crapshoot. Let's see if I can put this into words here? Broadly, generally, figuratively speaking, brother x sister share identical pedigrees, and 2 dogs = 4 grandparents. If brother and sister are purebred, you're odds of serious issues increase dramatically. If brother and sister are mixedbreed, odds of issues may decrease dramatically.
When it comes to dirty work, it's best to get it over with as soon as possible. The longer you wait, the harder it is. That said I'll assume the very notion, there, is entirely unfathomable :) If so, I suggest somebody brush up their on puppy temperament evaluation skills, regardless of breed/s involved. Might be some real good temp in there? Might not? Be prepared for BOTH.

edit: I was in a bit of a hurry earlier, so let's see if I can elaborate a little further now. Brother x sister is THE BIG no no. You really have to write some peds in order to see what I mean, but sire x daughter and son x dam are only half as inbred as brother x sister.

I've seen plenty of sire x daughter and son x dam waaay back in the gsd pedigree database, but I've never found a brother x sister. Common sense suggests they surely tried, but it never made the grade.
 

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Neither gsd nor purebred, but I just found a brother x sister in the pedigree database. Where 2 or better yet three breeds are involved, risks associated with inbreeding MAY be somewhat diminished.


dog seems to like the game? stubby little tail wagging away

rbt peds are an interesting study

before WWII stalin dispatched state kynologists to ghent (et al) in order to procure the best stock they could find. After the war I assume they just "commandeered" (ie; took) whatever they wanted throughout the eastern bloc. Getting a little OT again... as usual... sorry :)
 

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Don't kid yourself. Purebreeding = inbreeding, especially in the case of gsd. Those old rbt peds I posted above are FAR LESS inbred than even the most assortatively mated modern gsd. Other breed conformation enthusiasts have been doing multi sire AI "composite" litters for a time now, and it hasn't helped a bit. When the practice catches on with gsd breeders, things will go down hill at warp speed.

in it's purest form "improved breeding" is only an attempt to manage inbreeding depression
 
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